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Old July 26th 04, 07:46 PM
Swampi
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis please

I was wondering what people think of this game. I think i had a
strong opening and middlegame, but then went off course badly at the
start of the endgame. I was lucky to get in the game, never mind win
it.

26. ..e5 was a mistake - i think i should of kept it where it was and
immediate brung my king out. 38. ..a5 was dodgy as well - i was lucky
to get away with my opponent not pushing the passed pawn once my rook
was out the way.

I think my tactics and positional (open games) skill is near enough
complete now. I'm currently working on my endgame as this game shows
i need to Then after that maybe look at positional play in closed
games. If I ever get to master level then Ill start studying
openings. What do you lot think?

I'm looking for advice particular about the endgame. Things like
where I went wrong and where I can look for guides etc (I have the
fundamental chess endings book).

Another thing - what sort of level/rating do you think im at? And
therefore what things should I be studying?

Cheers.

[Event ""]
[Site ""]
[Date ""]
[Round ""]
[White ""]
[Black "Me"]
[Result "0-1"]

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Qc2 a6 5. d4 cxd4 6. Nxd4 e6 7. Be2
Qc7
8. Be3 Nbd7 9. O-O Nc5 10. Bd3 d5 11. exd5 Nxd3 12. Qxd3 Nxd5 13. Re1
Bd6 14. Nf3 O-O 15. Nbd2 Rd8 16. Rad1 Nxe3 17. Qxe3 b5 18. Ne4 Bb7 19.
Nxd6 Rxd6 20. Ne5 Rad8 21. Rd4 Rxd4 22. cxd4 Qd6 23. Rd1 Qd5 24. Qf3
Qxf3 25. Nxf3 Bxf3 26. gxf3 e5 27. d5 Kf8 28. Kg2 Ke7 29. Kg3 f5 30.
f4
exf4+ 31. Kxf4 g6 32. Kg5 Kf7 33. f4 Rd6 34. h4 Kg7 35. h5 h6+ 36. Kh4
Kf6 37. hxg6 Kxg6 38. b4 a5 39. bxa5 Ra6 40. d6 Rxa5 41. Rb1 Rxa2 42.
Rxb5 Rh2+ 43. Kg3 Rd2 44. Rb6 Kh5 45. Kf3 Kh4 0-1
  #2   Report Post  
Old July 29th 04, 12:15 AM
Oliver Maas
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis please

Hi,

26. ..e5 was a mistake - i think i should of kept it where it was and
immediate brung my king out. 38. ..a5 was dodgy as well - i was lucky
to get away with my opponent not pushing the passed pawn once my rook
was out the way.


a) Yes, 26... e5?! was probably not the best choice, better was f.ex. 26...
a5, keeping the control over d5.
However, 27... f5!? 28.Kg2 Kf7 29.Kg3 g5 (avoiding f4) was interesting.
30.f4! was good because White gets
rid of his doubled pawns. (30... e4!? 31.f3 e3!? was possible, but e3 is
weak) 38.b4! was good, Black doesnt have
any active moves anymore (except the "active" a5 which is bad).

b) 38... a5? followed by 39... Ra6?? was in fact losing, 41.d7 was an easy
win for white.
Better was a waiting move like 38... Rd7, but i think white has a clear
advantage (active rook supporting
his passed pawn, white king has some ideas like going via d4 to c5 or e5).

c) The end position looks more like a draw to me. Was this a Blitz game ?

My impression is you want to make some "forcing moves" (26... e5 with the
"threat" exd4, 38... a5 with the
"threat" axb4), but often it is necessary to find a long-term plan without
the need to make forcing moves each time.
In the position after move 25 i think a plan would have been activating the
king (maybe going for d5).

kind regards,

Oliver


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Old July 29th 04, 12:19 PM
Swampi
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis please

Thanks for that. Yeah it was a blitz game (25 minutes) - white ran
out of time in the end.
  #4   Report Post  
Old August 2nd 04, 08:48 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Please

On 30 Jul 2004 22:11:27 -0700, (Glenn 'Mac'
Frazier) wrote:

Is anyone willing to give some pointers out to an U1200? I've heavily
analyzed the following game on my own, but without outside opinions
from more skilled players like yourselves I'm at sea on a cloudy night
without a compass. I feel like I went from a slight edge starting
around move 11 to suddenly sliding down a steep slope by move twenty.

