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Old August 3rd 04, 05:38 PM
Toni Lassila
 
Posts: n/a
Default Positional analysis requested

This game doesn't really have tactical fireworks so I concentrated on
trying to evaluate the positional aspects. Please share your views and
correct any mistakes I've made in my evaluations. I had the black
pieces.

[Event "Let's play chess"]
[Site "http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?bd=1939659"]
[Date "2004.07.08"]
[White "kin_2"]
[Black "azaris"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1504"]
[BlackElo "1593"]
[TimeControl "1/259200"]
[Mode "ICS"]
[Termination "normal"]

1. c4 Nf6 2. e3!?

{ Interesting choice of opening, the reversed Sicilian. Note the
immediate weakness of d3 resembling the d6 weakness of the Sicilian.
Likewise, play will be centered on the d-file from almost the very
beginning. }

2...e6 3. a3

{ White wants to avoid the pin on c3. But now the square b3 is weak as
well, which can't be good. Nc3, d4 or even b3 would have been more to
the point here. }

3...d5

{ Staking a further hold on e4, White continues with the reversed
Sicilian theme and opens the c-file. }

4. cxd5 exd5

{ 4...Nxd5?! 5. e4 Nf6 6. Nf3! (Black can't capture on e4 due to
6...Nxe4?? 7. Qa4+ losing a piece) and White will soon play d4 to
regain the upper hand. }

5. Nc3 Be7 6. d3

{ 6. d4!? would enable Bd3 but leaves e4 weak. Furthermore, White must
consider the eventual break c5 from Black. The text move leaves White
struggling to activate his pieces. }

6...Be6 7. Nf3 c5!

{ Begins pressure on d4, where Black will soon strike. White is still
struggling to untangle the mess his poor handling of the opening got
him into and is in no condition to respond to this central strike.
Instead he performs a diversion on the king side to win the two
bishops. }

8. Ng5!?

{ Better was 8. d4!, where 8...c4 locks Black's central pawns in place
and 8...cxd4 9. Nxd4 leaves White with two lovely central knights. }

8...O-O 9. Nxe6 fxe6

{ The dangerous light-squared bishop is gone, but now Black has a
formidable looking pawn center. White still has nothing ready to
challenge this fact. }

10. Bd2 Nc6 11. Be2

{ White has entered a hedhehog-like position while Black has all but
completed his development. The next move fires off the middlegame
struggle. }

11...d4!

{ The following exchanges are forced, as 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. dxe4 d3 14.
Bf1 c4 is hopeless for White. }

12. exd4 cxd4 13. Ne4

{ 13. Na2 looks ridiculously passive. }

13...Nxe4 14. dxe4

{ The pay for Black's troubles is a passed pawn. To make it supported,
he must play e5 but not immediately without preparations (14...e5? 15.
Qb3+ Kh8 16. Qxb7). }

14...Kh8

{ Removing the threat of queen check. }

15. Bd3 e5 16. O-O Bg5

{ As the pawns on d4 and e5 are locked for now, the bishop is on it's
way of becoming a bad bishop and Black offers to trade. }

17. Bxg5 Qxg5 18. Qc1!?

{ White offers the queen trade to gain control of the c-file. Black
accepts, perhaps too eagerly because complications await for him. }

18...Qxc1 19. Raxc1

{ White threatens b4, b5 and Rc7. }

19...Rad8 20. b4 Nb8?

{ The calm 20...h6 21. b5 Na5 was called for here. White wins at least
a pawn because of back rank threats. }

21. Rc7 Rd7 22. Rfc1 Rdd8

{ Incorrect would have been 22...Rfd8? 23. Rxd7 Nxd7 24. Rc7 as now
the rook is no longer on the c-file and Black has no compensation for
the pawn. }

23. Rxb7 Rdc8 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25. Rxa7?!

{ Greedy and unnecessary. }

25...Rc1+!?

