Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 15th 04, 11:37 AM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan
  #2   Report Post  
Old March 15th 04, 02:14 PM
KidDon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan

________________________________
That is what many scholastic chess coaches instruct their kids for
scholastic tournaments, especially those with shorter time controls;
the reason being that every 1/2 pt. can help in the team standings,
and as long as the player has a queen on the board against another
scholastic opponent, he/she may be able to force perpetual check or
otherwise secure a draw. In my opinion, such an instruction should not
be given in a tournament that includes adult players, nor should it be
given in the higher levels of scholastics (i.e. players rated @ 1200 -
2200+).

Kiddon
  #4   Report Post  
Old March 17th 04, 03:09 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

On 15 Mar 2004 06:14:27 -0800, (KidDon) wrote:

(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan

________________________________
That is what many scholastic chess coaches instruct their kids for
scholastic tournaments, especially those with shorter time controls;
the reason being that every 1/2 pt. can help in the team standings,
and as long as the player has a queen on the board against another
scholastic opponent, he/she may be able to force perpetual check or
otherwise secure a draw. In my opinion, such an instruction should not
be given in a tournament that includes adult players, nor should it be
given in the higher levels of scholastics (i.e. players rated @ 1200 -
2200+).

Kiddon


Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master. In
this game, first I won the exchange. Then, on move 28, I won a knight,
leaving me a rook up. This is where I felt he should have resigned.
After that, on move 32, I won another rook. Now, it was ridiculous for
him to play on. Finally, on move 40 I won his queen. This left him in
a king and queen vs, king endgame. I guess he figured that I knew how
to mate with a queen and therefore he resigned.

[Event "Pulaski-Lynchburg Match"]
[Site "Lynchburg, Virginia"]
[Date "1986.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Shelton, Jeffrey"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 d4 5.d3 Be6 6.Ne2 c5 7.f4 Nc6 8.Nd2
Qh4+ 9.Kf1 exf4 10.Nf3 Qf6 11.Bxf4 h6 12.Qd2 O-O-O 13.Re1 c4
14.a3 Nge7 15.e5 Qg6 16.Nh4 Qh7 17.Be4 g6 18.Kg2 Bg7 19.Nf3 Bd5
20.Nfxd4 Nxd4 21.Nxd4 Bxe4+ 22.Rxe4 f5 23.exf6 Bxf6 24.Ne6 Nd5
25.Rxc4+ Kd7 26.Nxd8 Bxd8 27.Rd4 Qf7 28.c4 Kc8 29.cxd5 Bb6 30.Re4
g5 31.Qc3+ Kd7 32.Qxh8 gxf4 33.Rf1 Qxd5 34.Qe8+ Kc7 35.Rc1+ Bc5
36.Qe7+ Kb6 37.Rxc5 Qxc5 38.Rb4+ Kc6 39.Rc4 b6 40.Rxc5+ 1-0

Sam Sloan
  #5   Report Post  
Old March 17th 04, 03:27 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 15:09:58 GMT, (Sam Sloan)
wrote:

Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master.


In case anybody is wondering, Rusty Potter is listed as John Russell
Potter.

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/10199018

His current rating is 2216. He has been rated as high as 2355 and
never lower than 2200.

Sam Sloan


  #6   Report Post  
Old March 17th 04, 09:29 PM
Danny Purvis
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 15:09:58 GMT,
(Sam Sloan)
wrote:

Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master.


In case anybody is wondering, Rusty Potter is listed as John Russell
Potter.

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/10199018

His current rating is 2216. He has been rated as high as 2355 and
never lower than 2200.

Sam Sloan


Sometime around 1970 my friend Roger Ramsey, since passed away, and I
met Rusty Potter, I believe in Raleigh. I think we might have been on
a city bus when he approached us. After asking us if those weren't
chess sets we were carrying, he told us that he was trying to learn
how to play chess himself and that he was glad to meet some
experienced players. (Roger and I were teenagers, not very
experienced, both rated around 1600.) He then asked us all sorts of
beginner questions about chess and eventually started a game with
Roger in which he made only pawn moves. When we got to the
tournament, which was at a shopping mall, we soon learned that he was
a chess master. He had just been having a little fun with us.

He was athletic and charismatic. I lost to him in the third, Saturday
evening round. During that game he kept gazing up at the second tier
of the mall and commenting on women's legs and undergarments. At one
point Charles Powell, who eventually won the tournament, walked past
our board and, in response to Potter's boasts, taunted Potter by
observing that my position was not bad. I remember later that night
Potter shouting in a parking lot, "I'm the best ****ing chess player
in the world!"


Danny Purvis
  #7   Report Post  
Old March 18th 04, 10:17 AM
Bob Lablaw
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

Sam Sloan wrote:

On 15 Mar 2004 06:14:27 -0800, (KidDon) wrote:


(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...

Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan


________________________________
That is what many scholastic chess coaches instruct their kids for
scholastic tournaments, especially those with shorter time controls;
the reason being that every 1/2 pt. can help in the team standings,
and as long as the player has a queen on the board against another
scholastic opponent, he/she may be able to force perpetual check or
otherwise secure a draw. In my opinion, such an instruction should not
be given in a tournament that includes adult players, nor should it be
given in the higher levels of scholastics (i.e. players rated @ 1200 -
2200+).

Kiddon



Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master. In
this game, first I won the exchange. Then, on move 28, I won a knight,
leaving me a rook up. This is where I felt he should have resigned.
After that, on move 32, I won another rook. Now, it was ridiculous for
him to play on. Finally, on move 40 I won his queen. This left him in
a king and queen vs, king endgame. I guess he figured that I knew how
to mate with a queen and therefore he resigned.

[Event "Pulaski-Lynchburg Match"]
[Site "Lynchburg, Virginia"]
[Date "1986.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Shelton, Jeffrey"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 d4 5.d3 Be6 6.Ne2 c5 7.f4 Nc6 8.Nd2
Qh4+ 9.Kf1 exf4 10.Nf3 Qf6 11.Bxf4 h6 12.Qd2 O-O-O 13.Re1 c4
14.a3 Nge7 15.e5 Qg6 16.Nh4 Qh7 17.Be4 g6 18.Kg2 Bg7 19.Nf3 Bd5
20.Nfxd4 Nxd4 21.Nxd4 Bxe4+ 22.Rxe4 f5 23.exf6 Bxf6 24.Ne6 Nd5
25.Rxc4+ Kd7 26.Nxd8 Bxd8 27.Rd4 Qf7 28.c4 Kc8 29.cxd5 Bb6 30.Re4
g5 31.Qc3+ Kd7 32.Qxh8 gxf4 33.Rf1 Qxd5 34.Qe8+ Kc7 35.Rc1+ Bc5
36.Qe7+ Kb6 37.Rxc5 Qxc5 38.Rb4+ Kc6 39.Rc4 b6 40.Rxc5+ 1-0

Sam Sloan


I think 20 Nfxd4 would have lost you your chance to have the game
published anyway. It allows 20...Bxe4+ 21. dxe4 g4 and after ...Qxe4+
and ...Bxe5 Black has won two pawns at the very least, and possibly the
knight on d4 if you're not careful.

20. Nexd4 would have prevented this.
  #8   Report Post  
Old March 18th 04, 01:36 PM
Danny Purvis
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

(Danny Purvis) wrote in message . com...
(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...
On Wed, 17 Mar 2004 15:09:58 GMT,
(Sam Sloan)
wrote:

Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master.


In case anybody is wondering, Rusty Potter is listed as John Russell
Potter.

http://www.64.com/uscf/ratings/10199018

His current rating is 2216. He has been rated as high as 2355 and
never lower than 2200.

Sam Sloan


Sometime around 1970 my friend Roger Ramsey, since passed away, and I
met Rusty Potter, I believe in Raleigh. I think we might have been on
a city bus when he approached us. After asking us if those weren't
chess sets we were carrying, he told us that he was trying to learn
how to play chess himself and that he was glad to meet some
experienced players. (Roger and I were teenagers, not very
experienced, both rated around 1600.) He then asked us all sorts of
beginner questions about chess and eventually started a game with
Roger in which he made only pawn moves. When we got to the
tournament, which was at a shopping mall, we soon learned that he was
a chess master. He had just been having a little fun with us.

He was athletic and charismatic. I lost to him in the third, Saturday
evening round. During that game he kept gazing up at the second tier
of the mall and commenting on women's legs and undergarments. At one
point Charles Powell, who eventually won the tournament, walked past
our board and, in response to Potter's boasts, taunted Potter by
observing that my position was not bad. I remember later that night
Potter shouting in a parking lot, "I'm the best ****ing chess player
in the world!"


Danny Purvis



I now remember clearly that Rusty Potter's exuberant shout was
actually, "I'm the best chess player in the world!" How the notorious
f-word infected my initial recollection I will never know. My abject
apologies to one of the finest players I have ever met.

Danny Purvis
  #9   Report Post  
Old March 18th 04, 01:44 PM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

On Thu, 18 Mar 2004 12:17:44 +0200, Bob Lablaw
wrote:

Sam Sloan wrote:

On 15 Mar 2004 06:14:27 -0800, (KidDon) wrote:


(Sam Sloan) wrote in message ...

Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan

________________________________
That is what many scholastic chess coaches instruct their kids for
scholastic tournaments, especially those with shorter time controls;
the reason being that every 1/2 pt. can help in the team standings,
and as long as the player has a queen on the board against another
scholastic opponent, he/she may be able to force perpetual check or
otherwise secure a draw. In my opinion, such an instruction should not
be given in a tournament that includes adult players, nor should it be
given in the higher levels of scholastics (i.e. players rated @ 1200 -
2200+).

Kiddon



Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master. In
this game, first I won the exchange. Then, on move 28, I won a knight,
leaving me a rook up. This is where I felt he should have resigned.
After that, on move 32, I won another rook. Now, it was ridiculous for
him to play on. Finally, on move 40 I won his queen. This left him in
a king and queen vs, king endgame. I guess he figured that I knew how
to mate with a queen and therefore he resigned.

[Event "Pulaski-Lynchburg Match"]
[Site "Lynchburg, Virginia"]
[Date "1986.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Shelton, Jeffrey"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 d4 5.d3 Be6 6.Ne2 c5 7.f4 Nc6 8.Nd2
Qh4+ 9.Kf1 exf4 10.Nf3 Qf6 11.Bxf4 h6 12.Qd2 O-O-O 13.Re1 c4
14.a3 Nge7 15.e5 Qg6 16.Nh4 Qh7 17.Be4 g6 18.Kg2 Bg7 19.Nf3 Bd5
20.Nfxd4 Nxd4 21.Nxd4 Bxe4+ 22.Rxe4 f5 23.exf6 Bxf6 24.Ne6 Nd5
25.Rxc4+ Kd7 26.Nxd8 Bxd8 27.Rd4 Qf7 28.c4 Kc8 29.cxd5 Bb6 30.Re4
g5 31.Qc3+ Kd7 32.Qxh8 gxf4 33.Rf1 Qxd5 34.Qe8+ Kc7 35.Rc1+ Bc5
36.Qe7+ Kb6 37.Rxc5 Qxc5 38.Rb4+ Kc6 39.Rc4 b6 40.Rxc5+ 1-0

Sam Sloan


I think 20 Nfxd4 would have lost you your chance to have the game
published anyway. It allows 20...Bxe4+ 21. dxe4 g4 and after ...Qxe4+
and ...Bxe5 Black has won two pawns at the very least, and possibly the
knight on d4 if you're not careful.

20. Nexd4 would have prevented this.


Thank you very much. You are right of course. The line you give wins
for Black.

I am going to have to check my original scoresheets if I can ever
recover them to see if I really played 20. Nfxd4 because 20. Nexd4
accomplishes the same purposes and is superior in every way.

Just to explain, after 20. Nfxd4 Bxe4+ 21. dxe4 g5 22. Bg3 Qxe5+ Black
obviously has a win because he is about to win the knight on d4.
However, by simply capturing the pawn with a different knight with 20.
Nexd4 not with the knight no longer on e2 the Rook on e1 protects the
pawn on e4 and so White has won a pawn.

Sam Sloan
  #10   Report Post  
Old March 20th 04, 08:22 AM
newsnewsnews
 
Posts: n/a
Default Game Situation

Poor sportsmanship like that should be met with disciplinary measures by the
TD. It is in very bad taste, disrespectful, and bad for the game.



"Sam Sloan" wrote in message
...
On 15 Mar 2004 06:14:27 -0800, (KidDon) wrote:

(Sam Sloan) wrote in message

...
Some years ago I was playing in a non-rated team match. The opposing
team consisted of scholastic players. I was recruited to play first
board for the Lynchburg team because our team was short one player.

I played a nice combination and won a piece in the opening. I was
thinking about having the game published. However, my opponent refused
to resign. He just kept playing. Finally, I was two rooks up and still
he refused to resign. By now, the game was so long that no chess
magazine would ever publish it. I got mad and started to get angry
with my opponent. Finally, I won his queen too. Then, he resigned. By
then the game had dragged on for 40 moves and was far too long to be
published.

I complained to his coach (his team had a professional coach who was a
well known chess master) about the fact that his player had refused to
resign even though he was two rooks down. The coach explained that he
had told his team players not to resign unless they were at least a
queen down. This explained why he had not resigned when he was two
rooks down but did resign when I won his queen.

In this match, we had to play two games. I got so mad about this that
I played carelessly in the second game and lost.

Sam Sloan

________________________________
That is what many scholastic chess coaches instruct their kids for
scholastic tournaments, especially those with shorter time controls;
the reason being that every 1/2 pt. can help in the team standings,
and as long as the player has a queen on the board against another
scholastic opponent, he/she may be able to force perpetual check or
otherwise secure a draw. In my opinion, such an instruction should not
be given in a tournament that includes adult players, nor should it be
given in the higher levels of scholastics (i.e. players rated @ 1200 -
2200+).

Kiddon


Since several people have asked here is the game. My opponent was a
1900 player. His coach was Rusty Potter, a well known chess master. In
this game, first I won the exchange. Then, on move 28, I won a knight,
leaving me a rook up. This is where I felt he should have resigned.
After that, on move 32, I won another rook. Now, it was ridiculous for
him to play on. Finally, on move 40 I won his queen. This left him in
a king and queen vs, king endgame. I guess he figured that I knew how
to mate with a queen and therefore he resigned.

[Event "Pulaski-Lynchburg Match"]
[Site "Lynchburg, Virginia"]
[Date "1986.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Sloan, Sam"]
[Black "Shelton, Jeffrey"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A00"]

1.g4 d5 2.Bg2 c6 3.h3 e5 4.e4 d4 5.d3 Be6 6.Ne2 c5 7.f4 Nc6 8.Nd2
Qh4+ 9.Kf1 exf4 10.Nf3 Qf6 11.Bxf4 h6 12.Qd2 O-O-O 13.Re1 c4
14.a3 Nge7 15.e5 Qg6 16.Nh4 Qh7 17.Be4 g6 18.Kg2 Bg7 19.Nf3 Bd5
20.Nfxd4 Nxd4 21.Nxd4 Bxe4+ 22.Rxe4 f5 23.exf6 Bxf6 24.Ne6 Nd5
25.Rxc4+ Kd7 26.Nxd8 Bxd8 27.Rd4 Qf7 28.c4 Kc8 29.cxd5 Bb6 30.Re4
g5 31.Qc3+ Kd7 32.Qxh8 gxf4 33.Rf1 Qxd5 34.Qe8+ Kc7 35.Rc1+ Bc5
36.Qe7+ Kb6 37.Rxc5 Qxc5 38.Rb4+ Kc6 39.Rc4 b6 40.Rxc5+ 1-0

Sam Sloan



Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:11 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017