White: Frazier,Glenn M (1166)
Black: Sigma 6.0.3 (1400)
Event: Practice Game 97 s/move avg, Abington PA USA (9)
Date: 2004-07-30
Annotator: Frazier, Glenn M
(A04 Réti O)

1 e4 g6
2 Nf3 d6
3 g3

3 d3 Bg7 4 g3 c5 5 Bg2 Nc6 6 0-0 Nf6 7 Nbd2 0-0 8 Re1 d5 (8 ... Rb8 9
a4 +/= ) 9 a4 e6 10 Qe2 =

3 ... Bg4

I hate this move in the KIA. Always. Irrationally so.

4 Bg2 c5
5 d3 Bg7
6 Nbd2 Nc6
7 0-0 Nf6

(7 ... Qd7!?)

8 Re1 0-0
9 h3

Time to kick the bish.

9 ... Bd7

after
9 ... Bxf3 I would have played 10 Nxf3!?= over
(10 Qxf3=)

10 c3

His dark-square bishop has a vicious long diagonal to play with, and
this move aims in part at limiting that. It also can lead to freeing
of the bishop on c1 from guard duty after the knight vacates d2 and
the queen takes up residence on the second rank. Most importantly to
me in this game, though, was that it further limited Black's scope of
operations by taking away two possible squares for his knight on c6.

10 ... Qc7
11 a4

Grabbing some queenside space, but also making an outpost on c4 for my
knight. That knight's gotta get out of the c1-bishop's way soon, and
the other direction it often goes in the KIA is toward the castled
king, as in
11 Nf1;
11 Nc4 without the preparatory a2-a4 would never have occurred to me
during the game but could be part of a pivot, I suppose: 11 ... b5 12
Ne3 etc.

11 ... e5?

At first this move seemed frustrating to me, as closing down the
advance of my e-pawn turns this position into a rather cramped and
slow affair. However, it did open up a beautiful hole on d5 while
simultaneously making the pawn on d6 backwards and so a target.


I would have preferred to play ...b5 before White got in a4 and then
play e5, but Black's game is tenable. Generally having a backward
pawn is a weakness only when the file is semi-open. In the KIA White
often disrupts the Black position by pushing e4-e5 so preventing this
is not necessarily bad.

Moreover, with this move, Black shuts down his own fianchettoed
bishop.
11 ... a5 12 Nc4 = and the fight is still even.

12 Nc4 a6


12...a6?! is only going to encourage white to play a5 and then allow
the knight to make ouse of another hole at b6. Better was 12...b6! in
order to follow up with ...a6 and ...b5 as circumstances permit.

13 a5

Now b7 is available as a guerrilla hidout for my knight, too.

13 ... Be6
14 Nfd2 d5

Advancing the weak pawn to trade it off.

15 exd5 Nxd5

The target on d6 is no longer an issue for Black, but now the bishop
on g2 has huge scope and the pawns at c5 and 35 are at risk.

16 Ne4

Stopping the advance of the e-pawn. Block before striking. Also
simultaneously increasing pressure on c5. 16 ...

16 ... Qe7
17 Be3?!

17 Bg5 Bf6 18 Bh6 Rfd8 +/= doesn't seem to accomplish anything for me,
but the move I played feels weak despite the fact that my position on
the board after the exchange is still slightly superior, I think.