{ Black has to come up with something to save the game and this is the
last shot effort. }

26. Bf1 h6 27. Re7 Nc6 28. Rc7 d3 29. g3?

{ Loses almost immediately. White suddenly realizes he has nothing to
stop the d-pawn from queening. The only try was 29. Rxc6 Rxc6 30. Bxd3
Rc3 and White should draw with his king side pawn mass. }

29...d2 30. Rd7 Nd4!

{ Devastating interception of the file and White has nothing left. }

31. Kg2 d1=Q 0-1

{ Trying to save the bishop leads to a forced mate: 32. Ba6 Qf3+ 33.
Kh3 Rg1 and there is no defense against Qh5#. }

--
King's Gambit - http://kingsgambit.blogspot.com
Chess problems, tactics, analysis and more.
  #2   Report Post  
Old August 3rd 04, 10:32 PM
Mike Ogush
 
Posts: n/a
Default Positional analysis requested

On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 19:38:53 +0300, Toni Lassila
wrote:

This game doesn't really have tactical fireworks so I concentrated on
trying to evaluate the positional aspects. Please share your views and
correct any mistakes I've made in my evaluations. I had the black
pieces.

[Event "Let's play chess"]
[Site "http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?bd=1939659"]
[Date "2004.07.08"]
[White "kin_2"]
[Black "azaris"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1504"]
[BlackElo "1593"]
[TimeControl "1/259200"]
[Mode "ICS"]
[Termination "normal"]

1. c4 Nf6 2. e3!?

{ Interesting choice of opening, the reversed Sicilian. Note the
immediate weakness of d3 resembling the d6 weakness of the Sicilian.
Likewise, play will be centered on the d-file from almost the very
beginning. }

2...e6 3. a3

{ White wants to avoid the pin on c3. But now the square b3 is weak as
well, which can't be good. Nc3, d4 or even b3 would have been more to
the point here. }

3...d5

{ Staking a further hold on e4, White continues with the reversed
Sicilian theme and opens the c-file. }

4. cxd5 exd5

{ 4...Nxd5?! 5. e4 Nf6 6. Nf3! (Black can't capture on e4 due to
6...Nxe4?? 7. Qa4+ losing a piece) and White will soon play d4 to
regain the upper hand. }

5. Nc3 Be7 6. d3

{ 6. d4!? would enable Bd3 but leaves e4 weak. Furthermore, White must
consider the eventual break c5 from Black. The text move leaves White
struggling to activate his pieces. }

6...Be6


I prefer 6...O-O 7.Nf3 c5 8.Be2 Nc6 9.O-O Bf5

The minor problem with developing the bishop so early (6...Be6) is
that it isn't clear yet what the best square for the bishop is.

7. Nf3 c5!

{ Begins pressure on d4, where Black will soon strike. White is still
struggling to untangle the mess his poor handling of the opening got
him into and is in no condition to respond to this central strike.
Instead he performs a diversion on the king side to win the two
bishops. }

8. Ng5!?

{ Better was 8. d4!, where 8...c4 locks Black's central pawns in place
and 8...cxd4 9. Nxd4 leaves White with two lovely central knights. }

8...O-O 9. Nxe6 fxe6

{ The dangerous light-squared bishop is gone, but now Black has a
formidable looking pawn center. White still has nothing ready to
challenge this fact. }

10. Bd2 Nc6 11. Be2

{ White has entered a hedhehog-like position while Black has all but
completed his development. The next move fires off the middlegame
struggle. }

11...d4!

{ The following exchanges are forced, as 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. dxe4 d3 14.
Bf1 c4 is hopeless for White. }

12. exd4 cxd4


12...Nxd4!? 13.Be3 Qb6 14.Rb1 Rad8 15.O-O Bd6 16.Bxd4 [not 16.Bg4 Kh8
17.Re1 Nc2! 18.Qxc2 Nxg4 and Black has a small advantage because of
the half-open f-file and the open diagonals directed to White's king.]
16...cxd4 17.Ne4 Nxe4 18.dxe4 Bf4 19.g3 Bh6 when Black can control
the c-file but has the problem of opposite colored bishops. I think
that this position is slightly in black's favor.

