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Old June 29th 07, 02:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

WHITE TO PLAY AND WIN by Weaver W. Adams
plus SIMPLE CHESS by Weaver W. Adams

Revised and combined in 2007 with pictures and 34 games added and
introductions by Dr. Leroy W. Dubeck and Sam Sloan

When "White to Play and Win" was first published in 1939, it created a
great sensation because the author, Weaver W. Adams, claimed to be
able to prove that White has a win by force from the very first move,
against any defense.

Although the author was never able to prove his central thesis, he did
prove that these lines were lethal against the average tournament
player. Over the next ten years, playing exactly the opening lines in
this book, Adams won every City of Boston Championship, every
Massachusetts State Championship and every New England Championship,
usually winning every game without a loss or a draw.

Adams won the US Open Championship, played in five US Championships,
and was sent to Moscow as an alternate member of the US Team playing
against the USSR, always playing exactly the opening lines in this
book.

Bobby Fischer studied this book intently and used many of the
attacking lines in this book on his way to winning the World
Championship.

This book provides ways to attack against every major opening system,
the Sicilian Defense, the French Defense, the Caro-Kann Defense and so
on. There is also a "Black to Play and Win" Section on how to counter-
attack against the major openings by White.
This book and the follow-up work "Simple Chess" have been combined
together under one cover plus 34 chess games have been added showing
how Adams defeated such famous players as Kashdan, Steiner, Horowitz,
Evans, Santasiere, Pavey, Bernstein, Kramer, Shainswit and Seidman,
even though he told them in advance that he was going to play the
exact opening lines in these books.

ISBN 0-923891-83-8

Reprinted by Ishi Press International

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Old June 29th 07, 02:46 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"


To me Weaver W. Adams had the same attitude as Vince Lombardi. That
will give you an idea as to why he was successful. Even on the
Football field Lombardi had few plays in football. The other team
knew them but stopping them was a different matter.

EZoto
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Old July 20th 07, 01:29 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

"White to Play and Win" is now out and is available on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0923891838


On Jun 29, 9:00 am, samsloan wrote:
WHITE TO PLAY AND WIN byWeaverW.Adams
plus SIMPLE CHESS byWeaverW.Adams

Revised and combined in 2007 with pictures and 34 games added and
introductions by Dr. Leroy W. Dubeck and Sam Sloan

When "White to Play and Win" was first published in 1939, it created a
great sensation because the author,WeaverW.Adams, claimed to be
able to prove that White has a win by force from the very first move,
against any defense.

Although the author was never able to prove his central thesis, he did
prove that these lines were lethal against the average tournament
player. Over the next ten years, playing exactly the opening lines in
this book,Adamswon every City of Boston Championship, every
Massachusetts State Championship and every New England Championship,
usually winning every game without a loss or a draw.

Adamswon the US Open Championship, played in five US Championships,
and was sent to Moscow as an alternate member of the US Team playing
against the USSR, always playing exactly the opening lines in this
book.

Bobby Fischer studied this book intently and used many of the
attacking lines in this book on his way to winning the World
Championship.

This book provides ways to attack against every major opening system,
the Sicilian Defense, the French Defense, the Caro-Kann Defense and so
on. There is also a "Black to Play and Win" Section on how to counter-
attack against the major openings by White.
This book and the follow-up work "Simple Chess" have been combined
together under one cover plus 34 chess games have been added showing
howAdamsdefeated such famous players as Kashdan, Steiner, Horowitz,
Evans, Santasiere, Pavey, Bernstein, Kramer, Shainswit and Seidman,
even though he told them in advance that he was going to play the
exact opening lines in these books.