One try for advantage for White would be to play 17.Ng5.
Since Black's bishop is the only defender for the Nd5 he cannot move
it as a result White can gain the two bishops for himself with a nice
position:
a) 17...Rab8 18.f4 f6 19.Nxe6 Qxe6 20.fxe5 fxe5 21.Qxb3
(21....Kh8 22.Qa3 +/- White wins the c-pawn (22...Qe7 23.Bxd5))Rfd8
22.Nb6 Nf4 23.Qxe6+ Nxe6 +/= White is somewhat better due to having
the bishop pair and the Black's weak pawns at b7, c5 and e5.
b) 17...Rad8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 19.Qb3 Rab8 20.f4 Rfd8 21.fxe5 Nxe5
22.Bg5 f6 23.Nxe5 fxg5 24.Nxg6 Qxg6 25.Bxd5+ +/-
c) 17...Rfd8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 (18...fxe6 9.Qg4 Nf6 20.Qe2 Nd5 +/-
Black is going to have a hard time dfending the weak pawns on b7, c5
e6 and e5)19.Bxd5 Rxd5 20.Nb6 +/- White has won the exchange)


17 ... Nxe3
18 Rxe3 Rfd8


Wrong rook. Better was 18...Rad8 to pressure White's now backward and
weak d-pawn. Moving the a-rook eliminates any white threats of Nb6
attacking the a8-square. After 19.Qc2 Bxc4 20.dxc4 f5 21.Nd2 e4 and
Black is somewhat better because Black's e-pawn cramps White's
position. Note that 22.f3 fails to 22...Nb4 23.Qc1 (23.cxb4 Bd4! -+
or 23.Qd1 Qd6 24.cxb4 Qxd2 25.Qxd2 Rxd2 26.Rb3 Bxb2 -/+ Black is ofing
to up at least a pawn) Bh6 24.f4 Nd3 25.Qc2 g5 26.Nxe4 fxe4 27.Bxe4
Kh8 28.Re2 gxf4 29.Bxd3 Qd7 30.Be4 f3 31.Rh2 Be3+ 32.Kh1 Qd6 and Black
has a strong attack.

19 Ned6?

This move was ridiculously attractive, as it appears to be
simultaneously attacking b7, d6, and e5, and also defending c4.
19 Nb6 gives up a little of the grip on Black's heart (d6) but has as
an advantage that it is a really annoying move. 19 ... Rab8 20 Qc2 Bh6
21 Re2 +/=

19 ... Rxd6
20 Nxd6 Qxd6

The tables are turned, and now Black has an edge. It's not just the
slight and technical material advantage of bish and knight over rook;
the second bishop along with the pressure on the weak d3 pawn add up
to increased flexibilty and opportunity. Additionally, the a5 pawn is
now a liability; it will hang if the a1 rook tries to double up on the
d- or e-files, and the b-pawn isn't coming to the rescue for fear of
getting an iso on d3 with so many of my pieces off the board.

21 Qc2 Bd5?!

Trading down to increase the effect of a material advantage makes
sense, as does taking out my most aggressively posted piece, but I'm
not certain it's worth giving up the two-bishops advantage for.

22 Bxd5 Qxd5
23 Ra4?

This move makes little sense. I was trying to solve for both the weak
a-pawn and the need to block the black pawn on e5, with the fantasy
notion of tripling up on the e-file with rooks on the fourth and third
ranks and the queen on e2. The problem is that while it keeps its eye
on a5, it does nothing to solve the problem of how to get off the
a-file.
23 c4 Qd6 24 Qd2 transfers guard duty from the a1-rook to the queen,
allowing the rook to slid on over to join its mate on the e-file. I
considered this, but was reluctant to allow 24 ... Nb4 =/+


23.c4 Qd6 24.Qd2? Bh6! and White loses more material.
After 23.c4 Black had a better reply 23...Qd7! attacking the h3-pawn.
Then 24.Kg2 Rd8 and Black wins the d-pawn without much trouble.


23 ... Rd8!

The d3 pawn is doomed, but I don't see it yet.