13. Ne4

{ 13. Na2 looks ridiculously passive. }

13...Nxe4 14. dxe4

{ The pay for Black's troubles is a passed pawn. To make it supported,
he must play e5 but not immediately without preparations (14...e5? 15.
Qb3+ Kh8 16. Qxb7). }

14...Kh8

{ Removing the threat of queen check. }


I think that 14...Qb6 with the threat of ...d3 might be better. After
15.Bg4 Ne5 16.O-O Rf7 17.b4 Raf8 and Black has strong intiative on the
king-side. The idea of playing ...e5 as was done in the game doesn't
seem to get more than equality.


15. Bd3 e5 16. O-O Bg5

{ As the pawns on d4 and e5 are locked for now, the bishop is on it's
way of becoming a bad bishop and Black offers to trade. }

17. Bxg5 Qxg5 18. Qc1!?

{ White offers the queen trade to gain control of the c-file. Black
accepts, perhaps too eagerly because complications await for him. }

18...Qxc1


A better try for advantage is 18...Qf6 19.Qd2 Rac8 20.Rac1 a6 although
I don't think Black has much.

19. Raxc1

{ White threatens b4, b5 and Rc7. }

19...Rad8


19....Rac8! = contesting the c-file. Since it is unlikely that Black
will dislodge the blockader of the d-pawn any time soon, he should be
thinking of activating his rooks on open or semi-open files and or at
least making sure that white doesn't dominate those files.

20. b4 Nb8?

{ The calm 20...h6 21. b5 Na5 was called for here. White wins at least
a pawn because of back rank threats. }

21. Rc7 Rd7 22. Rfc1 Rdd8

{ Incorrect would have been 22...Rfd8? 23. Rxd7 Nxd7 24. Rc7 as now
the rook is no longer on the c-file and Black has no compensation for
the pawn. }

23. Rxb7 Rdc8 24. Rxc8 Rxc8 25. Rxa7?!

{ Greedy and unnecessary. }


25.Rxa7 is not the absolute best move (e.g. 25.b5!), but is it is not
a dubious move either. It just needed to be followed up correctly.

25...Rc1+!?

{ Black has to come up with something to save the game and this is the
last shot effort. }

26. Bf1 h6 27. Re7


27.Ra8! Rc8 28.b5 +- Black cannot stop queenside pawns without
material loss, due to the awkward position of his pieces.

Nc6 28. Rc7


28.Rd7 Ra1 29.g3 and if 29...Rxa3 30.b5 Nb4 (30...Na5 31.Ra7 d3
32.Rd7! +-) 31.Rd8+ Kh7 32.b6 +-

d3 29. g3?

{ Loses almost immediately. White suddenly realizes he has nothing to
stop the d-pawn from queening. The only try was 29. Rxc6 Rxc6 30. Bxd3
Rc3 and White should draw with his king side pawn mass. }

29...d2 30. Rd7 Nd4!

{ Devastating interception of the file and White has nothing left. }

31. Kg2 d1=Q 0-1

{ Trying to save the bishop leads to a forced mate: 32. Ba6 Qf3+ 33.
Kh3 Rg1 and there is no defense against Qh5#. }

--
King's Gambit - http://kingsgambit.blogspot.com
Chess problems, tactics, analysis and more.


  #3   Report Post  
Old August 4th 04, 01:45 AM
Mark S. Hathaway
 
Posts: n/a
Default Positional analysis requested

Toni Lassila wrote:

This game doesn't really have tactical fireworks so I concentrated on
trying to evaluate the positional aspects. Please share your views and
correct any mistakes I've made in my evaluations. I had the black
pieces.