ISBN 0-923891-83-8

Reprinted by Ishi Press International



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Old July 20th 07, 11:56 AM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jun 29, 9:00 am, samsloan wrote:

WHITE TO PLAY AND WIN by Weaver W. Adams
plus SIMPLE CHESS by Weaver W. Adams

Revised and combined in 2007 with pictures and 34 games added and
introductions by Dr. Leroy W. Dubeck and Sam Sloan

When "White to Play and Win" was first published in 1939, it created a
great sensation because the author, Weaver W. Adams, claimed to be
able to prove that White has a win by force from the very first move,
against any defense.

Although the author was never able to prove his central thesis, he did
prove that these lines were lethal against the average tournament
player. Over the next ten years, playing exactly the opening lines in
this book, Adams won every City of Boston Championship, every
Massachusetts State Championship and every New England Championship,
usually winning every game without a loss or a draw.

Adams won the US Open Championship, played in five US Championships,
and was sent to Moscow as an alternate member of the US Team playing
against the USSR, always playing exactly the opening lines in this
book.

Bobby Fischer studied this book intently and used many of the
attacking lines in this book on his way to winning the World
Championship.

This book provides ways to attack against every major opening system,
the Sicilian Defense, the French Defense, the Caro-Kann Defense and so
on. There is also a "Black to Play and Win" Section on how to counter-
attack against the major openings by White.
This book and the follow-up work "Simple Chess" have been combined
together under one cover plus 34 chess games have been added showing
how Adams defeated such famous players as Kashdan, Steiner, Horowitz,
Evans, Santasiere, Pavey, Bernstein, Kramer, Shainswit and Seidman,
even though he told them in advance that he was going to play the
exact opening lines in these books.



This may well be a decent book, but this description
is a bit off the mark. Far from routinely beating all
comers despite them knowing in advance precisely
what lines he would play, Weaver Adams in fact lost
routinely to players like GM Reshevsky, GM Fine, H.
Lyman, and often to Santasiere. His system, then,
was far from infallible. This leaves me wondering just
how much of the hype is due to his preposterous
claim -- one which is reminiscent of Bobby Fischer's
famous "bust" to the King's Gambit.

I replayed W. Adams' game against Larry Evans,
and it seemed to me that he was one of those guys
who had a "difficult" repertoire -- not unlike the old
Novag Constellation, whose programmers were
accused of deliberately stacking the deck by
careful selection of tricky lines which humans are
known to play poorly (instead of grooming their
program to play chess very well).

So, what's the verdict on the actual lines he
recommended -- any good?


-- help bot




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Old July 20th 07, 01:22 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

I do not claim that Weaver W. Adams beat "all comers". He played in
five US Championships and finished with a minus score over-all.
However, against players below the master level, he wiped them out,
winning every game. In a ten year period from 1939 to 1949, he won
every City of Boston Championship, every Massachusetts State
Championship and every New England Championship, usually with a
perfect score without a single loss or draw.

More than that, he would actually show this book to his opponents
before the games and tell them that he was going to play the exact
moves in this book. Even conceding this huge advantage, he would win
every game.

In his sweep of the 1948 US Open, he beat Martin Starke, beat Anthony
Santasiere, drew Isaac Kashdan, beat Arial Mengarini, beat Max Pavey,
beat George Kramer and drew Olaf Ulvestad in the last round when that
guaranteed him first prize. All of those players were masters. This
was clearly a grandmaster result.

My book is not a mere reprint of Adams original book. The original
book is 167 pages. My reprint is 252 pages. I have added in the
introduction games and diagrams where Adams defeated Kashdan, Steiner,
Rossetto, Horowitz, Evans, Santasiere, Pavey, Bernstein, Kramer,
Shainswit, Seidman and a host of others.

Adams also had a winning position against Reshevsky in Hollywood 1945
but incredibly started a king side attack when he should have
concentrated on queening a pawn.

The only top players he was never able to defeat were Reshevsky and
Fine. He had a winning position against Reshevsky in Hollywood, 1945
but could not convert. Fine admitted in his article in the May 1944
issue of Chess Review that the reason he was able to defeat Adams was
that he had studied the book, "White to Play" and Win, and had found a
weakness in the analysis.