24 Kh2?

What's better? This improves my position, as the h3 pawn was
unprotected and the backrank could become dangerous in a short while.
More significantly, I'm practicaly in zugzwang as anything else opens
me up for invasion. Given Black's next move, though, a more prudent
approach would have been
24 c4 Qd6


Once again 24...Qd7! is better and leads to winnign either the d- or
h-pawns.

25 Ra3 so that after 25 ... Bh6 the pawn doesn't fall. Of
course, that opens things up for invasion: 26 Re1 Nd4 -/+ etc.

24 ... Bh6
25 Rf3??

(I was allowing myself to be distracted by other things at the time;
in fact, I was guilty of this for several moves up to the end, and it
shows. I've got to become more disciplined.)
25 Re1 Qxd3 -/+ or ;
25 Re2 Qxd3 -/+ would still be rough for white, but not nearly so
bone-headedly outright disastrously lost.


Dropping the rook just makes the end quick. After retreating the rook
White is still lost; it takes a little longer, e.g. 25.Re2 Qxd3
26.Qxd3 Rxd3 and looking at this postions we see:
*White is down the equivalent of two pawns in material
*Black owns the only open file (d-file)
*White has to leave a rook on the a-file or lose another pawn
*White cannot stop Black's plan of playing f5, centralizing his king
(to say d5) and redeploying he bishop to provide a second attack on
the a5-pawn.


25 ... Qxf3 0-1

Any and all comments beyond "You hung your rook you patzer!" will be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!

--
Glenn "Mac" (not "spam") Frazier
USCF #12721233
"Frazier" on FICS
"GMF" on RedHotPawn.com


  #5   Report Post  
Old August 6th 04, 12:37 AM
My name is Mac, not Spam
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Please

in article , Mike Ogush at
wrote on 8/2/04 3:48 PM:

On 30 Jul 2004 22:11:27 -0700,
(Glenn 'Mac'
Frazier) wrote:

Is anyone willing to give some pointers out to an U1200? I've heavily
analyzed the following game on my own, but without outside opinions
from more skilled players like yourselves I'm at sea on a cloudy night
without a compass. I feel like I went from a slight edge starting
around move 11 to suddenly sliding down a steep slope by move twenty.

White: Frazier,Glenn M (1166)
Black: Sigma 6.0.3 (1400)
Event: Practice Game 97 s/move avg, Abington PA USA (9)
Date: 2004-07-30
Annotator: Frazier, Glenn M
(A04 Réti O)

1 e4 g6
2 Nf3 d6
3 g3


[snip]

16 ... Qe7
17 Be3?!

17 Bg5 Bf6 18 Bh6 Rfd8 +/= doesn't seem to accomplish anything for me,
but the move I played feels weak despite the fact that my position on
the board after the exchange is still slightly superior, I think.


One try for advantage for White would be to play 17.Ng5.
Since Black's bishop is the only defender for the Nd5 he cannot move
it as a result White can gain the two bishops for himself with a nice
position:
a) 17...Rab8 18.f4 f6 19.Nxe6 Qxe6 20.fxe5 fxe5 21.Qxb3
(21....Kh8 22.Qa3 +/- White wins the c-pawn (22...Qe7 23.Bxd5))Rfd8
22.Nb6 Nf4 23.Qxe6+ Nxe6 +/= White is somewhat better due to having
the bishop pair and the Black's weak pawns at b7, c5 and e5.
b) 17...Rad8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 19.Qb3 Rab8 20.f4 Rfd8 21.fxe5 Nxe5
22.Bg5 f6 23.Nxe5 fxg5 24.Nxg6 Qxg6 25.Bxd5+ +/-
c) 17...Rfd8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 (18...fxe6 9.Qg4 Nf6 20.Qe2 Nd5 +/-
Black is going to have a hard time dfending the weak pawns on b7, c5
e6 and e5)19.Bxd5 Rxd5 20.Nb6 +/- White has won the exchange)


Great suggestion. Thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for.

