Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old August 22nd 10, 04:10 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 311
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

http://www.chesscafe.com/Tim/kibb.htm
  #2   Report Post  
Old August 22nd 10, 07:10 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
sd sd is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 922
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

On Aug 21, 10:10*pm, Mark Houlsby wrote:
http://www.chesscafe.com/Tim/kibb.htm



I remember when his 1974 book came out on the opening that he mentions
in the article, I was 17 and a class A player. A local junior expert
often played this line. At the time I "deeply" (sarcasm mode on!)
analyzed the Fraser defense with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4
Nxe4 5. d5 Bc5 (since all I wanted to do was attack anyway and I loved
off-beat responses). Needless to say, the local expert was well-
prepared and blew me away. He was even kind enough to tell me before
the game not to try my pet line against him. Live and learn.

I tried to find my original book and analysis (I always pencilled in
analysis in my books), mostly for a laugh for the group, but I can't
find it now. Some of my best "howlers" in analysis are in my old Jack
Spence series on Spielmann.

GM Kaufman's assessment of the opening, as given in Wikipedia, seems
accurate, though. It can be boringly drawish or wild, not fitting any
style except maybe correspondence players.

SBD
  #3   Report Post  
Old August 23rd 10, 01:13 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 311
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

On 22 Aug, 19:10, sd wrote:
On Aug 21, 10:10*pm, Mark Houlsby wrote:

http://www.chesscafe.com/Tim/kibb.htm


I remember when his 1974 book came out on the opening that he mentions
in the article, I was 17 and a class A player. A local junior expert
often played this line. At the time I "deeply" (sarcasm mode on!)
analyzed the Fraser defense with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4
Nxe4 5. d5 Bc5 (since all I wanted to do was attack anyway and I loved
off-beat responses). Needless to say, the local expert was well-
prepared and blew me away. He was even kind enough to tell me before
the game not to try my pet line against him. Live and learn.

I tried to find my original book and analysis (I always pencilled in
analysis in my books), mostly for a laugh for the group, but I can't
find it now. Some of my best "howlers" in analysis are in my old Jack
Spence series on Spielmann.

GM Kaufman's assessment of the opening, as given in Wikipedia, seems
accurate, though. It can be boringly drawish or wild, not fitting any
style except maybe correspondence players.

SBD


There is a class player of my acquaintance who does rather well with
it.

Used sparingly, of course.

MH
  #4   Report Post  
Old August 23rd 10, 02:03 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
sd sd is offline
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 922
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

On Aug 22, 7:13*pm, Mark Houlsby wrote:

There is a class player of my acquaintance who does rather well with
it.

Used sparingly, of course.


Do you mean the Ponz or the Fraser?

I certainly know a few "part-time" Ponziani players, who use it only
against certain types of players.

I think the Fraser is long dead, but I've been wrong before....

SBD
  #5   Report Post  
Old August 23rd 10, 01:29 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 311
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

On 23 Aug, 02:03, sd wrote:
On Aug 22, 7:13*pm, Mark Houlsby wrote:

There is a class player of my acquaintance who does rather well with
it.


Used sparingly, of course.


Do you mean the Ponz or the Fraser?


Ponziani's.


I certainly know a few "part-time" Ponziani players, who use it only
against certain types of players.


Exactly. Used sparingly.

I think the Fraser is long dead, but I've been wrong before....


I'm not sure, but I think that he thinks that, too.

SBD


MH


  #6   Report Post  
Old August 23rd 10, 03:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 3,256
Default Tim Harding on a neglected C44 opening...

On Aug 22, 2:10*pm, sd wrote:
On Aug 21, 10:10*pm, Mark Houlsby wrote:

http://www.chesscafe.com/Tim/kibb.htm


I remember when his 1974 book came out on the opening that he mentions
in the article, I was 17 and a class A player. A local junior expert
often played this line. At the time I "deeply" (sarcasm mode on!)
analyzed the Fraser defense with 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4
Nxe4 5. d5 Bc5 (since all I wanted to do was attack anyway and I loved
off-beat responses). Needless to say, the local expert was well-
prepared and blew me away. He was even kind enough to tell me before
the game not to try my pet line against him. Live and learn.

I tried to find my original book and analysis (I always pencilled in
analysis in my books), mostly for a laugh for the group, but I can't
find it now. Some of my best "howlers" in analysis are in my old Jack
Spence series on Spielmann.

GM Kaufman's assessment of the opening, as given in Wikipedia, seems
accurate, though. It can be boringly drawish or wild, not fitting any
style except maybe correspondence players.


MCO-10 (1965) said "The ancient Ponziani is almost extinct, although
occasionally an enterprising master like Bisguier will employ it for
surprise value." Yet checking my database, I find only one instance
where Bisguier played it, and the game was rather unenterprising on
both sides:

[Event "Wertheim mem"]
[Site "New York"]
[Date "1951.??.??"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Bisguier, Arthur Bernard"]
[Black "Euwe, Max"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "C44"]
[PlyCount "43"]
[EventDate "1951.??.??"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "11"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[Source "ChessBase"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. c3 Nf6 4. d4 d6 5. Bd3 g6 6. dxe5 Nxe5 7. Nxe5
dxe5 8. b3 Bg4 9. f3 Be6 10. Qe2 Nh5 11. g3 Qd7 12. Be3 O-O-O 13. Bc2
Qc6 14. O-O Bc5 15. Qf2 Bxe3 16. Qxe3 Qb6 17. Qxb6 axb6 18. Kf2 Rd6
19. Rd1 Rhd8 20. Ke2 Rc6 21. Rxd8+ Kxd8 22. Bd3 1/2-1/2

Checking for players rated 2500+, I found only two that played the
Ponziani much against opponents rated 2500+: Ljubojevic (five times
1973-78, once in 1995) and Velimirovic (ten times 1979-96). Others
trying it once or twice included Miles, Sax and Yusupov. Eyeballing
the list for pre-Elo greats, I noticed Bronstein, Barcza and Benko.


Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Strange Death of President Harding by Gaston B. Means foreword bySam Sloan samsloan rec.games.chess.analysis (Chess Analysis) 7 September 30th 08 08:04 PM
The Strange Death of President Harding by Gaston B. Means foreword bySam Sloan samsloan rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 7 September 30th 08 08:04 PM
The Strange Death of President Harding by Gaston B. Means foreword bySam Sloan samsloan rec.games.chess.misc (Chess General) 7 September 30th 08 08:04 PM
The President's Daughter by Nan Britton [email protected] rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 3 April 20th 08 12:07 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:01 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017