Don't fool yourself. There can be tactical
possibilities in what appears to be the quietest
of games.


[Event "Let's play chess"]
[Site "http://gameknot.com/chess.pl?bd=1939659"]
[Date "2004.07.08"]
[White "kin_2"]
[Black "azaris"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "1504"]
[BlackElo "1593"]
[TimeControl "1/259200"]
[Mode "ICS"]
[Termination "normal"]

1. c4 Nf6 2. e3!?

{ Interesting choice of opening, the reversed Sicilian. Note the
immediate weakness of d3 resembling the d6 weakness of the Sicilian.
Likewise, play will be centered on the d-file from almost the very
beginning. }


It isn't so noticable when the d-file is closed.

2...e6 3. a3

{ White wants to avoid the pin on c3. But now the square b3 is weak as
well, which can't be good. Nc3, d4 or even b3 would have been more to
the point here. }


Black's pieces don't reach toward b3 very well, so
White is alright.

3...d5

{ Staking a further hold on e4, White continues with the reversed
Sicilian theme and opens the c-file. }

4. cxd5 exd5

{ 4...Nxd5?! 5. e4 Nf6 6. Nf3! (Black can't capture on e4 due to
6...Nxe4?? 7. Qa4+ losing a piece) and White will soon play d4 to
regain the upper hand. }

5. Nc3 Be7


White probably shouldn't have opened the e-file
for Black, but Black could take better advantage
at this move with...

5...c6
6...Bd6

6. d3

{ 6. d4!? would enable Bd3 but leaves e4 weak. Furthermore, White must
consider the eventual break c5 from Black. The text move leaves White
struggling to activate his pieces. }


Yes.

6...Be6 7. Nf3 c5!


This plan is more aggressive than the one with ...c6.
Thus Black should secure his king with

6...O-O

before

7...c5

and then developing Bc8 more aggressively if
possible, though e6 is alright.

White struggles to maintain equality.

{ Begins pressure on d4, where Black will soon strike. White is still
struggling to untangle the mess his poor handling of the opening got
him into and is in no condition to respond to this central strike.
Instead he performs a diversion on the king side to win the two
bishops. }

8. Ng5!?

{ Better was 8. d4!, where 8...c4 locks Black's central pawns in place
and 8...cxd4 9. Nxd4 leaves White with two lovely central knights. }


I think 8. d4 isn't right because it costs time.
IMO, he should develop with b2-b3, Bc1-b2, Bf1-e2, O-O
and try to brake Black's growing initiative.

8...O-O 9. Nxe6 fxe6

{ The dangerous light-squared bishop is gone, but now Black has a
formidable looking pawn center. White still has nothing ready to
challenge this fact. }

10. Bd2 Nc6 11. Be2

{ White has entered a hedhehog-like position while Black has all but
completed his development. The next move fires off the middlegame
struggle. }

11...d4!

{ The following exchanges are forced, as 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. dxe4 d3 14.
Bf1 c4 is hopeless for White. }

12. exd4 cxd4 13. Ne4

{ 13. Na2 looks ridiculously passive. }

13...Nxe4 14. dxe4

{ The pay for Black's troubles is a passed pawn. To make it supported,
he must play e5 but not immediately without preparations (14...e5? 15.
Qb3+ Kh8 16. Qxb7). }

14...Kh8

{ Removing the threat of queen check. }


Maybe 14...d3 15. Be2-? Nc6-d4-c2+

Or 14...Qb6 15. Rb1 e5

15. Bd3 e5 16. O-O Bg5


Good move.

{ As the pawns on d4 and e5 are locked for now, the bishop is on it's
way of becoming a bad bishop and Black offers to trade. }

17. Bxg5 Qxg5 18. Qc1!?

{ White offers the queen trade to gain control of the c-file. Black
accepts, perhaps too eagerly because complications await for him. }

18...Qxc1


Avoiding the trade with

18...Qh4

is probably better because White has a lot
of work to do to activate his pieces while
Black can immediately threaten Kg1 with ...Rf8-f6-h6

19. Raxc1


It's close to equal again, despite pawn d4.