17 ... Nxe3
18 Rxe3 Rfd8


[snip]

22 Bxd5 Qxd5
23 Ra4?

This move makes little sense. I was trying to solve for both the weak
a-pawn and the need to block the black pawn on e5, with the fantasy
notion of tripling up on the e-file with rooks on the fourth and third
ranks and the queen on e2. The problem is that while it keeps its eye
on a5, it does nothing to solve the problem of how to get off the
a-file.
23 c4 Qd6 24 Qd2 transfers guard duty from the a1-rook to the queen,
allowing the rook to slid on over to join its mate on the e-file. I
considered this, but was reluctant to allow 24 ... Nb4 =/+


23.c4 Qd6 24.Qd2? Bh6! and White loses more material.
After 23.c4 Black had a better reply 23...Qd7! attacking the h3-pawn.
Then 24.Kg2 Rd8 and Black wins the d-pawn without much trouble.


23 ... Rd8!

The d3 pawn is doomed, but I don't see it yet.

24 Kh2?

What's better? This improves my position, as the h3 pawn was
unprotected and the backrank could become dangerous in a short while.
More significantly, I'm practicaly in zugzwang as anything else opens
me up for invasion. Given Black's next move, though, a more prudent
approach would have been
24 c4 Qd6


Once again 24...Qd7! is better and leads to winnign either the d- or
h-pawns.

25 Ra3 so that after 25 ... Bh6 the pawn doesn't fall. Of
course, that opens things up for invasion: 26 Re1 Nd4 -/+ etc.


It's funny how one develops blind spots. Concern for the h-pawn obviously
wasn't at the front of my mind, when playing or when analyzing this game.
You're right, though, in both instances.

I'm still looking for an improvement to my own play in this position. 23.Ra4
was wrong, and 23.c4 Qd7! drops material...so do I have a better move on 23?
Or is my position sliding irrevocably by this point in the game?

24 ... Bh6
25 Rf3??

(I was allowing myself to be distracted by other things at the time;
in fact, I was guilty of this for several moves up to the end, and it
shows. I've got to become more disciplined.)
25 Re1 Qxd3 -/+ or ;
25 Re2 Qxd3 -/+ would still be rough for white, but not nearly so
bone-headedly outright disastrously lost.


Dropping the rook just makes the end quick. After retreating the rook
White is still lost; it takes a little longer, e.g. 25.Re2 Qxd3
26.Qxd3 Rxd3 and looking at this postions we see:
*White is down the equivalent of two pawns in material
*Black owns the only open file (d-file)
*White has to leave a rook on the a-file or lose another pawn
*White cannot stop Black's plan of playing f5, centralizing his king
(to say d5) and redeploying he bishop to provide a second attack on
the a5-pawn.


25 ... Qxf3 0-1

Any and all comments beyond "You hung your rook you patzer!" will be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!


Thank you very much, Mike, for these comments as well as the rest of your
analysis. I've added them to my PGN of the game for further educational
value next time I go through my games.


--
Glenn 'Mac' Frazier
USCF#12721233, FICS:'Frazier', RedHotPawn.com:'GMF'
mailto: [ my 3-letter name ] @thefraziers.org,
http://mac.thefraziers.org/





  #6   Report Post  
Old August 10th 04, 07:51 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Analysis Please

On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:37:55 -0400, "My name is Mac, not Spam"
wrote:

in article , Mike Ogush at
wrote on 8/2/04 3:48 PM:

On 30 Jul 2004 22:11:27 -0700,
(Glenn 'Mac'
Frazier) wrote:

Is anyone willing to give some pointers out to an U1200? I've heavily
analyzed the following game on my own, but without outside opinions
from more skilled players like yourselves I'm at sea on a cloudy night
without a compass. I feel like I went from a slight edge starting
around move 11 to suddenly sliding down a steep slope by move twenty.

