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Old March 10th 04, 09:28 PM
Gregory Topov
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

"CricketConnoisseur" wrote:

You were playing the monkey, right?


What is the monkey.


May I introduce you to Stanley the Chimp!
Stanley is the lowest rated personality in Chessmaster 8000. He has an ELO
of 1, and his moves are entirely random.

From Chessmaster:
"As a young chimp, Stanley wandered onto a game preserve in Africa where he
met a boy named Justin. The two became fast friends. Stanley has shown
Justin many chimpanzee pastimes like climbing trees and how to find the best
bananas. In return, Justin has taught Stanley some human things, like how
to program a VCR and how to play chess. Stanley absolutely refuses to play
chess unless he gets to wear Justin`s propeller hat.
Stanley knows how to move the pieces, but doesn`t really understand how to
play chess."

I don't know how he accomplished it, but Stanley did manage to checkmate my
five year old daughter once! Just goes to show that there is something
worse than random!
You heard it here first: Stanley Random Chess, soon to become even more
popular than Fischer Random Chess!

Out of curiosity, in your name is "Cricket" referring to the game (howzat!)
or the animal (chirp chirp!)?

--
Gregory Topov
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"I don't necessarily agree with everything I say." - Marshall McLuhan


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Old March 11th 04, 07:59 AM
flokske
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

Gregory Topov wrote:
*snip*
I don't know how he accomplished it, but Stanley did manage to checkmate my
five year old daughter once! Just goes to show that there is something
worse than random!


if it were my daughter, I'd be worried!

--
Flokske
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Old March 12th 04, 03:27 PM
CricketConnoisseur
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

"Gregory Topov" wrote in message ...
"CricketConnoisseur" wrote:

You were playing the monkey, right?


What is the monkey.


May I introduce you to Stanley the Chimp!
Stanley is the lowest rated personality in Chessmaster 8000. He has an ELO
of 1, and his moves are entirely random.


Why the personal attack. Something I did affect your ego. The ELO
rating of chessmaster himself was 2840 on my computer when I beat him.
Okay, the computer may not have been playing at full strength. I am
now practicing on a brand new computer set at the highest possible
setting and practicing only against Chessmaster. Defeating Chessmaster
on the latest computer is very very difficult and that trap is not
working. However, I am still trying and hope to at least try and draw
with him.

Even if my trap does not work on computers at full strength it is
still a very good trap to know. When a player tries why criticize him.
If I do succeed in at least drawing with Chessmaster on the latest
computer at full strength it will be quite an achievement. Better
players than me could then see my game (if and when I accomplish that)
and use it to actually try and beat Chessmaster himself.

So rather than appreciate what one has done you insult and critize. By
your surname I would presume you to be Russian and since you are on
this nsg you could very well be a very good chessplayer. Rather than
appreciating what others do you insult and critize. If and when I do
manage to beat (or at least draw) with Chessmaster himself at the
highest possible setting on the latest computer available I will post
my game. If its only a draw it will still be instructionally useful to
better players than me on how to beat Chessmaster himself on the
strongest possible computer set at the highest setting.

Regards,

Chessplayer

From Chessmaster:
"As a young chimp, Stanley wandered onto a game preserve in Africa where he
met a boy named Justin. The two became fast friends. Stanley has shown
Justin many chimpanzee pastimes like climbing trees and how to find the best
bananas. In return, Justin has taught Stanley some human things, like how
to program a VCR and how to play chess. Stanley absolutely refuses to play
chess unless he gets to wear Justin`s propeller hat.
Stanley knows how to move the pieces, but doesn`t really understand how to
play chess."

I don't know how he accomplished it, but Stanley did manage to checkmate my
five year old daughter once! Just goes to show that there is something
worse than random!
You heard it here first: Stanley Random Chess, soon to become even more
popular than Fischer Random Chess!

Out of curiosity, in your name is "Cricket" referring to the game (howzat!)
or the animal (chirp chirp!)?

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Old March 12th 04, 03:34 PM
CricketConnoisseur
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

flokske wrote in message ...
Gregory Topov wrote:
*snip*
I don't know how he accomplished it, but Stanley did manage to checkmate my
five year old daughter once! Just goes to show that there is something
worse than random!


Well that tells me about how good (or bad) you are as a teacher.

I taught my five year old daughter how to play chess. She picked it up
very quickly. In only 3 months of learning chess she was beating kids
who had been learning for over a year.

Also, she could beat Young Josh (rated about 1600) on CM 8000.

if it were my daughter, I'd be worried!


Yes you should be.

I may not be as good a chessplayer as Mr. Topov but I believe I can at
least teach and educate youngsters better than either of you. Proof of
my daughters performance in chess.

My goal was to try and tell people on this nsg that beating
Chessmaster himself was possible. The trap I used may not work on
certain computers and therefore I am now playing against Chessmaster
himself on a new computer at the highest setting possible. I am only
practicing against Chessmaster himself. My trap is not working but
then where's the fun if everything is easy.

If and when I at least draw with Chessmaster himself (as beating him
seems to be the job of only GM's or IM's) I will post that game.
Hopefully it will be instructional to those who are probably better
players than me in how to actually beat Chessmaster.

