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Old February 16th 08, 04:53 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Blockade!

I have been watching Nakamura take on Rybka lately at blitz on ICC. He
can draw an unexpected number of times given that Rybka is rated at
about 3700 in blitz and he is only about 3400. Sometimes he even wins
by running the computer out of time.

I learned a few tricks from him. I used them to win from a lesser
computer engine that was rated 2698 in blitz. It took me 260 moves.
The computer's contempt factor wouldn't allow it to accept my draw
offers, so I won on time. Heh, the computers don't like a blockade
strategy.

Of course I lost a number of games trying to figure this out. It was
still fun though.
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.
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Old February 16th 08, 06:12 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Blockade!

J.D. Walker wrote:
I have been watching Nakamura take on Rybka lately at blitz on ICC. He
can draw an unexpected number of times given that Rybka is rated at
about 3700 in blitz and he is only about 3400. Sometimes he even wins
by running the computer out of time.

I learned a few tricks from him. I used them to win from a lesser
computer engine that was rated 2698 in blitz. It took me 260 moves. The
computer's contempt factor wouldn't allow it to accept my draw offers,
so I won on time. Heh, the computers don't like a blockade strategy.

Of course I lost a number of games trying to figure this out. It was
still fun though.


I started out the following game with the blockade strategy, but it
turned into a King's Indian theme anyways.... Surprise! I crushed the
computer.

[Event "ICC"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2008.02.15"]
[White "QueenMaxima"]
[Black "Me"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2609"]
[BlackElo "1877"]
[TimeControl "300+1"]

1. e4 b6 2. d4 e6 3. Be3 a6 4. Nf3 d6 5. Nbd2 h6
6. Bc4 Ne7 7. O-O Nd7 8. a4 g6 9. d5 e5 10. a5 b5
11. Be2 Bg7 12. c4 bxc4 13. Nxc4 O-O 14. Nfd2 f5 15. f3 f4
16. Bf2 g5 17. Rc1 Nf6 18. b3 Ng6 19. Nb2 Rf7 20. Bd3 Bf8
21. Qe2 h5 22. Rc3 Rg7 23. Rfc1 g4 24. Rc6 h4 25. Qf1 g3
26. Be1 h3 27. hxg3 fxg3 28. Bxg3 Nh5 29. Bf2 hxg2 30. Qe1 Ngf4
31. Qe3 Qg5 32. Rxc7 Nh3+ 33. Kh2 Nxf2 34. Rxg7+ Qxg7 35. Qxf2 Nf4
36. Qg3 Bh3 37. Qe1 Be7 38. Rc7 Qh7 39. Kg1 Bg4 40. Rc8+ Rxc8
41. Qg3 Qh1+ 42. Kf2 Bh4 43. Nf1 g1=Q+ 44. Ke1 Bxg3+ 45. Kd1 Bxf3+
46. Be2 Bxe2+ 47. Kd2 Qd4+ 48. Nd3 Qxd3#
0-1
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.
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Old February 16th 08, 06:39 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 5,365
Default Blockade!

On Feb 16, 11:12*am, "J.D. Walker" wrote:
J.D. Walker wrote:
I have been watching Nakamura take on Rybka lately at blitz on ICC. *He
can draw an unexpected number of times given that Rybka is rated at
about 3700 in blitz and he is only about 3400. *Sometimes he even wins
by running the computer out of time.


I learned a few tricks from him. *I used them to win from a lesser
computer engine that was rated 2698 in blitz. *It took me 260 moves. The
computer's contempt factor wouldn't allow it to accept my draw offers,
so I won on time. *Heh, the computers don't like a blockade strategy. *


Of course I lost a number of games trying to figure this out. *It was
still fun though.