Later, Bobby Fischer, who had studied "White to Play and Win", adopted
many of Adams' opening ideas and used them on the way to winning the
World Championship.

Sam Sloan



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Old July 20th 07, 04:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jul 20, 8:22 am, samsloan wrote:

I do not claim that Weaver W. Adams beat "all comers".



Yeah, I noticed that your list of players he beat did
not include any of the foreign grandmasters.

But you did claim he "won every City of Boston
Championship, every Massachusetts State
Championship and every New England Championship,
usually winning every game without a loss or a draw".

And you listed none of his *many* losses, even when
giving a list of famous players he beat. And your
wording seemed to be straining to not admit that he
lost any games; your choice of "was never able to
defeat" for instance, in place of "lost to repeatedly". :D


He played in
five US Championships and finished with a minus score over-all.
However, against players below the master level, he wiped them out,
winning every game. In a ten year period from 1939 to 1949, he won
every City of Boston Championship, every Massachusetts State
Championship and every New England Championship, usually with a
perfect score without a single loss or draw.



Okay, but then, what sort of opposition did he face?

I pulled up all his games which are recorded at
chessgames.com, and he had many losses and
wins, and many were against no-name players I
didn't recognize. Even the one game I decided to
look over had Larry Evans playing very poorly (for
example, his Nxe5 was obviously a dud), although
in this game WA also played very well.


More than that, he would actually show this book to his opponents
before the games and tell them that he was going to play the exact
moves in this book. Even conceding this huge advantage, he would win
every game.



I'm not sure it is such a "huge advantage"; as I said
before, he seemed to be playing lines where humans
have a lot of trouble playing well; Larry Evans even
fell apart once taken out of book early, in effect,
putting up no resistance.


In his sweep of the 1948 US Open, he beat Martin Starke, beat Anthony
Santasiere


And about time! LOL


drew Isaac Kashdan, beat Arial Mengarini, beat Max Pavey,
beat George Kramer and drew Olaf Ulvestad in the last round when that
guaranteed him first prize. All of those players were masters. This
was clearly a grandmaster result.



Perhaps, but it was just one result. Look over his
games against A. Santasiere, and you will see that he
normally *lost*; what sort of "grandmaster" would do
that?


My book is not a mere reprint of Adams original book. The original
book is 167 pages. My reprint is 252 pages. I have added in the
introduction games and diagrams where Adams defeated Kashdan, Steiner,
Rossetto, Horowitz, Evans, Santasiere, Pavey, Bernstein, Kramer,
Shainswit, Seidman and a host of others.



Yes, and you threw in another book as well, as
mentioned in the subtitle.


Adams also had a winning position against Reshevsky



Uh-oh, here we go. Gaining a winning position
*but then failing to win it* is supposed to be
evidence of greatness? IMO, certain players
like SR and LE simply played the opening poorly
at times, getting bad positions. If you look at the
tournament where GM Reshevsky played all the
top Russians, he had plenty of losing positions, but
fought his way back! This merely demonstrates
that those players had serious weaknesses, too.


in Hollywood 1945
but incredibly started a king side attack when he should have
concentrated on queening a pawn.



Again, this is supposed to show greatness?


The only top players he was never able to defeat were Reshevsky and
Fine. He had a winning position against Reshevsky in Hollywood, 1945
but could not convert. Fine admitted in his article in the May 1944
issue of Chess Review that the reason he was able to defeat Adams was
that he had studied the book, "White to Play" and Win, and had found a
weakness in the analysis.



Yes, but plenty of other players, far weaker than
GM Fine, have beaten Mr. Adams. His games are
listed at chessgames.com, so this is easy to check.


Later, Bobby Fischer, who had studied "White to Play and Win", adopted
many of Adams' opening ideas and used them on the way to winning the
World Championship.



I think this is probably why the book sounds so
familiar.