Regards,

Chessplayer
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Old March 12th 04, 08:15 PM
Gregory Topov
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

My apologies, I did not intend to insult you whatsoever. Somebody else (not
me) suggested that you were playing the monkey, and in answer to your
question about what the monkey is, I merely quoted what the Chessmaster
documentation says about the Stanley the chimp personality to answer your
question. I certainly didn't intend to denigrate your chess-playing
ability - in fact I believe I was one of those who complimented you for
finding this trap, and asserted that it would be effective against many
beginner players.

As far as my own chess-playing credentials are concerned, I would prefer not
to boast about my abilities, but I will admit to having a real fondness for
Stanley Random Chess (SRC), and I achieved my GM norms in SRC quite some
years ago already. So yes, I am a grandmaster in SR Chess. But rather than
speak about myself, allow me to simply share with you a thoughtful tribute
that I came across, devoted to one of the greatest SR Chess players in
history, SRC GM Lord Edward Humberton-Snapf (1874-1916). I personally have
two of Lord Humberton-Snapf's books, and am greatly indebted to him for my
own understanding of the intricacies of the game. Here is the tribute:

SRC GM Lord Humberton-Snapf, famous for his eponymous theorem, of which
there were 421 revisions, was one of the great Victorian players of the
game. He was a student of Percival "Watford Junction" Penfold, himself a
legend in the SR chess world, but young Edward soon exceeded his master with
his inate wit and guile, and a bit of cheating now and then. Lord
Humberton-Snapf rose to become the All England SRC Champion in 1897. During
the championship game of that year, in which one of the spectators was Queen
Victoria herself, Lord Humberton-Snapf performed a particularly daring
Gladstone Goodge Street Gambit, and followed this two moves later with the
now famous Camden Co-axial Combination, which led on to his spectacular win
64 moves later. Afterwards he was heard to remark that "My trousers are
shaking uncontrollably!", and the remark became his trade mark at all
subsequent important matches.

Lord Humberton-Snapf it was who helped brought the game to the great
unwashed masses of his time, through his famous books of SRC instructions-
"The Unwashed Masses Guide to Stanley Random Chess- Being the first Volume
of Instruction for The Great English Game of The Same Name, to Educate and
Exemplify for the Common Riff-Raffs in The Street the Rules of This Game"
and the book which later became compulsory reading for all would-be SRC
experts- "Vol Two".

Lord Humberton-Snapf died in the year 1916, after failing to correctly
execute a Vauxhall Ventral Verification move in an important SRC
championship game, and dying of a heart attack after his Finnish opponent
played an Silician reverse gambit. It was a most unfortunate ending to a
brilliant career, and the world has seen few SR Chess players of his
abilities since. As the British say, it's just not cricket.

Sincerely,
SRC GM Gregory Topov

--
Gregory Topov
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"I don't necessarily agree with everything I say." - Marshall McLuhan




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Old March 13th 04, 08:28 AM
CricketConnoisseur
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

"Gregory Topov" wrote in message ...
My apologies, I did not intend to insult you whatsoever. Somebody else (not
me) suggested that you were playing the monkey, and in answer to your
question about what the monkey is, I merely quoted what the Chessmaster
documentation says about the Stanley the chimp personality to answer your
question. I certainly didn't intend to denigrate your chess-playing
ability - in fact I believe I was one of those who complimented you for
finding this trap, and asserted that it would be effective against many
beginner players.


Yes, that is true. I too apologize if I said anything to offend you. I
guess we got off on the wrong foot here.


As far as my own chess-playing credentials are concerned, I would prefer not
to boast about my abilities, but I will admit to having a real fondness for
Stanley Random Chess (SRC), and I achieved my GM norms in SRC quite some
years ago already. So yes, I am a grandmaster in SR Chess. But rather than
speak about myself, allow me to simply share with you a thoughtful tribute
that I came across, devoted to one of the greatest SR Chess players in
history, SRC GM Lord Edward Humberton-Snapf (1874-1916). I personally have
two of Lord Humberton-Snapf's books, and am greatly indebted to him for my
own understanding of the intricacies of the game. Here is the tribute:



Your chess credentials are most impressive. I am not even in the same
league as you regarding my chess credentials. I am just a chess
enthusiast who loves to play the game. Also enjoy teaching youngsters.


SRC GM Lord Humberton-Snapf, famous for his eponymous theorem, of which
there were 421 revisions, was one of the great Victorian players of the
game. He was a student of Percival "Watford Junction" Penfold, himself a
legend in the SR chess world, but young Edward soon exceeded his master with
his inate wit and guile, and a bit of cheating now and then. Lord
Humberton-Snapf rose to become the All England SRC Champion in 1897. During
the championship game of that year, in which one of the spectators was Queen
Victoria herself, Lord Humberton-Snapf performed a particularly daring
Gladstone Goodge Street Gambit, and followed this two moves later with the
now famous Camden Co-axial Combination, which led on to his spectacular win
64 moves later. Afterwards he was heard to remark that "My trousers are
shaking uncontrollably!", and the remark became his trade mark at all
subsequent important matches.

