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Old March 6th 07, 02:26 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

I want to teach my son to keep score using long algebraic notation,
for example

1. e2-e4 Ng8-f6 2. Nb1-c3 d7-d5

I know that short algebraic notation is accepted as a method of
keeping score in USCF tournaments. What about long algebraic?

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Old March 6th 07, 03:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On 6 Mar 2007 06:26:17 -0800, "Beliavsky" wrote:

I want to teach my son to keep score using long algebraic notation,
for example

1. e2-e4 Ng8-f6 2. Nb1-c3 d7-d5

I know that short algebraic notation is accepted as a method of
keeping score in USCF tournaments. What about long algebraic?


I'm pretty sure that long algebraic is accepted too.
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Old March 6th 07, 03:49 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

Beliavsky wrote:
I want to teach my son to keep score using long algebraic notation,


Why? Why not teach him to use the notation that's used in all the
books?


Dave.

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Old March 6th 07, 04:26 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On 06 Mar 2007 15:49:34 +0000 (GMT), David Richerby
wrote:

Why? Why not teach him to use the notation that's used in all the
books?


Not quite all. Chernov's "Capablanca's Best chess endings" uses long
algebraic. :-)
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Old March 6th 07, 04:53 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On Mar 6, 9:49 am, David Richerby
wrote:
Beliavsky wrote:
I want to teach my son to keep score using long algebraic notation,


Why? Why not teach him to use the notation that's used in all the
books?


I think that some of the Russians - again I am relying on memory -
like Botvinnik (?) preferred long algebraic; at least one of the
arguments was for accuracy and perhaps even better visualization of
"the board in your head" - and of course, if you know long algebraic,
short shouldn't be hard to read....

But that's just an "I think" based on something I read years ago, so I
make no claims as to its accuracy.

And unless something has changed, I think all forms of algebraic are
acceptable - at least in the old days, when I played, I always used
German algebraic as I learned to play chess there and when there were
scoresheet disputes, my notation was seen as acceptable. I would think
that it would discourage foreign players from playing in USCF events
if short English descriptive were mandated... but that's a TD/rules
question.



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Old March 6th 07, 05:44 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

SBD wrote:
David Richerby wrote:
Beliavsky wrote:
I want to teach my son to keep score using long algebraic notation,


Why? Why not teach him to use the notation that's used in all the
books?


I think that some of the Russians - again I am relying on memory -
like Botvinnik (?) preferred long algebraic; at least one of the
arguments was for accuracy and perhaps even better visualization of
"the board in your head" - and of course, if you know long
algebraic, short shouldn't be hard to read....


Dvoretsky's columns at chesscafe.com use long algebraic for the main
line and short algebraic for the notes, which would tend to support
your recollection.


Dave.

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Old March 6th 07, 06:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On 6 Mar 2007 08:53:00 -0800, "SBD" wrote:

that it would discourage foreign players from playing in USCF events
if short English descriptive were mandated... but that's a TD/rules
question.


The USCF rulebook (chapter 3) says that FIDE recognizes only algebraic
(but it doesn't say anything about long alg.). USCF supports the use
of a single worldwide system but recognizes other systems such as
descriptive and computer notation. It does on to describe the
standard algebraic, FAN, long algebraic, abbreviated algebraic,
computer notation, English DN, Spanish descriptive, and international
correspondence. I assume that any of those are acceptable to the
USCF. In particular, I can't see any problem whatsoever with using
long algebraic.
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Old March 6th 07, 06:20 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On Tue, 06 Mar 2007 13:16:18 -0500, Jud McCranie
wrote:

The USCF rulebook (chapter 3) says that FIDE recognizes only algebraic


Also, earlier in the book, rule 15A says that algebraic is standard
but that descriptive or computer notation is permitted.
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Old March 6th 07, 06:45 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On Mar 6, 12:16 pm, Jud McCranie
wrote:
On 6 Mar 2007 08:53:00 -0800, "SBD" wrote:

that it would discourage foreign players from playing in USCF events
if short English descriptive were mandated... but that's a TD/rules
question.


The USCF rulebook (chapter 3) says that FIDE recognizes only algebraic
(but it doesn't say anything about long alg.). USCF supports the use
of a single worldwide system but recognizes other systems such as
descriptive and computer notation.


I wonder if that single worldwide system is the German one, which is
what we call it in the problem world. For example, I edit at a problem
magazine called Orbit that uses English as the language of choice but
German notation - K,D,L,S,B.



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Old March 6th 07, 11:38 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default long algebraic notation

On 6 Mar 2007 10:45:40 -0800, "SBD" wrote:

I wonder if that single worldwide system is the German one, which is
what we call it in the problem world.


I think it just means "algebraic", and doesn't get into any of the
variations or languages.
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