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Old June 12th 10, 09:16 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are other goodmoves

r2r2k1/pbqn1p1p/1p1bp1p1/8/3P3R/3BQN2/PP1B1PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 1

In the above position, white to move, from Plaskett's book p. 19,
Hansen - Vescovi, Copenhagen 1995, I chose Ng5, which gives white a
0.85 advantage, the book suggests even better Hansen's move Bxg6!,
which gives a two pawn advantage, but Fritz suggests a move that is
thematically related to these two moves but that you'll never guess
(and neither did Plaskett suggest it), which gives an incredible +4
centipawn advantage! Part of the reason this move is hard to find is
that there are the other two moves that camouflage it.

What is that move? Hint: think like a chessplayer...several moves
ahead.

RL
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Old June 12th 10, 09:31 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

On 12 June, 09:16, raylopez99 wrote:

What is that move? *Hint: think like a chessplayer...several moves
ahead.


Your hints are USELESS!
I HEAP OPPROBRIUM ON YOU!
It was only after I STOPPED thinking like a chess player that I got
it!

Your penalty: another 6 hour ban, you teaspoon-sucking numb-chessboard
kojak lollipop!!
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Old June 12th 10, 03:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

On Jun 12, 4:16*am, raylopez99 wrote:
r2r2k1/pbqn1p1p/1p1bp1p1/8/3P3R/3BQN2/PP1B1PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 1

In the above position, white to move, from Plaskett's book p. 19,
Hansen - Vescovi, Copenhagen 1995, I chose Ng5, which gives white a
0.85 advantage, the book suggests even better Hansen's move Bxg6!,
which gives a two pawn advantage, but Fritz suggests a move that is
thematically related to these two moves but that you'll never guess
(and neither did Plaskett suggest it), which gives an incredible +4
centipawn advantage! *Part of the reason this move is hard to find is
that there are the other two moves that camouflage it.

What is that move? *Hint: think like a chessplayer...several moves
ahead.


Yes, a position where an interesting, instructive and significant
improvement was possible. Practically speaking, the text move 1.Bxg6
is strong, not to hard to find, and probably good enough to win. If
then 1...hxg6?? 2.Qh6 soon forces mate, likewise if 1...fxg6?? 2.Qxe6+
Kh8 3.Rxh7+ Kxh7 4.Ng5+ etc. However, after 1...Nf8 2.Bd3 f5, Black is
only a pawn down and still has some life in him.
What Plaskett and Hansen apparently missed was the much greater
strength of 1.Rc1!. This does much more than just gain a tempo by
attacking the Qc7. If Black moves his Q to the only safe square, b8,
he removes a defender essential to the security of h7: 1.Rc1 Qb8 2.
Bxg6! and now if 2...Nf8 3. Bxh7+!! Nxh7 4. Qh6 and Black is screwed,
blued and tattooed. 1...Bc6 is no good either: 2.Bxg6 Nf8 3.Rxc6! etc.
And the least evil, 1...Nc5 2.dxc5, is tantamount to resignation.
The players and analyst probably missed this due to the fact that in
the given position, the need for the Q to defend h7 is not obvious,
and her line to h7 is blocked by two other pieces. And with his clock
ticking, a practical GM is often content to play any move that gives
him a clear advantage, as 1.Bxg6 does, rather than spend precious time
looking for a decisive winner that may not exist.
Does Plaskett say what TL this game was played under? If it was,
say, a rapid (or faster) game, that might explain how Hansen missed
the killer. As for Plaskett, we must also keep in mind that publishing
deadlines can also cause considerable Zeitnot.
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Old June 12th 10, 03:52 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

On Jun 12, 10:16*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Jun 12, 4:16*am, raylopez99 wrote:

r2r2k1/pbqn1p1p/1p1bp1p1/8/3P3R/3BQN2/PP1B1PPP/R5K1 w - - 0 1


In the above position, white to move, from Plaskett's book p. 19,
Hansen - Vescovi, Copenhagen 1995, I chose Ng5, which gives white a
0.85 advantage, the book suggests even better Hansen's move Bxg6!,
which gives a two pawn advantage, but Fritz suggests a move that is
thematically related to these two moves but that you'll never guess
(and neither did Plaskett suggest it), which gives an incredible +4
centipawn advantage! *Part of the reason this move is hard to find is
that there are the other two moves that camouflage it.


What is that move? *Hint: think like a chessplayer...several moves
ahead.