Lord Humberton-Snapf it was who helped brought the game to the great
unwashed masses of his time, through his famous books of SRC instructions-
"The Unwashed Masses Guide to Stanley Random Chess- Being the first Volume
of Instruction for The Great English Game of The Same Name, to Educate and
Exemplify for the Common Riff-Raffs in The Street the Rules of This Game"
and the book which later became compulsory reading for all would-be SRC
experts- "Vol Two".

Lord Humberton-Snapf died in the year 1916, after failing to correctly
execute a Vauxhall Ventral Verification move in an important SRC
championship game, and dying of a heart attack after his Finnish opponent
played an Silician reverse gambit. It was a most unfortunate ending to a
brilliant career, and the world has seen few SR Chess players of his
abilities since. As the British say, it's just not cricket.



Once again I wish to apologize if I have said anything to offend you.
I have the highest regard for any good chessplayer.(And the utmost
respect for anyone who has achieved a Grandmaster status in the game).
I hope that we can correspond regularly. Please email me on my
personal email id above. I hope that your email id given above is
valid. I would sincerely like to correspond with you on that.

Sincerely,
SRC GM Gregory Topov


Yours sincerely,

Chessplayer
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Old March 13th 04, 05:36 PM
Matt Nemmers
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

"Gregory Topov" wrote in message
.. .
My apologies, I did not intend to insult you whatsoever. Somebody else

(not
me) suggested that you were playing the monkey, and in answer to your
question about what the monkey is, I merely quoted what the Chessmaster
documentation says about the Stanley the chimp personality to answer your
question. I certainly didn't intend to denigrate your chess-playing
ability - in fact I believe I was one of those who complimented you for
finding this trap, and asserted that it would be effective against many
beginner players.

As far as my own chess-playing credentials are concerned, I would prefer

not
to boast about my abilities, but I will admit to having a real fondness

for
Stanley Random Chess (SRC), and I achieved my GM norms in SRC quite some
years ago already. So yes, I am a grandmaster in SR Chess. But rather

than
speak about myself, allow me to simply share with you a thoughtful tribute
that I came across, devoted to one of the greatest SR Chess players in
history, SRC GM Lord Edward Humberton-Snapf (1874-1916). I personally have
two of Lord Humberton-Snapf's books, and am greatly indebted to him for my
own understanding of the intricacies of the game. Here is the tribute:

SRC GM Lord Humberton-Snapf, famous for his eponymous theorem, of which
there were 421 revisions, was one of the great Victorian players of the
game. He was a student of Percival "Watford Junction" Penfold, himself a
legend in the SR chess world, but young Edward soon exceeded his master

with
his inate wit and guile, and a bit of cheating now and then. Lord
Humberton-Snapf rose to become the All England SRC Champion in 1897.

During
the championship game of that year, in which one of the spectators was

Queen
Victoria herself, Lord Humberton-Snapf performed a particularly daring
Gladstone Goodge Street Gambit, and followed this two moves later with the
now famous Camden Co-axial Combination, which led on to his spectacular

win
64 moves later. Afterwards he was heard to remark that "My trousers are
shaking uncontrollably!", and the remark became his trade mark at all
subsequent important matches.

Lord Humberton-Snapf it was who helped brought the game to the great
unwashed masses of his time, through his famous books of SRC instructions-
"The Unwashed Masses Guide to Stanley Random Chess- Being the first Volume
of Instruction for The Great English Game of The Same Name, to Educate and
Exemplify for the Common Riff-Raffs in The Street the Rules of This Game"
and the book which later became compulsory reading for all would-be SRC
experts- "Vol Two".

Lord Humberton-Snapf died in the year 1916, after failing to correctly
execute a Vauxhall Ventral Verification move in an important SRC
championship game, and dying of a heart attack after his Finnish opponent
played an Silician reverse gambit. It was a most unfortunate ending to a
brilliant career, and the world has seen few SR Chess players of his
abilities since. As the British say, it's just not cricket.

Sincerely,
SRC GM Gregory Topov


ROFLMFAO!!!

You're just mean, Greg.

Regards,

Matt


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Old March 13th 04, 06:48 PM
Gregory Topov
 
Posts: n/a
Default CricketConnoisseur & Stanley the Chimp

"CricketConnoisseur" wrote in message
om...
Your chess credentials are most impressive. I am not even in the same
league as you regarding my chess credentials. I am just a chess
enthusiast who loves to play the game. Also enjoy teaching youngsters.


Well we SRC grandmasters enjoy the posts of chess enthusiasts as well, so
thank you for posting! I have reposted some of these messages under a new
thread entitled "SR Chess - introduced by GM Topov" - perhaps all future
conversation on this topic can be continued there. I look forward to your
further interaction and posts, CricketConnoisseur - top level players like
myself are very eager to promote a love and appreciation for this classic
game!

Sincerely,
SRC GM Topov
--
Gregory Topov
---------------------------------------------------------------------
"I don't necessarily agree with everything I say." - Marshall McLuhan


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