White: Frazier,Glenn M (1166)
Black: Sigma 6.0.3 (1400)
Event: Practice Game 97 s/move avg, Abington PA USA (9)
Date: 2004-07-30
Annotator: Frazier, Glenn M
(A04 Réti O)

1 e4 g6
2 Nf3 d6
3 g3


[snip]

16 ... Qe7
17 Be3?!

17 Bg5 Bf6 18 Bh6 Rfd8 +/= doesn't seem to accomplish anything for me,
but the move I played feels weak despite the fact that my position on
the board after the exchange is still slightly superior, I think.


One try for advantage for White would be to play 17.Ng5.
Since Black's bishop is the only defender for the Nd5 he cannot move
it as a result White can gain the two bishops for himself with a nice
position:
a) 17...Rab8 18.f4 f6 19.Nxe6 Qxe6 20.fxe5 fxe5 21.Qxb3
(21....Kh8 22.Qa3 +/- White wins the c-pawn (22...Qe7 23.Bxd5))Rfd8
22.Nb6 Nf4 23.Qxe6+ Nxe6 +/= White is somewhat better due to having
the bishop pair and the Black's weak pawns at b7, c5 and e5.
b) 17...Rad8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 19.Qb3 Rab8 20.f4 Rfd8 21.fxe5 Nxe5
22.Bg5 f6 23.Nxe5 fxg5 24.Nxg6 Qxg6 25.Bxd5+ +/-
c) 17...Rfd8 18.Nxe6 Qxe6 (18...fxe6 9.Qg4 Nf6 20.Qe2 Nd5 +/-
Black is going to have a hard time dfending the weak pawns on b7, c5
e6 and e5)19.Bxd5 Rxd5 20.Nb6 +/- White has won the exchange)


Great suggestion. Thanks. That's exactly what I was looking for.

17 ... Nxe3
18 Rxe3 Rfd8


[snip]

22 Bxd5 Qxd5
23 Ra4?

This move makes little sense. I was trying to solve for both the weak
a-pawn and the need to block the black pawn on e5, with the fantasy
notion of tripling up on the e-file with rooks on the fourth and third
ranks and the queen on e2. The problem is that while it keeps its eye
on a5, it does nothing to solve the problem of how to get off the
a-file.
23 c4 Qd6 24 Qd2 transfers guard duty from the a1-rook to the queen,
allowing the rook to slid on over to join its mate on the e-file. I
considered this, but was reluctant to allow 24 ... Nb4 =/+


23.c4 Qd6 24.Qd2? Bh6! and White loses more material.
After 23.c4 Black had a better reply 23...Qd7! attacking the h3-pawn.
Then 24.Kg2 Rd8 and Black wins the d-pawn without much trouble.


23 ... Rd8!

The d3 pawn is doomed, but I don't see it yet.

24 Kh2?

What's better? This improves my position, as the h3 pawn was
unprotected and the backrank could become dangerous in a short while.
More significantly, I'm practicaly in zugzwang as anything else opens
me up for invasion. Given Black's next move, though, a more prudent
approach would have been
24 c4 Qd6


Once again 24...Qd7! is better and leads to winnign either the d- or
h-pawns.

25 Ra3 so that after 25 ... Bh6 the pawn doesn't fall. Of
course, that opens things up for invasion: 26 Re1 Nd4 -/+ etc.


It's funny how one develops blind spots. Concern for the h-pawn obviously
wasn't at the front of my mind, when playing or when analyzing this game.
You're right, though, in both instances.

I'm still looking for an improvement to my own play in this position. 23.Ra4
was wrong, and 23.c4 Qd7! drops material...so do I have a better move on 23?
Or is my position sliding irrevocably by this point in the game?


Your position was already lost (with best play by Black) once you
played 19.Ned6. This is not so much because White gives up two pieces
for a rook, but because:
* after the knights are gone white will be unable to defend the weak
pawns at a5 and d3. [After the bishops were exchanged white had
additional undefended pawns at h3 that Black could threaten. ]
* In order to be effective attackers rooks need open (or at least
half-open) files to work on. White's rooks only have the e-file to
use and black can stop all threats to the e5-pawn with f6.
* White's knights prevented Black from attacking the weak pawns at a5
and d3. Black's queen and rook cannot double on the d-file after
19.Nb6 - there are no unattacked squares for the queen. ...Qc7 hangs
the pawn at c5 to the knight at e4.