* Yes, a position where an interesting, instructive and significant
improvement was possible. Practically speaking, the text move 1.Bxg6
is strong, not to hard to find, and probably good enough to win. If
then 1...hxg6?? 2.Qh6 soon forces mate, likewise if 1...fxg6?? 2.Qxe6+
Kh8 3.Rxh7+ Kxh7 4.Ng5+ etc. However, after 1...Nf8 2.Bd3 f5, Black is
only a pawn down and still has some life in him.
* What Plaskett and Hansen apparently missed was the much greater
strength of 1.Rc1!. This does much more than just gain a tempo by
attacking the Qc7. If Black moves his Q to the only safe square, b8,
he removes a defender essential to the security of h7: 1.Rc1 Qb8 2.
Bxg6! and now if 2...Nf8 3. Bxh7+!! Nxh7 4. Qh6 and Black is screwed,
blued and tattooed. 1...Bc6 is no good either: 2.Bxg6 Nf8 3.Rxc6! etc.
And the least evil, 1...Nc5 2.dxc5, is tantamount to resignation.
* The players and analyst probably missed this due to the fact that in
the given position, the need for the Q to defend h7 is not obvious,
and her line to h7 is blocked by two other pieces. And with his clock
ticking, a practical GM is often content to play any move that gives
him a clear advantage, as 1.Bxg6 does, rather than spend precious time
looking for a decisive winner that may not exist.
* Does Plaskett say what TL this game was played under? If it was,
say, a rapid (or faster) game, that might explain how Hansen missed
the killer. As for Plaskett, we must also keep in mind that publishing
deadlines can also cause considerable Zeitnot.


A follow-up question: Ray, are you sure you have the position
correct? Looking up this game on my database, it shows that Black's QR
was on c8, not a8. You have given a position that never occurred in
the actual game. Black had actually played 15...Ra8-c8, followed by
16.Qe2-e3 Rf8-d8, and only then did White play 17.Bxg6.
It does not make any significant difference; 17.Rc1 is still the
strongest move (about +3.55 per Rybka), with 1.Bxg6 second (+1.34).
Still, it's important to be sure one has the game score correct. Is
this Plaskett's error, or yours?

[Event "Copenhagen op 17th"]
[Site "Copenhagen"]
[Date "1995.??.??"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Hansen, Lars Bo"]
[Black "Vescovi, Giovanni P"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D05"]
[WhiteElo "2580"]
[BlackElo "2465"]
[PlyCount "37"]
[EventDate "1995.06.??"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "10"]
[EventCountry "DEN"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2004.01.01"]

1. d4 c5 2. e3 Nf6 3. Nf3 e6 4. Bd3 d5 5. O-O Nbd7 6. c3 Bd6 7. Nbd2 O-
O 8. Re1 Qc7 9. e4 cxd4 10. cxd4 dxe4 11. Nxe4 Nxe4 12. Rxe4 b6 13.
Qe2 Bb7 14. Rh4 g6 15. Bd2 Rac8 16. Qe3 Rfd8 17. Bxg6 fxg6 18. Qxe6+
Kg7 19. Rxh7+ 1-0

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Old June 12th 10, 10:51 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

On Jun 12, 5:52*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

* A follow-up question: Ray, are you sure you have the position
correct? Looking up this game on my database, it shows that Black's QR
was on c8, not a8. You have given a position that never occurred in
the actual game. Black had actually played 15...Ra8-c8, followed by
16.Qe2-e3 Rf8-d8, and only then did White play 17.Bxg6.
* It does not make any significant difference; 17.Rc1 is still the
strongest move (about +3.55 per Rybka), with 1.Bxg6 second (+1.34).
Still, it's important to be sure one has the game score correct. Is
this Plaskett's error, or yours?


Interesting. It's clearly Plaskett's (or the typesetter, the
proofreader's, or the book printer's) error, as I'm looking at the
position now, p. 19, 2002 edition, and the position is as I described
it in the OP--queen's rook on a8, not c8.

Now changing gears a bit, since I have your attention (and Offramp's
too): here is a wild "Shirov" type game I played just now...Shirov
for amateur hacks playing blitz that is...

I survived a furious series of sacrifices by black, with two mistakes
made (besides one blunder by black that lost the game): the best
move says Fritz is 14. e5!, a blocking sacrifice (! rare to see
these), and the black missed a chance to pick up a piece with
18...Bxc3!

You can stop looking after 19...Qa1+?? . You might say he misapplied
the rule "always check, it could be mate" (...yours!) a clear
blunder.

This guy likes to sacrifice, we had played another game earlier where
he resigned in this position...but you could have easily played on
(it's even):

r2k2r1/pppb1pPp/7B/5n2/2pR4/2P5/P4PPP/2K3NR w - - 0 15

Can you see why?

