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Old June 23rd 11, 12:21 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Apr 2007
Posts: 3,170
Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

Five Crazy PerfectChessmate games pgn
PerfectChessmate is an old chess program, probably circa era
Windows95, it works fine in XP. The program has a set of rated
opponents to play against with various ratings up into the Grandmaster
level. The program does offer a unique playing style and will play
some out of the ordinary choices which can throw off those who do not
encounter a lot of gambit or unusual opening play. I played a set of
games that I saved to pgn, posted here for those interested. (The
games were 15 minutes each with no bonus time, and I used 5-10 minutes
usually, so I was playing quickly.) The openings are an Old Benoni
(A43), French Exchange (C01), Quinteros Sicilian (B27), Reversed Grob
(B00), Polish Defense (A40). I recommend loading these into a pgn
viewing program. I wrote my own annotations, let me know if you have
some alternate ideas, thanks.

[Event "Perfect Chessmate Game"]
[Site "Coffee Shop"]
[Date "2010.02.09"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Matt Thomas"]
[Black "Mark Stiegel v.1.0 elo 1956"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A43"]
[Opening "Old Benoni defence"]

1. d4 c5 {The computer program, PerfectChessmate, throws me a
challenge on the
first move, with an Old Benoni defense, A43.} 2. c3 {I do not really
know the
Old Benoni opening, so I create a pawn structure like a reversed Caro-
Kann to
resolve d4.} 2... cxd4 3. cxd4 {Black obtained no real gains from the
opening,
except a possible futile check by ...Qa5, Bd2 and white is fine.} 3...
e6
{Activating Bf8, black may play for a French pawn structure with ...d5
to take
control of e4.} 4. Nf3 {Playing to castle rapidly.} 4... Qf6 {(+/=) ?
The queen
gains nothing for black at f6, better is ...Nf6, so a tempo is lost
casually.}
5. e3 {Also possible was 5.e4, but after ...d5 white must play either
Nc3 or
exd5 instead of playing the bishop.} 5... Nc6 {?! The knight may
support a move
like ...Bb4, but white has obvious intent for kingside castling, so by
playing
a3 will stop any ambitions by black at b4.} 6. a3 {Prevents check and
any useful
development of Nc6.} 6... Qf5 {? A pathetic move that loses black yet
another
tempo after Bd3.} 7. Bd3 {(+/-) White obtains a free game and takes a
lead in
development.} 7... Qg4 {The queen has little to gain here and can be
threatened
in many ways.} 8. O-O Bd6 {Normally a good development for the bishop,
but with
d7 a backward pawn, this move is a little weak. Black tries to create
attacking
prospects towards h2, but Nf3 prevents this.} 9. Nbd2 {This prevents
exchanges
from taking away Nf3.} 9... Nf6 10. Re1 {With plans for e4, and maybe
e5 if
possible.} 10... b5 {?! The pawn is undefended, but could be offered
in
sacrifice to gain some play for the rook.} 11. e4 {Declining to play
Bxb5
because Rb8 has aims for a rook lift that may cause white some
problems. