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Old January 2nd 04, 09:22 PM
Dr. David Kirkby
 
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Default scid vs chessbase

Would anyone who has used scid and chessbase comment how they compare?
I downloaded chessbase light and thought it was a pretty rotten
application, but many seem happy with the commercial version. I'm just
interested how scid compares with chessbase, and what (if any)
advantages chessbase has. The two main attractions for scid for me are
that

a) It's free
b) It runs under UNIX (A Windoze version is available too).

One of the problems I have is that I don't really know how best to use
these database programs, so don't know what features are useful and
what are not. I guess with time I will learn more about the advantages
of using them.

Dr. David Kirkby

email address can be found at:
http://atlc.sourceforge.net/contact.html
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Old January 3rd 04, 01:41 AM
CeeBee
 
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Default scid vs chessbase

(Dr. David Kirkby)
wrote in rec.games.chess.computer:

Would anyone who has used scid and chessbase comment how they compare?
I downloaded chessbase light and thought it was a pretty rotten
application, but many seem happy with the commercial version. I'm just
interested how scid compares with chessbase, and what (if any)
advantages chessbase has. The two main attractions for scid for me are
that

a) It's free
b) It runs under UNIX (A Windoze version is available too).

One of the problems I have is that I don't really know how best to use
these database programs, so don't know what features are useful and
what are not. I guess with time I will learn more about the advantages
of using them.



CB Light is an old application based on CB6. In the mean time, CB9 is
probably peeking around the corner.
CB Light and the current CB8 are hardly comparable.

SCID is a fine application, which works well and can teach you want you
want with a database for free. Many stick with it because it's all they
ever need.

The components in CB8 are more integrated than in SCID, and I found CB8
to be working more intuitive. Also there's a smooth design, and the
possibility to work with both the native CB format databases and PGN as
well.

Futhermore repertoire options and search masks in CB are more
sophisticated, and if you need that, CB will better cater you.

Don't forget there's also Chess Assistant on the market. There's a
freeware download of CA Light at
http://www.convekta.com/downloads.asp
Give it a try as well, maybe you're more inclined to Convekta's baby
than to ChessBase's kid.

Good luck.

--
CeeBee


"I am not a crook"

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Old January 3rd 04, 03:28 PM
pgeorges
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

JVarsoke a écrit :
I own CB7, CB8 and scid. I bought CB out of typical new hobbiest
enthusiasm; obviously spending $150 would improve my game
tremendiously! Of course, it didn't.

The 2 biggest advantages of CB8 are 1) it is more user friendly. 2)
it reads CB formatted files (like those sold for opening instruction).
And really, being "more" user friendly in no way means it is user
friendly. The interface is not very intuitive and things are
organized poorly. But still, slightly better than Scid.

As for its power, versitility and usefulness, I'd say unless you're
interested in doing something very specific that only CB8 does, you
probably won't want of anything by using Scid.

Since I encountered Scid, I've wished I had my $150 back.

I suggest you try Scid, if you find it lacking something that you're
willing to pay $150 for, then buy CB8. Of course, you might instead
just send Shane (scid author) an email and request the features -- and
perhaps send HIM the $150 .


I did the same, by buying Fritz 8 and Chessmaster 9000. The later has
great tutorials, but for game analysis I still prefer Scid + Crafty
(clearer, more efficient).
And moreover, I don't have to quit Linux to play chess :-)

So yes, it's more efficient to send money directly to Scid's author,
even if Scid is free ...

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Old January 4th 04, 02:51 AM
Jack
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

"Chris Scebelo" wrote in message . rr.com...
SCID is a truly great product and for free it's even greater.


I'd have to agree that SCID is a killer application. Very simple,
clear, and easy to use. I've tried chessbase lite but find it's
many cryptic buttons simply too confusing. The most important
function I use in SCID is the tree function, and I like the way
the tables are presented. Chessbase lite has a wierd way of presenting
the stats.
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Old January 4th 04, 03:00 AM
Douglas L Stewart
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

I've been running Linux for years and I'm an open source fan, but I ended up
buying Chessbase after trying SCID for a while.

For me it really came down to what I wanted to spend my time on - studying
chess or working on my computer. I chose chess. I just didn't want to
spend the time it took to find my own reference databases and search for new
games. I wanted to throw money at that problem and let someone else worry
about it.

That isn't to say that SCID is bad, because I was very impressed with it,
although I wish it was written in some other language. I just wanted to
focus my time on my chess study and have easy access to a real big game
database. If you're low on funds SCID will definitely keep you happy.

My computer chess tools a

* Bookup to track my opening repertoire (I bought Bookup first plus it seems
to be better suited for that task)
* Chessbase
* Fritz
* Mega database 2004 and Endgame Turbo II

"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
Would anyone who has used scid and chessbase comment how they compare?
I downloaded chessbase light and thought it was a pretty rotten
application, but many seem happy with the commercial version. I'm just
interested how scid compares with chessbase, and what (if any)
advantages chessbase has. The two main attractions for scid for me are
that

a) It's free
b) It runs under UNIX (A Windoze version is available too).

One of the problems I have is that I don't really know how best to use
these database programs, so don't know what features are useful and
what are not. I guess with time I will learn more about the advantages
of using them.