{ White threatens b4, b5 and Rc7. }

19...Rad8


Trades should generally favor Black because of
the passed pawn d4. Only f2-f4 to change the
pawn structure has to be accounted for. So,

19...g5 to secure f4, and then
20...Rac8
21...Ne7 to trade rooks

might be a good plan.

20. b4 Nb8?


20...Rf7 does better, though White's b2-b4-b5
and Bd3-c4-d5 really turns the advantage to White's
favor!

{ The calm 20...h6 21. b5 Na5 was called for here. White wins at least
a pawn because of back rank threats. }

21. Rc7 Rd7 22. Rfc1


It's probably +- here.

22...Rdd8

{ Incorrect would have been 22...Rfd8? 23. Rxd7 Nxd7 24. Rc7 as now
the rook is no longer on the c-file and Black has no compensation for
the pawn. }

23. Rxb7 Rdc8 24. Rxc8


24. Rcc7 is very good.

24...Rxc8 25. Rxa7?!


Yes, 25. Kf1 seems fine. It avoids
....Rc3 and pawn d4 advancing.

{ Greedy and unnecessary. }

25...Rc1+!?

{ Black has to come up with something to save the game and this is the
last shot effort. }

26. Bf1 h6 27. Re7 Nc6 28. Rc7 d3 29. g3?

{ Loses almost immediately. White suddenly realizes he has nothing to
stop the d-pawn from queening. The only try was 29. Rxc6 Rxc6 30. Bxd3
Rc3 and White should draw with his king side pawn mass. }

29...d2 30. Rd7 Nd4!

{ Devastating interception of the file and White has nothing left. }

31. Kg2 d1=Q 0-1

{ Trying to save the bishop leads to a forced mate: 32. Ba6 Qf3+ 33.
Kh3 Rg1 and there is no defense against Qh5#. }

  #4   Report Post  
Old August 6th 04, 09:36 AM
sathya_me
 
Posts: n/a
Default Positional analysis requested




Ton Lassila wrote:

This game doesn't really have tactical fireworks so I concentrated on
trying to evaluate the positional aspects. Please share your views and
correct any mistakes I've made in my evaluations. I had the black
pieces.


OWN and /OWN are the starting and end of my comments. First time

posting via usenet server.



[===========================copy and paste as
PGN==========================]


[Event "90'/40+30'"]
[Site "chennai"]
[Date "2004.07.08"]
[Round "?"]
[White "kin_2"]
[Black "azaris"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A15"]
[WhiteElo "1504"]
[BlackElo "1593"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[TimeControl "40/5400:0/0:1800"]

