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Old March 26th 07, 07:43 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Ivory Dye Questions

Most 19th century ivory chess set have red for the dark pieces.
1. What was the dye used?
2. Why was red the primary color choice?

Thanks in advance.


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Old March 27th 07, 02:50 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Ivory Dye Questions

On Mar 26, 1:43 pm, "B. Lafferty" wrote:

Most 19th century ivory chess set have red for the dark pieces.
1. What was the dye used?
2. Why was red the primary color choice?


I haven't been able to find anything on the nature of the dye, but
there is an explanation for the choice of red on page 40 of "Master
Pieces" (Viking Studio 2000) by famous collector Gareth Williams.
Discussing sets of the late 18th century, he writes:

"Red and white are the colors of St. George, England's patron
saint ... Whoever decided to introduce the color red to oppose white
not only created an attractive color combination but also ensured
patriotic patronage from a potential source of major customers, namely
the English gentry."

Later, in the 19th century, red and white became more or less
standard throughout the European chess world, perhaps due to the pre-
eminence of English players, and/or England's pre-eminence in
international trade and industry.

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Old March 27th 07, 04:02 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
Rob Rob is offline
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Default Ivory Dye Questions

On Mar 27, 8:50 am, "Taylor Kingston"
wrote:
On Mar 26, 1:43 pm, "B. Lafferty" wrote:



Most 19th century ivory chess set have red for the dark pieces.
1. What was the dye used?
2. Why was red the primary color choice?


I haven't been able to find anything on the nature of the dye, but
there is an explanation for the choice of red on page 40 of "Master
Pieces" (Viking Studio 2000) by famous collector Gareth Williams.
Discussing sets of the late 18th century, he writes:

"Red and white are the colors of St. George, England's patron
saint ... Whoever decided to introduce the color red to oppose white
not only created an attractive color combination but also ensured
patriotic patronage from a potential source of major customers, namely
the English gentry."

Later, in the 19th century, red and white became more or less
standard throughout the European chess world, perhaps due to the pre-
eminence of English players, and/or England's pre-eminence in
international trade and industry.


Is that a reference to the "War of the Roses"?

I would sugggest contact Frank Camarrata about this. He has a
wonderful private collection at his home and has a vast abount of
knowledge on this subject.
Rob

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Old March 27th 07, 05:01 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Ivory Dye Questions

On Mar 27, 10:02 am, "Rob" wrote:
On Mar 27, 8:50 am, "Taylor Kingston"
wrote:





On Mar 26, 1:43 pm, "B. Lafferty" wrote:


Most 19th century ivory chess set have red for the dark pieces.
1. What was the dye used?
2. Why was red the primary color choice?


I haven't been able to find anything on the nature of the dye, but
there is an explanation for the choice of red on page 40 of "Master
Pieces" (Viking Studio 2000) by famous collector Gareth Williams.
Discussing sets of the late 18th century, he writes:


"Red and white are the colors of St. George, England's patron
saint ... Whoever decided to introduce the color red to oppose white
not only created an attractive color combination but also ensured
patriotic patronage from a potential source of major customers, namely
the English gentry."


Later, in the 19th century, red and white became more or less
standard throughout the European chess world, perhaps due to the pre-
eminence of English players, and/or England's pre-eminence in
international trade and industry.


Is that a reference to the "War of the Roses"?


No. The Wars of the Roses occurred circa 1455-1487. The references I
made were to events at least 300 years later. The red and white flag
of St. George was used as England's national colors as early as the
1200s, well before the dynastic civil conflict between the houses of
York and Lancaster.

I would sugggest contact Frank Camarrata about this. He has a
wonderful private collection at his home and has a vast abount of
knowledge on this subject.


Frank is indeed an avid chess set collector and may well know about
the dyes used on sets of the 1800s.

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