Dr. David Kirkby

email address can be found at:
http://atlc.sourceforge.net/contact.html



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Old January 4th 04, 04:56 AM
Euc1id
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

Since you're a unix guy, maybe you'll like Scid. Its author is a unix guy
too. But I'm a windows guy, and I don't like Scid. Too unintegrated from a
modern windows design standpoint. For me there's no question: CB8 wins by a
furlong. However I don't think many people really need CB8. Many of the same
features are built into the Fritz8/Shredder7 GUI, so I'd try them first. Buy
CB8 only if you need more database operations and versatility. Of course if
you're filthy rich, just buy CB8 straightaway and you've got the best.
--
Euc1id


"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
Would anyone who has used scid and chessbase comment how they compare?
I downloaded chessbase light and thought it was a pretty rotten
application, but many seem happy with the commercial version. I'm just
interested how scid compares with chessbase, and what (if any)
advantages chessbase has. The two main attractions for scid for me are
that

a) It's free
b) It runs under UNIX (A Windoze version is available too).

One of the problems I have is that I don't really know how best to use
these database programs, so don't know what features are useful and
what are not. I guess with time I will learn more about the advantages
of using them.

Dr. David Kirkby

email address can be found at:
http://atlc.sourceforge.net/contact.html


  #9   Report Post  
Old January 4th 04, 01:52 PM
Dr. David Kirkby
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

"Douglas L Stewart" wrote in message ...
"Dr. David Kirkby" m wrote
in message om...
Would anyone who has used scid and chessbase comment how they compare?
I downloaded chessbase light and thought it was a pretty rotten
application, but many seem happy with the commercial version. I'm just
interested how scid compares with chessbase, and what (if any)
advantages chessbase has. The two main attractions for scid for me are
that

a) It's free
b) It runs under UNIX (A Windoze version is available too).

One of the problems I have is that I don't really know how best to use
these database programs, so don't know what features are useful and
what are not. I guess with time I will learn more about the advantages
of using them.

Dr. David Kirkby

email address can be found at:
http://atlc.sourceforge.net/contact.html


I've been running Linux for years and I'm an open source fan, but I ended up
buying Chessbase after trying SCID for a while.


Interesting you say that.

For me it really came down to what I wanted to spend my time on - studying
chess or working on my computer. I chose chess. I just didn't want to
spend the time it took to find my own reference databases and search for new
games. I wanted to throw money at that problem and let someone else worry
about it.


I'm still sure I know the real reason for using these database
programs. I can store my own games, there's a nice interface to crafty
for analysis, but what do you mean by 'reference database' ? There
seems to be 1001 (well actually several million) games avaiable all
over the place in PGN format. Clearly the quality of the games varies
when you have several million, but there are plenty of ways of obtain
tens, perhaps 100,000's games in PGN format. So what exactly is a
'reference database'?

Does chessbase export PGN format games? If so (apart from any
copyright reasons) is there any reason you can't distribute the
'reference database', or is it only readable by chessbase?

That isn't to say that SCID is bad, because I was very impressed with it,
although I wish it was written in some other language. I just wanted to
focus my time on my chess study and have easy access to a real big game
database. If you're low on funds SCID will definitely keep you happy.


How do you use chessbase or scid best for 'chess study'? Sorry to
sound so ignorant of the matter, but I'm just keen to know the real
reason for using these programs. Sure I can search for GM games and
see how they opened, but I guess I must

My computer chess tools a

* Bookup to track my opening repertoire (I bought Bookup first plus it seems
to be better suited for that task)
* Chessbase
* Fritz
* Mega database 2004 and Endgame Turbo II


Quite a bit of $$'s I expect you spent on that lot.

Dr. David Kirkby.
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Old January 4th 04, 02:26 PM
Euc1id
 
Posts: n/a
Default scid vs chessbase

Q: I'm still sure I know the real reason for using these database
programs. I can store my own games, there's a nice interface to crafty
for analysis, but what do you mean by 'reference database' ? There
seems to be 1001 (well actually several million) games avaiable all
over the place in PGN format. Clearly the quality of the games varies
when you have several million, but there are plenty of ways of obtain
tens, perhaps 100,000's games in PGN format. So what exactly is a
'reference database'?

A: 'Reference database' is just a big database that the software uses for
it's internal workings. I haven't found it of any importance. You can
designate any of your databases as the 'reference database'. You must do so,
or Chessbase refuses to perform certain operations. I find it more of a
nuisance than of any value. Don't worry about it, because it's not
important!

Q: Does chessbase export PGN format games? If so (apart from any
copyright reasons) is there any reason you can't distribute the
'reference database', or is it only readable by chessbase?

A: Chessbase can import or export games in PGN format if you wish. However
it ordinarily stores them in its own format which uses a lot less space. PGN
format is a memory hog. I'm not sure what you mean by "distribute" a
database. You can export any games/databases with Chessbase. Again, there's
nothing special about the 'reference database', which only causes confusion
and has no value. Forget about it!

Q: How do you use chessbase or scid best for 'chess study'? Sorry to
sound so ignorant of the matter, but I'm just keen to know the real
reason for using these programs. Sure I can search for GM games and
see how they opened, but I guess I must

A: It depends on what you want to do. It's versatile. It will generally
accommodate your wishes/needs. For example I use it primarily to manage my
databases. I have several large databases from different sources. I make
various opening books from them, which I can access either with Chessbase or
Fritz, Shredder, etc. Typically I want to know the statistics for a
particular opening position, which is fast & easy after you've set up
opening books associated with each database. Occasionally I want to access a
particular game(s) corresponding to an opening position, which is of course
easy to do with any database. I note that the Fritz7-8/Shredder7 GUI works
just as well as Chessbase for most of these operations, so most people don't
really need Chessbase.
--
Euc1id


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