1. c4 Nf6 2. e3 {Interesting choice of opening, the reversed Sicilian.
Note
the immediate weakness of d3 resembling the d6 weakness of the Sicilian.
Likewise, play will be centered on the d-file from almost the very
beginning.}
e6 3. a3 {White wants to avoid the pin on c3. But now the square b3 is
weak as
well, which can't be good. Nc3, d4 or even b3 would have been more to
the
point here.} d5 {Staking a further hold on e4, White continues with the
reversed Sicilian theme and opens the c-file.} 4. cxd5 exd5 {4...Nxd5?!
5. e4
Nf6 6. Nf3! (Black can't capture on e4 due to 6...Nxe4?? 7. Qa4+ losing
a
piece) and White will soon play d4 to regain the upper hand.} 5. Nc3 Be7
6. d3
{6. d4!? would enable Bd3 but leaves e4 weak. Furthermore, White must
consider
the eventual break c5 from Black. The text move leaves White struggling
to
activate his pieces.} Be6 7. Nf3 c5 {Begins pressure on d4, where Black
will
soon strike. White is still struggling to untangle the mess his poor
handling
of the opening got him into and is in no condition to respond to this
central
strike. Instead he performs a diversion on the king side to win the two
bishops.} 8. Ng5 {Better was 8. d4!, where 8...c4 locks Black's central
pawns
in place and 8...cxd4 9. Nxd4 leaves White with two lovely central
knights.}
O-O 9. Nxe6 fxe6 {The dangerous light-squared bishop is gone, but now
Black
has a formidable looking pawn center. White still has nothing ready to
challenge this fact.} 10. Bd2 ({OWN:White did not play either d4 or e4
and
white cannot stay without that. Going through some english opening and
other
irrregular games the e4/d4 occurs at some stage. If any body finds a
game with
out this move at the middle of the game let me know.} 10. d4 cxd4 (10...
Nc6 {
Also a good move for black} 11. dxc5 Bxc5 12. b4 Bb6 {
At one stage black pushes the d4-d4 with support of b6 Bishop.}) 11.
exd4 {
This position looks similer to the closed friench trrash. I am talking
about
the pawn struct of black. Difference is that the light square bishop is
not in
the board so e6 is a back word pawn./OWN}) 10... Nc6 11. Be2 {White
has enter
ed a hedhehog-like position while Black has all but completed his
development.
The next move fires off the middlegame struggle.} d4 {The following
exchanges
are forced, as 12. Ne4 Nxe4 13. dxe4 d3 14. Bf1 c4 is hopeless for
White.} 12.
exd4 cxd4 13. Ne4 {13. Na2 looks ridiculously passive.} Nxe4 14. dxe4 {
The pay for Black's troubles is a passed pawn. To make it supported, he
must
play e5 but not immediately without preparations (14...e5? 15. Qb3+ Kh8
16.
Qxb7).} Kh8 {Removing the threat of queen check.} ({OWN} 14... Qb6 {
Mike Ogush idea} 15. Qb1 Rad8 16. f4 {
Does not white have a good center? Some body plz explain./OWN}) 15.
Bd3 ({
OWN} 15. Qb3 {Will also prevent the d3 move by making way for
rook/OWN})
15... e5 16. O-O Bg5 {As the pawns on d4 and e5 are locked for now, the
bishop
is on it's way of becoming a bad bishop and Black offers to trade.OWN
Not
only that. With the f4 white can break the pawn center/OWN} 17. Bxg5
Qxg5 18.
Qc1 {White offers the queen trade to gain control of the c-file. Black
accepts,
perhaps too eagerly because complications await for him.} Qxc1 19. Raxc1
{
White threatens b4, b5 and Rc7.} Rad8 20. b4 Nb8 {The calm 20...h6 21.
b5 Na5
was called for here. White wins at least a pawn because of back rank
threats.}
21. Rc7 Rd7 22. Rfc1 Rdd8 {Incorrect would have been 22...Rfd8? 23. Rxd7
Nxd7
24. Rc7 as now the rook is no longer on the c-file and Black has no
compensation for the pawn.} 23. Rxb7 Rc8 24. Rxc8 (24. Rcc7) 24... Rxc8
25.
Rxa7 {Greedy and unnecessary.} Rc1+ {Black has to come up with something
to
save the game and this is the last shot effort.} 26. Bf1 h6 27. Re7 Nc6
28. Rc7
d3 29. g3 {Loses almost immediately. White suddenly realizes he has
nothing to
stop the d-pawn from queening. The only try was 29. Rxc6 Rxc6 30. Bxd3
Rc3 and
White should draw with his king side pawn mass.} d2 30. Rd7 Nd4 {
Devastating interception of the file and White has nothing left.} 31.
Kg2 d1=Q
0-1



--
"Combination is the heart of chess"
A.Alekhine
Mail to:
sathyashrayan25 AT yahoo DOT com
(remove the AT and DOT)
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