I started out the following game with the blockade strategy, but it
turned into a King's Indian theme anyways.... *Surprise! *I crushed the
computer. *

[Event "ICC"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2008.02.15"]
[White "QueenMaxima"]
[Black "Me"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2609"]
[BlackElo "1877"]
[TimeControl "300+1"]

1. e4 b6 2. d4 e6 3. Be3 a6 4. Nf3 d6 5. Nbd2 h6
6. Bc4 Ne7 7. O-O Nd7 8. a4 g6 9. d5 e5 10. a5 b5
11. Be2 Bg7 12. c4 bxc4 13. Nxc4 O-O 14. Nfd2 f5 15. f3 f4
16. Bf2 g5 17. Rc1 Nf6 18. b3 Ng6 19. Nb2 Rf7 20. Bd3 Bf8
21. Qe2 h5 22. Rc3 Rg7 23. Rfc1 g4 24. Rc6 h4 25. Qf1 g3
26. Be1 h3 27. hxg3 fxg3 28. Bxg3 Nh5 29. Bf2 hxg2 30. Qe1 Ngf4
31. Qe3 Qg5 32. Rxc7 Nh3+ 33. Kh2 Nxf2 34. Rxg7+ Qxg7 35. Qxf2 Nf4
36. Qg3 Bh3 37. Qe1 Be7 38. Rc7 Qh7 39. Kg1 Bg4 40. Rc8+ Rxc8
41. Qg3 Qh1+ 42. Kf2 Bh4 43. Nf1 g1=Q+ 44. Ke1 Bxg3+ 45. Kd1 Bxf3+
46. Be2 Bxe2+ 47. Kd2 Qd4+ 48. Nd3 Qxd3#
0-1
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


What do you mean by Blokade strategy?

Tell me so that I use it in my GetClub Chess then it will outplay
those players who use computer to play against GetClub Chess.

Play Chess at: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html


How can you win with this strategy is it something about Pawn
Structures?


Bye
Sanny

Play Chess at: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html
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Old February 16th 08, 06:55 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,058
Default Blockade!

Sanny wrote:
On Feb 16, 11:12 am, "J.D. Walker" wrote:
J.D. Walker wrote:
I have been watching Nakamura take on Rybka lately at blitz on ICC. He
can draw an unexpected number of times given that Rybka is rated at
about 3700 in blitz and he is only about 3400. Sometimes he even wins
by running the computer out of time.
I learned a few tricks from him. I used them to win from a lesser
computer engine that was rated 2698 in blitz. It took me 260 moves. The
computer's contempt factor wouldn't allow it to accept my draw offers,
so I won on time. Heh, the computers don't like a blockade strategy.
Of course I lost a number of games trying to figure this out. It was
still fun though.

I started out the following game with the blockade strategy, but it
turned into a King's Indian theme anyways.... Surprise! I crushed the
computer.

[Event "ICC"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2008.02.15"]
[White "QueenMaxima"]
[Black "Me"]
[Result "0-1"]
[WhiteElo "2609"]
[BlackElo "1877"]
[TimeControl "300+1"]

1. e4 b6 2. d4 e6 3. Be3 a6 4. Nf3 d6 5. Nbd2 h6
6. Bc4 Ne7 7. O-O Nd7 8. a4 g6 9. d5 e5 10. a5 b5
11. Be2 Bg7 12. c4 bxc4 13. Nxc4 O-O 14. Nfd2 f5 15. f3 f4
16. Bf2 g5 17. Rc1 Nf6 18. b3 Ng6 19. Nb2 Rf7 20. Bd3 Bf8
21. Qe2 h5 22. Rc3 Rg7 23. Rfc1 g4 24. Rc6 h4 25. Qf1 g3
26. Be1 h3 27. hxg3 fxg3 28. Bxg3 Nh5 29. Bf2 hxg2 30. Qe1 Ngf4
31. Qe3 Qg5 32. Rxc7 Nh3+ 33. Kh2 Nxf2 34. Rxg7+ Qxg7 35. Qxf2 Nf4
36. Qg3 Bh3 37. Qe1 Be7 38. Rc7 Qh7 39. Kg1 Bg4 40. Rc8+ Rxc8
41. Qg3 Qh1+ 42. Kf2 Bh4 43. Nf1 g1=Q+ 44. Ke1 Bxg3+ 45. Kd1 Bxf3+
46. Be2 Bxe2+ 47. Kd2 Qd4+ 48. Nd3 Qxd3#
0-1
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


What do you mean by Blokade strategy?