24 ... Bh6
25 Rf3??

(I was allowing myself to be distracted by other things at the time;
in fact, I was guilty of this for several moves up to the end, and it
shows. I've got to become more disciplined.)
25 Re1 Qxd3 -/+ or ;
25 Re2 Qxd3 -/+ would still be rough for white, but not nearly so
bone-headedly outright disastrously lost.


Dropping the rook just makes the end quick. After retreating the rook
White is still lost; it takes a little longer, e.g. 25.Re2 Qxd3
26.Qxd3 Rxd3 and looking at this postions we see:
*White is down the equivalent of two pawns in material
*Black owns the only open file (d-file)
*White has to leave a rook on the a-file or lose another pawn
*White cannot stop Black's plan of playing f5, centralizing his king
(to say d5) and redeploying he bishop to provide a second attack on
the a5-pawn.


25 ... Qxf3 0-1

Any and all comments beyond "You hung your rook you patzer!" will be
greatly appreciated. Thanks!


Thank you very much, Mike, for these comments as well as the rest of your
analysis. I've added them to my PGN of the game for further educational
value next time I go through my games.


--
Glenn 'Mac' Frazier
USCF#12721233, FICS:'Frazier', RedHotPawn.com:'GMF'
mailto: [ my 3-letter name ] @thefraziers.org,
http://mac.thefraziers.org/




  #7   Report Post  
Old August 15th 04, 06:52 AM
My name is Mac, not Spam
 
Posts: n/a
Default

in article , Mike Ogush at
wrote on 8/10/04 2:51 PM:

On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 19:37:55 -0400, "My name is Mac, not Spam"
wrote:

in article
, Mike Ogush at
wrote on 8/2/04 3:48 PM:

On 30 Jul 2004 22:11:27 -0700,
(Glenn 'Mac'
Frazier) wrote:


25 Ra3 so that after 25 ... Bh6 the pawn doesn't fall. Of
course, that opens things up for invasion: 26 Re1 Nd4 -/+ etc.


It's funny how one develops blind spots. Concern for the h-pawn obviously
wasn't at the front of my mind, when playing or when analyzing this game.
You're right, though, in both instances.

I'm still looking for an improvement to my own play in this position. 23.Ra4
was wrong, and 23.c4 Qd7! drops material...so do I have a better move on 23?
Or is my position sliding irrevocably by this point in the game?


Your position was already lost (with best play by Black) once you
played 19.Ned6. This is not so much because White gives up two pieces
for a rook, but because:
* after the knights are gone white will be unable to defend the weak
pawns at a5 and d3. [After the bishops were exchanged white had
additional undefended pawns at h3 that Black could threaten. ]
* In order to be effective attackers rooks need open (or at least
half-open) files to work on. White's rooks only have the e-file to
use and black can stop all threats to the e5-pawn with f6.
* White's knights prevented Black from attacking the weak pawns at a5
and d3. Black's queen and rook cannot double on the d-file after
19.Nb6 - there are no unattacked squares for the queen. ...Qc7 hangs
the pawn at c5 to the knight at e4.


Thanks! This sort of analysis is more helpful than the typical strings of
tactical variations (which also may be useful at times) because it carries
with it principles illustrated that may be reapplied over and over again.

I get what you're saying. In the game, I did something I am trying to train
myself out of: I ignored *why* different pieces have different traditional
"point values".


--
Glenn 'Mac' Frazier
USCF#12721233, FICS:'Frazier', RedHotPawn.com:'GMF'
mailto: [ my 3-letter name ] @thefraziers.org,
http://mac.thefraziers.org/



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