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Old September 7th 10, 03:43 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

True, black is a pawn down with no counterplay, but you'd think a
machine would never tire.

I think the humans decided to throw in the towel, probably after
consulting GMs on their side, to make the match more interesting to
the public.

RL

r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2 b - - 0 45

[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.16"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kasparov, G."]
[Black "X3D FRITZ"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2830"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[Source "Chess Today"]
[SourceDate "2003.11.18"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 c6 5. e3 a6 6. c5 Nbd7 7. b4 a5 8.
b5 e5 9.
Qa4 Qc7 10. Ba3 e4 11. Nd2 Be7 12. b6 Qd8 13. h3 O-O 14. Nb3 Bd6 15.
Rb1 Be7
16. Nxa5 Nb8 17. Bb4 Qd7 18. Rb2 Qe6 19. Qd1 Nfd7 20. a3 Qh6 21. Nb3
Bh4 22.
Qd2 Nf6 23. Kd1 Be6 24. Kc1 Rd8 25. Rc2 Nbd7 26. Kb2 Nf8 27. a4 Ng6
28. a5 Ne7
29. a6 bxa6 30. Na5 Rdb8 31. g3 Bg5 32. Bg2 Qg6 33. Ka1 Kh8 34. Na2
Bd7 35. Bc3
Ne8 36. Nb4 Kg8 37. Rb1 Bc8 38. Ra2 Bh6 39. Bf1 Qe6 40. Qd1 Nf6 41.
Qa4 Bb7 42.
Nxb7 Rxb7 43. Nxa6 Qd7 44. Qc2 Kh8 45. Rb3 1-0
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Old September 8th 10, 09:25 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

The game was won by Kasparov, black resigned in this position!
It's 1-0, not 0-1!

Cheers,

ZM

On 07/09/2010 16:43, raylopez99 wrote:
[Event "X3D Match"]
[Site "New York USA"]
[Date "2003.11.16"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Kasparov, G."]
[Black "X3D FRITZ"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D45"]
[WhiteElo "2830"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2003.11.11"]
[Source "Chess Today"]
[SourceDate "2003.11.18"]

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. d4 c6 5. e3 a6 6. c5 Nbd7 7. b4 a5 8.
b5 e5 9.
Qa4 Qc7 10. Ba3 e4 11. Nd2 Be7 12. b6 Qd8 13. h3 O-O 14. Nb3 Bd6 15.
Rb1 Be7
16. Nxa5 Nb8 17. Bb4 Qd7 18. Rb2 Qe6 19. Qd1 Nfd7 20. a3 Qh6 21. Nb3
Bh4 22.
Qd2 Nf6 23. Kd1 Be6 24. Kc1 Rd8 25. Rc2 Nbd7 26. Kb2 Nf8 27. a4 Ng6
28. a5 Ne7
29. a6 bxa6 30. Na5 Rdb8 31. g3 Bg5 32. Bg2 Qg6 33. Ka1 Kh8 34. Na2
Bd7 35. Bc3
Ne8 36. Nb4 Kg8 37. Rb1 Bc8 38. Ra2 Bh6 39. Bf1 Qe6 40. Qd1 Nf6 41.
Qa4 Bb7 42.
Nxb7 Rxb7 43. Nxa6 Qd7 44. Qc2 Kh8 45. Rb3 1-0


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Old September 8th 10, 09:36 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

Sorry, I mixed things up.

But the human, GK, had the white pieces in this game.

It's clearly won for White isn't it?
The b6 pawn is a monster, the black pieces are passive and white is
starting exchanges on the 'a' line, why should a computer (X3D Fritz)
continue? His evaluation of the position was probably +3.00 for white or
even worse. Toga II indicates already +1.70 after a few seconds.
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Old September 8th 10, 02:42 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

On Sep 8, 5:12*am, Sanny wrote:
On Sep 7, 7:43*pm, raylopez99 wrote:

True, black is a pawn down with no counterplay, but you'd think a
machine would never tire.