Obviously, Weaver Adams knocked off a long list
of names, including some grandmasters; but taken
as a whole, his record at chessgames.com does
not impress all that much. Look at how GMs Fine
and Reshevsky, among others, repeatedly beat
him. And even A. Santasiere bested him by a wide
margin (I don't know, but I don't think he was a GM).

Your claim that he won virtually every game and
tournament in a certain region reminds me of IM
Innes' stuff; there is no way to verify if this is true or
not, so I prefer to look at the (very real) record at
chessgames.com. Anybody can toss out unverifiable
claims like those; my guess is that somewhere out
there, sits one fellow who in fact beat WA in one of
those many tournaments, but he is too old and
feeble now to type. :D


-- help bot




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Old July 20th 07, 06:23 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jul 20, 11:44 am, help bot wrote:

Yes, but plenty of other players, far weaker than
GM Fine, have beaten Mr. Adams. His games are
listed at chessgames.com, so this is easy to check.

Later, Bobby Fischer, who had studied "White to Play and Win", adopted
many of Adams' opening ideas and used them on the way to winning the
World Championship.


I think this is probably why the book sounds so
familiar.

Obviously, Weaver Adams knocked off a long list
of names, including some grandmasters; but taken
as a whole, his record at chessgames.com does
not impress all that much. Look at how GMs Fine
and Reshevsky, among others, repeatedly beat
him. And even A. Santasiere bested him by a wide
margin (I don't know, but I don't think he was a GM).

Your claim that he won virtually every game and
tournament in a certain region reminds me of IM
Innes' stuff; there is no way to verify if this is true or
not, so I prefer to look at the (very real) record at
chessgames.com. Anybody can toss out unverifiable
claims like those; my guess is that somewhere out
there, sits one fellow who in fact beat WA in one of
those many tournaments, but he is too old and
feeble now to type. :D

-- help bot


Thank you. I really do appreciate your comments but you miss the main
point.

The main point is that Weaver W. Adams beat everybody below master
just about 100% of the time and often beat grandmasters as well
playing exactly the openings in his book "White to Play and Win", yet
he was not a grandmaster himself.

In other words, he beat players better than himself by playing the
openings in this book.

This means that this is a good book.

The great thing about this book is that Adams gives a line to play
against the Sicilian Defense, a line to play against the Caro-Kann
Defense, a line to play against the Alekhine's Defense and so on.
Thus, you do not have to go out and buy MCO, ECO, BCO and the rest of
the alphabet plus an openings monograph by Schiller on every
variation. You have it all in just one medium sized book, plus he even
tells you how to win with black in case white dares to not play the
openings he recommends.

Sam Sloan

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Old July 20th 07, 07:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jul 20, 12:23 pm, samsloan wrote:


In other words, he beat players better than himself by playing the
openings in this book.

This means that this is a good book.


Ah, yes, the logic of a brilliant mind. Wilt Chamberlain is a man, WC
is 7 feet tall, therefore, all men are seven feet tall.


The great thing about this book is that Adams gives a line to play
against the Sicilian Defense, a line to play against the Caro-Kann
Defense, a line to play against the Alekhine's Defense and so on.
Thus, you do not have to go out and buy MCO, ECO, BCO and the rest of
the alphabet plus an openings monograph by Schiller on every
variation. You have it all in just one medium sized book, plus he even
tells you how to win with black in case white dares to not play the
openings he recommends.


And this analysis is only what, sixty years out of date?

This does not detract from the fact that the book may be of
considerable interest... but to recommend it as a repertoire book
seems rather ridiculous (as is the recommendation to buy an opening
monograph by Schiller, but that's another story). Sam, if you can't
represent things for what they are, what hope do we have of you ever
performing effectively on the board... wait a minute....

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Old July 20th 07, 08:28 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jul 20, 1:23 pm, samsloan wrote:

Thank you. I really do appreciate your comments but you miss the main
point.