Tell me so that I use it in my GetClub Chess then it will outplay
those players who use computer to play against GetClub Chess.

Play Chess at: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html


How can you win with this strategy is it something about Pawn
Structures?


Bye
Sanny

Play Chess at: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html


I don't think it will help your program Sanny. As I understand it, one
tries to delay contact between the pawn masses. When they do make
contact try to lock the position in a favorable way. A side effect of
this is that it maximizes the amount of calculating that the computer
has to do, because often almost all the pieces stay on the board a long
time. Yet the fixed nature of the strategy minimizes calculation for
the human player.

If you play at ICC, try looking for matches between "Smallville" or
"Goldmun" against "TransWarp." The latter is Rybka. The two human GMs
are very good at the blockade strategy. Rybka still wins most of the
games, because it is difficult to arrive at a locked position. If Rybka
breaksthrough, the humans usually resign immediately, because a 3700+
rated Rybka can crush them tactically pretty easily at blitz speeds.

I saw one game where Nakamura, AKA "Smallville," sacced his queen for a
minor piece to maintain the blockade and managed to draw anyways.
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.
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Old February 16th 08, 09:49 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 9,302
Default Blockade!

On Feb 16, 1:39 am, Sanny wrote:


What do you mean by Blokade strategy?

Tell me so that I use it in my GetClub Chess then it will outplay
those players who use computer to play against GetClub Chess.



For a demonstration of how Aron Nimzowitch's
"blockade" strategy works, simply play over the
first half of this game:

http://www.getclub.com/playgame.php?...672&game=Chess

As you can see, I completely embarrassed
the stupid computer, forcing it to first blockade,
and then later win, my c-pawn. This was all
part of my master plan of course; I knew that
if I could just somehow hang something, this
would force me to defend and yes, allow the
computer to then fail in its attack! I had first
considered "overprotecting" my h7 pawn,
but decided against it since that has already
been done before. So this is why I decided
on the strategy of allowing my c-pawns to get
blocked, attacked, and then gobbled up. It
worked like a charm... .


-- help bot




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Old February 16th 08, 12:09 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,058
Default Blockade!

help bot wrote:
On Feb 16, 1:39 am, Sanny wrote:


What do you mean by Blokade strategy?

Tell me so that I use it in my GetClub Chess then it will outplay
those players who use computer to play against GetClub Chess.



For a demonstration of how Aron Nimzowitch's
"blockade" strategy works, simply play over the
first half of this game:

http://www.getclub.com/playgame.php?...672&game=Chess

As you can see, I completely embarrassed
the stupid computer, forcing it to first blockade,
and then later win, my c-pawn. This was all
part of my master plan of course; I knew that
if I could just somehow hang something, this
would force me to defend and yes, allow the
computer to then fail in its attack! I had first
considered "overprotecting" my h7 pawn,
but decided against it since that has already
been done before. So this is why I decided
on the strategy of allowing my c-pawns to get
blocked, attacked, and then gobbled up. It
worked like a charm... .


-- help bot


"My System" may well help Sanny, but that variety of blockade is
different from what I was describing. What GMs like Nakamura are doing
with Rybka is trying to blockade the entire position, not just an
isolated pawn.
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.
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Old February 16th 08, 12:26 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,058
Default Blockade!

J.D. Walker wrote:
help bot wrote:
On Feb 16, 1:39 am, Sanny wrote:


What do you mean by Blokade strategy?

Tell me so that I use it in my GetClub Chess then it will outplay
those players who use computer to play against GetClub Chess.



