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Old October 16th 08, 08:06 AM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Chess evolves...

The fact that more and more people are thinking about making changes
in the chess rules is a sign that people are experiencing the game as
less exciting today, compared with the seventies.

To introduce a cannon into Western chess, which can optionally be
excluded by the players, could be an answer to today's routinization
of chess, occasioned by theoretical development and computer power.

The Culverin cannon can step one square in any direction like a king,
provided that the square is empty. It can capture long-distance by
leaping over any piece in any direction. Enemy pawns, however, can
restrict its movement.

The culverin was a long cannon (as an 18-pounder) of the 16th and 17th
centuries (Webster's Dictionary).
http://hem.passagen.se/melki9/culverinchess.htm

/Mats
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Old October 16th 08, 12:31 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Chess evolves...

M Winther wrote:
The fact that more and more people are thinking about making changes
in the chess rules


[Citation needed]

is a sign that people


[Who?]

are experiencing the game as less exciting today, compared with the
seventies.



Dave.

--
David Richerby Carnivorous Ghost (TM): it's like a
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ haunting spirit but it eats flesh!
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Old October 16th 08, 01:34 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Chess evolves...

Den 2008-10-16 13:31:31 skrev David Richerby :

M Winther wrote:
The fact that more and more people are thinking about making changes
in the chess rules


[Citation needed]

is a sign that people


[Who?]

are experiencing the game as less exciting today, compared with the
seventies.



Dave.


Most chessplayers don't even know that there is an ongoing WCH
match right now. Compare with the sixties, seventies, and the
Karpov-Kasparov matches in the early eighties.

Just shut up and have a look at my Culverin Chess where standard
chess is retained as an option. Don't be so lazy and unsuspecting.
Things are happening in chess now, and it's time to take control
over the development. Certain grandmasters want to wholly move
over to rapid chess, to make the game less tedious. Don't let
them take charge over the situation. Now it's time to be creative and
not so damned conservative. Culverin Chess:
http://hem.passagen.se/melki9/culverinchess.htm

Mats

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Old October 16th 08, 03:02 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess evolves...

M Winther wrote:
David Richerby :
M Winther wrote:
The fact that more and more people are thinking about making
changes in the chess rules


[Citation needed]

is a sign that people


[Who?]

are experiencing the game as less exciting today, compared with
the seventies.


Most chessplayers don't even know that there is an ongoing WCH
match right now. Compare with the sixties, seventies, and the
Karpov-Kasparov matches in the early eighties.


That does not indicate that `more and more people are thinking about
making changes in the chess rules.' It does not indicate that the
decrease in interest in chess that you claim is because of stagnation
in the rules of chess -- there could be any number of reasons.

Just shut up


Oh, puhlease.

Follow-ups set -- this has nothing to do with computer chess.

Dave.

--
David Richerby Accelerated Dictator (TM): it's like
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ a totalitarian leader but it's twice
as fast!
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Old October 16th 08, 05:45 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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Default Chess evolves...

Den 2008-10-16 16:02:07 skrev David Richerby :

M Winther wrote:
David Richerby :
M Winther wrote:
The fact that more and more people are thinking about making
changes in the chess rules

[Citation needed]

is a sign that people

[Who?]

are experiencing the game as less exciting today, compared with
the seventies.


Most chessplayers don't even know that there is an ongoing WCH
match right now. Compare with the sixties, seventies, and the
Karpov-Kasparov matches in the early eighties.


That does not indicate that `more and more people are thinking about
making changes in the chess rules.' It does not indicate that the
decrease in interest in chess that you claim is because of stagnation
in the rules of chess -- there could be any number of reasons.


It indicates that if chess is going to compete against the allurement of
everything else that captivates young people today, then one cannot
demand that they sit before the computer for days on end to learn
theory in order to be able to be competitive. It must be more creative
and less tedious, because we live in an era when people want to
see results faster. The collective psychology is undergoing change,
and one must adapt to that.

Mats


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Old October 16th 08, 06:29 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2006
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Default Chess evolves...

* M Winther (18:45) schrieb:

It indicates that if chess is going to compete against the allurement of
everything else that captivates young people today, then one cannot
demand that they sit before the computer for days on end to learn
theory in order to be able to be competitive. It must be more creative
and less tedious, because we live in an era when people want to
see results faster. The collective psychology is undergoing change,
and one must adapt to that.


Oh please shut up.

mfg, simon .... l
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Old October 16th 08, 11:28 PM posted to rec.games.chess.computer
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 5
Default Chess evolves...

M Winther wrote:
The fact that more and more people are thinking about making changes
in the chess rules is a sign that people are experiencing the game as
less exciting today, compared with the seventies.

To introduce a cannon into Western chess, which can optionally be
excluded by the players, could be an answer to today's routinization
of chess, occasioned by theoretical development and computer power.

The Culverin cannon can step one square in any direction like a king,
provided that the square is empty. It can capture long-distance by
leaping over any piece in any direction. Enemy pawns, however, can
restrict its movement.

The culverin was a long cannon (as an 18-pounder) of the 16th and 17th
centuries (Webster's Dictionary).
http://hem.passagen.se/melki9/culverinchess.htm

/Mats

If grandmasters are still challenged by playing chess so nothing needs
to be changed however if you want to experience the most extremely
radical evolutionary change in chess just google protopowers and get
yourself a free copy of that game.
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