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Old March 30th 04, 03:47 PM
Karp
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Someone knows what voltage (I assume it is 6 volts...?...) and
polarity has the transformer for Sensory Chess Challenger 9?

I use it with batteries and I have lost the transformer. The manual
just advice to use its own unit, it doesn't give any specifications. I
don't want to risk experimenting... I could fry the venerable machine
if I go wrong with polarity =:-O
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Old March 30th 04, 07:28 PM
Dick Schneiders
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Here is everything that is written on the transformer that came with my SC9.

120 v.
60 hz
8 w
PNP 695
9 VDC
350 MA

PWR Supply 581B

Hopefully some of that means something to you.

Dick Schneiders

Someone knows what voltage (I assume it is 6 volts...?...) and
polarity has the transformer for Sensory Chess Challenger 9?

I use it with batteries and I have lost the transformer. The manual
just advice to use its own unit, it doesn't give any specifications. I
don't want to risk experimenting... I could fry the venerable machine
if I go wrong with polarity =:-O








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Old March 30th 04, 07:33 PM
Dick Schneiders
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Also, you can buy a replacement for $25 US at:

http://www.classicchessandgames.com/ChessPieces.htm

Dick Schneiders
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Old March 31st 04, 03:42 AM
Karp
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Thanks a lot, Dick!

I visited your link, and it seems almost every Fidelity Chess Computer
had the same transformer. I think I'm going to email them to ask it.

I am a bit puzzled by the 9v in the SC9's transformer. SC9 has 4
batteries and it gives 4x1.5v = 6v, but I don't know nothing about
electricity and maybe this comparison with batteries is not relevant.

The main thing I ignore is "polarity": where are the positive and the
negative poles? Maybe it is included in the specifications that you
wrote, but I'm not able to recognize it.

I think I have a SC12's transformer... so I could test it with my SC9,
as it seems all them share the same transformer.

Again, thanks for your data and link.
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Old March 31st 04, 08:25 AM
Alain Z
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Hello,

I think I have a SC12's transformer... so I could test it with my SC9,
as it seems all them share the same transformer.


It should work, I use my CC7 adapter for CC10, SC8, SC9, SC12 as well as Par
Excellence (but sorry, I don't know the polarity).

By the way, do you have the SC12 manual ?

Thanks
Alain




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Old March 31st 04, 06:37 PM
Benjamin Jordan
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

The picture would look something like this:

Negative tip: (+) ----(o ---- (-)

Positive tip: (+) ----o) ---- (-)

"Guy Macon" http://www.guymacon.com wrote in message
...

Karp says...

I am a bit puzzled by the 9v in the SC9's transformer. SC9 has 4
batteries and it gives 4x1.5v = 6v, but I don't know nothing about
electricity and maybe this comparison with batteries is not relevant.


Batteries tend to keep at a steady voltage as you load them, while
low cost transformer power supplies tend to have lower voltage as
you load them. The "9V" power supply may be dipping down to 6V
under worst-case load. How long do your batteries last, and what
kind are they? I can estimate the load from that.

Another possibility is that the 9V power supply was cheaper than
a 6V supply would be, and the unit runs fine on either voltage.
Are any lights on it brighter with the power supply? Is the sound
louder?

Another possibility is that the 9V power supply was cheaper than
a 6V supply would be, and the unit drops the voltage internally.
An old trick we engineers use is to put two LEDs (inside the case
where you can't see them) in series with the supply to drop it a
few volts.

The main thing I ignore is "polarity": where are the positive and the
negative poles? Maybe it is included in the specifications that you
wrote, but I'm not able to recognize it.


Often there is a picture somewhere on the label. If not, maybe
someone here who owns one has a voltmeter or knows someone who
has one.


--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
have an "impossible" engineering project that only someone like
Doc Brown can solve? My resume is at http://www.guymacon.com/



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Old April 2nd 04, 03:41 AM
Entropyfoe
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Karp,

Yes, polarity is very important.

.. You can always tell if you are clever and have some hands on engineering
skills.

You have the specs that another poster gave you. You could have got the
voltage by counting the batteries in series and multiplying by approxamatly 1.5
volts per battery.

As for polarity, take the case apart so yoy can see the wiring to the batteries
and the adapter jack. See which lead goes to the negative on the battery pack,
and trace this onto the circuit board and to the power adaptor jack. You can
trace which is the center conductor of the jack to which terminal of the
battery is plus [or minus].

An Ohmeter can also let you identify which is connected to what.

If you are not familiar with these things, consult your local engineer.
-J

I could fry the venerable machine
if I go wrong with polarity =:-O



entr0pyf0e
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Old April 2nd 04, 04:50 AM
Benjamin Jordan
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

If it's negative tip, it might have a little diagram on the adapter
somewhere that looks something like this:

(+)----(o----(-)

"Entropyfoe" wrote in message
...
Karp,

Yes, polarity is very important.

. You can always tell if you are clever and have some hands on

engineering
skills.

You have the specs that another poster gave you. You could have got the
voltage by counting the batteries in series and multiplying by

approxamatly 1.5
volts per battery.

As for polarity, take the case apart so yoy can see the wiring to the

batteries
and the adapter jack. See which lead goes to the negative on the battery

pack,
and trace this onto the circuit board and to the power adaptor jack. You

can
trace which is the center conductor of the jack to which terminal of the
battery is plus [or minus].

An Ohmeter can also let you identify which is connected to what.

If you are not familiar with these things, consult your local engineer.
-J

I could fry the venerable machine
if I go wrong with polarity =:-O



entr0pyf0e



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Old April 2nd 04, 07:03 AM
Guy Macon
 
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Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity


Entropyfoe says...

As for polarity, take the case apart so yoy can see the wiring to the batteries
and the adapter jack. See which lead goes to the negative on the battery pack,
and trace this onto the circuit board and to the power adaptor jack. You can
trace which is the center conductor of the jack to which terminal of the
battery is plus [or minus].


This assumes that the power supply connects to the battery.
That's a bad design; it tends to turn cheap batteries into
leakers. I would be very surprised if there wasn't at least
a diode between the two.

An Ohmeter can also let you identify which is connected to what.


If you have an Ohmmeter you also have a voltmeter, so you can just
measure the voltage and polarity at the connecter.

--
Guy Macon, Electronics Engineer & Project Manager for hire.
Remember Doc Brown from the _Back to the Future_ movies? Do you
have an "impossible" engineering project that only someone like
Doc Brown can solve? My resume is at http://www.guymacon.com/

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Old April 3rd 04, 05:22 AM
Entropyfoe
 
Posts: n/a
Default Tranformer for Fidelity SC9: voltage and polarity

Guy is correct, often there would be a blocking diode in the circuit, but the
point is, with some basic circuit knowledge, taking the case apart will allow
you to answer the polarity question.

I am sure Guy in a few minutes could take the unit apart and determine the
polarity of the connector, judging from on line resume.

-Jay
entr0pyf0e
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