For a demonstration of how Aron Nimzowitch's
"blockade" strategy works, simply play over the
first half of this game:

http://www.getclub.com/playgame.php?...672&game=Chess

As you can see, I completely embarrassed
the stupid computer, forcing it to first blockade,
and then later win, my c-pawn. This was all
part of my master plan of course; I knew that
if I could just somehow hang something, this
would force me to defend and yes, allow the
computer to then fail in its attack! I had first
considered "overprotecting" my h7 pawn,
but decided against it since that has already
been done before. So this is why I decided
on the strategy of allowing my c-pawns to get
blocked, attacked, and then gobbled up. It
worked like a charm... .


-- help bot


"My System" may well help Sanny, but that variety of blockade is
different from what I was describing. What GMs like Nakamura are doing
with Rybka is trying to blockade the entire position, not just an
isolated pawn.


Perhaps we need a different term than blockade for this situation...

Maybe an example will help to clarify. Games of this sort can last up
to 300+ moves. The 50 move rule often comes into play. Here is a
mercifully short game (84 moves) where Nakamura succeeds in blockading
the entire position while also trapping his opponents queen inside the
blockade!

[Event "ICC"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2008.02.16"]
[White "Smallville"]
[Black "TransWarp"]
[Result ""]
[TimeControl "180+0"]

1. e3 e5 2. Ne2 Nf6 3. b3 Nc6 4. Bb2 d5 5. d3 Bb4+
6. Nd2 O-O 7. a3 Bc5 8. h3 d4 9. e4 g6 10. g3 Be6
11. Bg2 a5 12. a4 Qd7 13. Kf1 Ne8 14. Kg1 Nd6 15. Kh2 f6
16. Nc4 Kg7 17. Rf1 Nxc4 18. dxc4 h5 19. Nc1 h4 20. g4 Nb4
21. Ba3 Qd6 22. Bxb4 Bxb4 23. Nd3 Bc3 24. Rb1 c6 25. Kh1 Rad8
26. Qe2 g5 27. Rfd1 b6 28. f3 Rd7 29. Bf1 Re7 30. Qg2 Kg6
31. Nc1 Qa3 32. Bd3 Rd8 33. Ne2 Bb2 34. Qg1 c5 35. Qf1 Bd7
36. Qg1 Bc6 37. Qf1 Rb7 38. Qg2 Kg7 39. Qg1 Qa2 40. Qg2 Ra7
41. Qg1 Re7 42. Qg2 Re6 43. Qg1 Kg6 44. Qg2 Qa3 45. Qg1 Red6
46. Qg2 Rf8 47. Qg1 Qa2 48. Qg2 Rfd8 49. Qg1 R8d7 50. Qg2 Kg7
51. Qg1 Qa3 52. Qg2 Rd8 53. Qg1 Qa2 54. Qg2 Bd7 55. Qg1 Qa3
56. Qg2 Be6 57. Qg1 Bc8 58. Qg2 Bb7 59. Qg1 Bc6 60. Qg2 R6d7
61. Qg1 Rf8 62. Qg2 Qa2 63. Qg1 Rfd8 64. Qg2 Re8 65. Qg1 Kh6
66. Qg2 Qa3 67. Qg1 Red8 68. Qg2 Re7 69. Qg1 Rg7 70. Qg2 Qa2
71. Qg1 Kg6 72. Qg2 Rf8 73. Qg1 Qa3 74. Qg2 Re7 75. Qg1 Kg7
76. Qg2 Bd7 77. Qg1 Rd8 78. Qg2 Be6 79. Qg1 Bc8 80. Qg2 Bb7
81. Qg1 Rc7 82. Qe1 Rcd7 83. Qf1 Bc3 84. Ng1 Bc6

Curious stuff....
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.
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Old February 16th 08, 12:58 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 3,390
Default Blockade!

On Sat, 16 Feb 2008 04:09:13 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
wrote:


"My System" may well help Sanny, but that variety of blockade is
different from what I was describing. What GMs like Nakamura are doing
with Rybka is trying to blockade the entire position, not just an
isolated pawn.


There are some cute White-to-move-and-draw problems where Black ends
up a couple Rooks and a Bishop ahead, but can't win because all the
Pawns get locked.
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Old February 17th 08, 03:54 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 9,302
Default Blockade!

