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Old February 6th 04, 08:32 PM
Gregory Topov
 
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Default Reason 2 - Why beginners should not resign....

In a game with intermediate/expert chess players, if you blunder away a
piece it usually makes good sense to resign because there is little doubt
that your opponent will use the advantage to win.
My theory is if the game is between beginners, however, you should *not*
resign in such positions (in blitz/rapid).


Two reasons:

REASON 1: It is not the person who blunders *first* who should lose, but the
person who blunders *most*.
Explanation in earlier thread he http://makeashorterlink.com/?C1EA13357
A winning example (with PGN game) :
http://makeashorterlink.com/?O21B42357
A losing example (with PGN game) :
http://makeashorterlink.com/?H22B12357

REASON 2: The clock is part of blitz/rapid chess.
Undertaking a blitz game is like accepting a contract to play a game in a
certain amount of time. Before the game starts, I'm stating that if I can't
win in the agreed amount of time, I deserve to forfeit the game. So even if
I'm ahead on material when my time is up, if I need more time than what was
agreed upon at the start, then I don't deserve to win. Otherwise there's
little point to having the clock! My opponent gets a cheap win, admittedly,
but it's fair enough given the agreed upon "contract" made when beginning
the game. For this reason, even if I'm in a losing position, if my opponent
is nearly out of time, I will continue playing and accept a win on time.
--
Gregory Topov
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"I don't necessarily agree with everything I say." - Marshall McLuhan


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Old February 10th 04, 07:03 PM
Curtist Thetford
 
Posts: n/a
Default Reason 2 - Why beginners should not resign....

As a beginner myself, I like to play on because even in lost positions,
because I can still learn a lot. I am still practicing calculating
variations in my head, looking for tactics, watching how my opponent
finishes off the game if it comes to an endgame etc. Personally even when I
have the winning edge myself, I feel cheated if I don't get the fun of
delivering checkmate. :-)

"Gregory Topov" wrote in message
. ..
In a game with intermediate/expert chess players, if you blunder away a
piece it usually makes good sense to resign because there is little doubt
that your opponent will use the advantage to win.
My theory is if the game is between beginners, however, you should *not*
resign in such positions (in blitz/rapid).


Two reasons:

REASON 1: It is not the person who blunders *first* who should lose, but

the
person who blunders *most*.
Explanation in earlier thread he http://makeashorterlink.com/?C1EA13357
A winning example (with PGN game) :
http://makeashorterlink.com/?O21B42357
A losing example (with PGN game) :
http://makeashorterlink.com/?H22B12357

REASON 2: The clock is part of blitz/rapid chess.
Undertaking a blitz game is like accepting a contract to play a game in a
certain amount of time. Before the game starts, I'm stating that if I

can't
win in the agreed amount of time, I deserve to forfeit the game. So even

if
I'm ahead on material when my time is up, if I need more time than what

was
agreed upon at the start, then I don't deserve to win. Otherwise there's
little point to having the clock! My opponent gets a cheap win,

admittedly,
but it's fair enough given the agreed upon "contract" made when beginning
the game. For this reason, even if I'm in a losing position, if my

opponent
is nearly out of time, I will continue playing and accept a win on time.
--
Gregory Topov
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"I don't necessarily agree with everything I say." - Marshall McLuhan




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