The main point is that Weaver W. Adams beat everybody below master
just about 100% of the time and often beat grandmasters as well
playing exactly the openings in his book "White to Play and Win", yet
he was not a grandmaster himself.

In other words, he beat players better than himself by playing the
openings in this book.



Rrright. So you are suggesting that these openings
were so good that THEY beat almost everybody, despite
WA being less than a great player.

Once again, this reminds me of IM Innes' stuff. Let me
just take the one game I recently replayed as a handy
example: Larry Evans, having White, played a bad move
or two and Weaver Adams exploited this to the max.
There was nothing unusual here, except that, as I have
said, the line was one of those types of openings which
many humans don't play well (and LE was no exception).

The reason I don't accept your claim that WA beat
virtually everyone below master level is this: the games
at chessgames.com tell a very different story from the
one you tell; look at the names -- unknown players won
or lost almost at random, while the best of the bunch
defeated WA consistently. This seems to suggest that
his openings, however effective against weak players,
were not good enough to even come close to your hype.
Now, maybe I'm wrong; maybe everything you say is
correct, and it is mere coincidence that when I looked
at the actual games, there were quite a number of
unexpected-per-your-hype losses. Maybe... .



This means that this is a good book.



Okay, but I still don't believe all the hype about WA
beating everybody in sight (but somehow his many
losses escaped your memory).


The great thing about this book is that Adams gives a line to play
against the Sicilian Defense, a line to play against the Caro-Kann
Defense, a line to play against the Alekhine's Defense and so on.



Most books that old are of far less use now than they
were back then; this is because many assessments
change markedly over time, right along with the relative
popularity of various openings. Believe it or not, old time
grandmasters would sometimes spend years testing out
lousy variations, before finally settling for something a
bit better. (You realize this when, after a game at say,
30/30 time control where you came out with a tough
position, you go home and look up your game only to
find that you had "improved" on a titled idiot's choice in
some FIDE tournament at 3 minutes per move!)


Thus, you do not have to go out and buy MCO, ECO, BCO and the rest of
the alphabet plus an openings monograph by Schiller on every
variation. You have it all in just one medium sized book, plus he even
tells you how to win with black in case white dares to not play the
openings he recommends.



There are a lot of such books around these days. Some
even purport to show you how to win as Black -- as if...!

One thing which pops into mind is the fact that BF had
a lot of trouble in 1962 against the Russians due to his
openings repertoire; as White, GM Fischer allowed easy
equality; I'm wondering if this was the WA repertoire, or
if he had already switched by then. My guess is that this
book may be interesting for historical purposes, and even
for an opening repertoire which is so outmoded that few
will know how to handle the recommended lines, just as
Larry Evans didn't.


-- help bot


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Old July 20th 07, 08:33 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.chess
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Default New Reprinted Book: "White to Play and Win"

On Jul 20, 2:00 pm, SBD wrote:


The great thing about this book is that Adams gives a line to play
against the Sicilian Defense, a line to play against the Caro-Kann
Defense, a line to play against the Alekhine's Defense and so on.
Thus, you do not have to go out and buy MCO, ECO, BCO and the rest of
the alphabet plus an openings monograph by Schiller on every
variation. You have it all in just one medium sized book, plus he even
tells you how to win with black in case white dares to not play the
openings he recommends.


And this analysis is only what, sixty years out of date?

This does not detract from the fact that the book may be of
considerable interest... but to recommend it as a repertoire book
seems rather ridiculous (as is the recommendation to buy an opening
monograph by Schiller, but that's another story). Sam, if you can't
represent things for what they are, what hope do we have of you ever
performing effectively on the board... wait a minute....



Somewhere out there... there must be a real book
review which gives a more objective assessment of
this classic. I've never seen it, but the name Weaver
Adams rings familiar. (I mean the original book, not
SS's new and improved version, with added materials.)


-- help bot



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