On Feb 16, 7:26 am, "J.D. Walker" wrote:

Perhaps we need a different term than blockade for this situation...

Maybe an example will help to clarify. Games of this sort can last up
to 300+ moves. The 50 move rule often comes into play. Here is a
mercifully short game (84 moves) where Nakamura succeeds in blockading
the entire position while also trapping his opponents queen inside the
blockade!

[Event "ICC"]
[Site "Internet Chess Club"]
[Date "2008.02.16"]
[White "Smallville"]
[Black "TransWarp"]
[Result ""]
[TimeControl "180+0"]



The strategy here should be let the computer
run you out of time-- then whine that the contest
was unfair, due to its innate superiority in terms
of mouse speed. The system is rigged... it was
a conspiracy... etc.


1. e3 e5 2. Ne2 Nf6 3. b3 Nc6 4. Bb2 d5 5. d3 Bb4+
6. Nd2 O-O 7. a3 Bc5 8. h3 d4 9. e4 g6 10. g3 Be6
11. Bg2 a5 12. a4 Qd7 13. Kf1 Ne8 14. Kg1 Nd6 15. Kh2 f6
16. Nc4 Kg7 17. Rf1 Nxc4 18. dxc4 h5 19. Nc1 h4 20. g4 Nb4
21. Ba3 Qd6 22. Bxb4 Bxb4 23. Nd3 Bc3 24. Rb1 c6 25. Kh1 Rad8
26. Qe2 g5 27. Rfd1 b6 28. f3 Rd7 29. Bf1 Re7 30. Qg2 Kg6
31. Nc1 Qa3 32. Bd3 Rd8 33. Ne2 Bb2 34. Qg1 c5 35. Qf1 Bd7
36. Qg1 Bc6 37. Qf1 Rb7 38. Qg2 Kg7 39. Qg1 Qa2 40. Qg2 Ra7
41. Qg1 Re7 42. Qg2 Re6 43. Qg1 Kg6 44. Qg2 Qa3 45. Qg1 Red6
46. Qg2 Rf8 47. Qg1 Qa2 48. Qg2 Rfd8 49. Qg1 R8d7 50. Qg2 Kg7
51. Qg1 Qa3 52. Qg2 Rd8 53. Qg1 Qa2 54. Qg2 Bd7 55. Qg1 Qa3
56. Qg2 Be6 57. Qg1 Bc8 58. Qg2 Bb7 59. Qg1 Bc6 60. Qg2 R6d7
61. Qg1 Rf8 62. Qg2 Qa2 63. Qg1 Rfd8 64. Qg2 Re8 65. Qg1 Kh6
66. Qg2 Qa3 67. Qg1 Red8 68. Qg2 Re7 69. Qg1 Rg7 70. Qg2 Qa2
71. Qg1 Kg6 72. Qg2 Rf8 73. Qg1 Qa3 74. Qg2 Re7 75. Qg1 Kg7
76. Qg2 Bd7 77. Qg1 Rd8 78. Qg2 Be6 79. Qg1 Bc8 80. Qg2 Bb7
81. Qg1 Rc7 82. Qe1 Rcd7 83. Qf1 Bc3 84. Ng1 Bc6

Curious stuff....



It seems strange to even try to compete
against a computer at this time control; is
it not the case that the human loses time
relative to the computer program, on every
move? Is it not possible, perhaps even
likely, for the human player to make a
decisive mouse error at this time control?

Maybe if you got Jason Repa -- the world's
foremost authority on rgc cussing and bullet
chess -- to enter the moves for the human,
it wouldn't be so bad.

Now, why does the fifty move draw rule
matter? In my experience, a program can
simply sac' a piece unsoundly every 49
moves and go on to win anyway. Who is
the human player here-- an android GM?
Why is he not "man" enough to face
Rybka OTB, at "normal" time controls
and get squashed, like everybody else?
Pawn odds, even?


-- help bot



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