Actually at the time I thought resignation was sound too...until I
replayed it with Fritz.

You might say he forgot the rule: always check, it could be a mate (or
game saver!)

Kind of like those rules of practical wisdom that can go either way:
"the early bird gets the worm" (but what does the worm get for being
early? It gets eaten). Or: "Faint heart never won fair lady", but as
opposed to "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread".

RL

[Event "Rated game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Main Playing Hall"]
[Date "2010.06.13"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Ray"]
[Black "Andreas"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C45"]
[WhiteElo "1698"]
[BlackElo "1646"]
[PlyCount "83"]
[EventDate "2010.06.13"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nb3 Qf6 6. Qe2 Bb6 7.
Nc3 Nge7 8.
Be3 O-O 9. Bxb6 axb6 10. O-O-O d6 11. Kb1 Be6 12. f3 Nb4 13. a3 Rxa3
14. bxa3
Qxc3 15. axb4 Ra8 16. Rd3 Qxb4 17. Qd2 Qa3 18. Be2 Qa2+ 19. Kc1 Qa1+
20. Nxa1
Rxa1+ 21. Kb2 Rxh1 22. h3 Nc6 23. Rc3 Na5 24. Rxc7 h6 25. Qxd6 Rg1 26.
Qxb6 Nc6
27. Qxb7 Nd4 28. Bd3 g6 29. Qb8+ Kg7 30. Qa7 Nxc2 31. Qxg1 Nd4 32.
Qxd4+ Kf8
33. Qd8+ Kg7 34. Bc4 Bxc4 35. Rxc4 g5 36. Rc7 Kg6 37. Qd7 g4 38. Qxg4+
Kf6 39.
Qf5+ Kg7 40. Rxf7+ Kg8 41. Qg6+ Kh8 42. Qh7# 1-0


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Old June 15th 10, 01:21 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

raylopez99 wrote:
..
Can you see why?


Mostly I "saw" a dismal drop in interest (mine) after: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3
Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nb3 Qf6 6. Qe2

Can you er, "guess" why treeny ?

Note: A GetCrud "quality" game..

..


Actually at the time I thought resignation was sound too...until I
replayed it with Fritz.

You might say he forgot the rule: always check, it could be a mate (or
game saver!)

Kind of like those rules of practical wisdom that can go either way:
"the early bird gets the worm" (but what does the worm get for being
early? It gets eaten). Or: "Faint heart never won fair lady", but as
opposed to "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread".

RL

[Event "Rated game, 5m + 0s"]
[Site "Main Playing Hall"]
[Date "2010.06.13"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Ray"]
[Black "Andreas"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C45"]
[WhiteElo "1698"]
[BlackElo "1646"]
[PlyCount "83"]
[EventDate "2010.06.13"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nb3 Qf6 6. Qe2 Bb6 7.
Nc3 Nge7 8.
Be3 O-O 9. Bxb6 axb6 10. O-O-O d6 11. Kb1 Be6 12. f3 Nb4 13. a3 Rxa3
14. bxa3
Qxc3 15. axb4 Ra8 16. Rd3 Qxb4 17. Qd2 Qa3 18. Be2 Qa2+ 19. Kc1 Qa1+
20. Nxa1
Rxa1+ 21. Kb2 Rxh1 22. h3 Nc6 23. Rc3 Na5 24. Rxc7 h6 25. Qxd6 Rg1 26.
Qxb6 Nc6
27. Qxb7 Nd4 28. Bd3 g6 29. Qb8+ Kg7 30. Qa7 Nxc2 31. Qxg1 Nd4 32.
Qxd4+ Kf8
33. Qd8+ Kg7 34. Bc4 Bxc4 35. Rxc4 g5 36. Rc7 Kg6 37. Qd7 g4 38. Qxg4+
Kf6 39.
Qf5+ Kg7 40. Rxf7+ Kg8 41. Qg6+ Kh8 42. Qh7# 1-0

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Old June 16th 10, 01:08 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Find the *best* move...you'll never guess it, as there are othergood moves

On Jun 15, 3:21*am, micky wrote:
raylopez99 wrote:

.

Can you see why?


Mostly I "saw" a dismal drop in interest (mine) after: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3
Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Nxd4 Bc5 5. Nb3 Qf6 6. Qe2

Can you er, "guess" why treeny ?


No need to guess, just replay the game in Fritz. The black bishop was
hanging, so 6. NxB was correct.

RL
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