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Old September 15th 08, 07:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default FRITZ is God

Is it just me, or does anyone else get a spine-tingling chill every
time Fritz, in "Infinite Analysis" mode, finds a wicked move out of
nowhere you didn't even consider? Also, does Fritz not contradict
Tarrasch (who said in every position, there is only one best move)
because its evaluation function gives equal decimal scores to a host
of moves? After a game, I don't just turn the game on "analysis", but
I go through it a move at a time using "Infinite Analysis" and when I
get to a move I thought long and hard about, it is most revealing what
Fritz chooses! My chess has greatly improved, because I see how
sensitive and intelligent Fritz plays--it doesn't always retake a
piece right away, it allows its king to be checked and harried as long
as it finds an eventual safe square, it is happy at times to "lose"
its queen for 3 pieces--it truly has taught me more about chess than
chess books.

The problem with chess books is that they are usually written by
masters, and so they focus on only certain moves that interest them.
But what if I want to know about a move with no commentary?
This is why I like game collections with NO annotations, because this
way I can stop and focus on a strange pawn move and figure it out,
instead of "rushing" to the master's commentary. Fritz is great for
this reason too, because of its huge game database (most unannotated),
one can simply go through a game at one's pace, and try out different
variations and see why they are not as strong as the masters.

I have Fritz 7 and the only disadvantage it has is that it does not
give "human" or "heuristic" advice.
It would be nice to know WHY it evaluates a position a certain way.
Anyone have a table of Fritz heuristics and evaluation function?
Fritz is GOD!
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Old September 15th 08, 08:53 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default FRITZ is God

* atheist_wino (20:44) schrieb:
^^^^^^^
Fritz is GOD!


Fritz doesn't exist?

mfg, simon .... l
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Old September 15th 08, 11:29 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default FRITZ is God


"Simon Krahnke" wrote in message
...
* atheist_wino (20:44) schrieb:
^^^^^^^
Fritz is GOD!


Fritz doesn't exist?

mfg, simon .... l


Fritz is everywhere, any time, among us and died for my sins
....but Rybka is even better


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Old September 16th 08, 01:52 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default FRITZ is God

atheist_wino wrote:
Also, does Fritz not contradict Tarrasch (who said in every
position, there is only one best move) because its evaluation
function gives equal decimal scores to a host of moves?


Stick white queens on b7 and h7 and the black king on e8. Put the
white king out of the way, somewhere. White to play. Which is best,
Qa8#, Qb8#, Qc8#, Qg8#, Qh8#, Qbe7# or Qhe7# ?

Do you think Tarrasch hadn't noticed that there are positions like
this?

The problem with chess books is that they are usually written by
masters, and so they focus on only certain moves that interest them.
But what if I want to know about a move with no commentary? This is
why I like game collections with NO annotations, because this way I
can stop and focus on a strange pawn move and figure it out, instead
of "rushing" to the master's commentary.


So, er, take your time and don't rush? The master commentary will
still be there, even if you spend a quarter hour thinking about other
moves. And it will explain to you exactly the things that Fritz
won't. And then you can use the knowledge you gain from the
commentary and Fritz's tactical assistance to try to work out why the
other moves were played.

I have Fritz 7 and the only disadvantage it has is that it does not
give "human" or "heuristic" advice.
It would be nice to know WHY it evaluates a position a certain way.
Anyone have a table of Fritz heuristics and evaluation function?


When Fritz says `This position scores +0.78', what it means is, `In
seven or eight moves' time, I can get to a position where my
evaluation function says +0.78 and, unless I've missed something, you
can't stop me!' Fritz's strength comes as much from its ability to
search fruitful parts of the tree as it does from the evaluation
function. I'd be surprised if any strong player were to recommend
that somebody base their chess thinking on evaluation functions.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Unholy Game (TM): it's like a family
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ board game but it's also a crime
against nature!
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Old September 18th 08, 07:15 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Posts: 5,365
Default Have a Match between Fritz God and GetClub God.

Have a Match with GetClub Chess.

Easy Level vs Fritz at 5 sec / move and see who plays better.

Match at GetClub: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html

Lets see how the game is played and how Fritz wins the game by its
strong evaluations.

Bye
Sanny

Play Chess at: http://www.GetClub.com/Chess.html
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