I analysed the game at GetClub. It also was unaware why black resign.


Things comparable to having GetClub analyze a Kasparov game:

Consulting an earthworm on astronomy
Kindergarteners grading final exams at Harvard Law School
Stevie Wonder as a judge on "Dancing with the Stars"
Marlee Matlin as a judge on "American Idol"
Helen Keller reviewing "Citizen Kane"
Asking a pig about an eagle's flying technique
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Old September 8th 10, 03:48 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

On 08.09.2010 15:42, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Sep 8, 5:12 am, wrote:
On Sep 7, 7:43 pm, wrote:

True, black is a pawn down with no counterplay, but you'd think a
machine would never tire.


I analysed the game at GetClub. It also was unaware why black resign.


Things comparable to having GetClub analyze a Kasparov game:

Consulting an earthworm on astronomy
Kindergarteners grading final exams at Harvard Law School
Stevie Wonder as a judge on "Dancing with the Stars"
Marlee Matlin as a judge on "American Idol"
Helen Keller reviewing "Citizen Kane"
Asking a pig about an eagle's flying technique


I was about to compile a similar list but it is pointless. Sanny just
will not get it.


@those who think Black should fight on:
what move would you suggest for Black to keep him in the game?


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Old September 8th 10, 04:14 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

On 08/09/2010 10:12, Sanny wrote:
On Sep 7, 7:43 pm, wrote:
True, black is a pawn down with no counterplay, but you'd think a
machine would never tire.


I analysed the game at GetClub. It also was unaware why black resign.


Not a great advert for it then. Although some major engines cannot see
into the first few moves properly until you play down the line a bit.

I think the humans decided to throw in the towel, probably after
consulting GMs on their side, to make the match more interesting to
the public.


Seems reasonable. It is pretty obvious to a human that no matter what
black does now white can double the rooks on the a-file and crash into
the queenside using the b6 pawn and doubled rooks as a battering ram.

Black is pretty much reduced to rearranging the deck chairs on the
Titanic. His ship has already struck the iceberg on b6.

White can get away with playing Nb4 then Rba3 or their transpose in
response to anything plausible that black can do here. Whilst Fritz and
Shredder10 only sees the start position at +1.60+/-0.12 for white.

Play a couple of moves down any line you like and the unfavourable
forced lines become visible to it. Black has Rg8/Re8 or slightly worse
g6/Rd8/Nfg8 and it doesn't matter which one gets played white is well
ahead. Engines don't always see these strategy based things.

Shredder starts to see the plot at tournament time controls after both
whites killer moves have been played (at ply 15 and 2-3 mins elapsed).
Kasparov had clearly won and the team were right to throw in the towel.

Regards,
Martin Brown
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Old September 8th 10, 09:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.analysis
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Default Why did Black resign in this position? r6k/1r1qnppp/NPp2n1b/2Pp4/3Pp3/1RB1P1PP/R1Q2P2/K4B2b - - 0 45

On Sep 8, 6:14*pm, Martin Brown
wrote:


Seems reasonable. It is pretty obvious to a human that no matter what
black does now white can double the rooks on the a-file and crash into
the queenside using the b6 pawn and doubled rooks as a battering ram.

Shredder starts to see the plot at tournament time controls after both
whites killer moves have been played (at ply 15 and 2-3 mins elapsed).
Kasparov had clearly won and the team were right to throw in the towel.


Right. Thanks for the comments Martin Brown. But I was merely
repeating a comment by GM Alexander Baburin, who also wondered by the
computer did not play on to the bitter end. Mind you, Baburin did not
say Black would win, but he astutely pointed out (in commentary on his
now defunct website Chess Today), that it's always possible White
could make a blunder.

Now, who to believe? Our own resident expert Taylor Kingston, a 1800
USCF (at best, or about 1700 Fide Elo) chess player? Or Grandmaster
A. Baburin?

I think I know the answer to that one. And it's not our TV trivia
expert TK.

RL
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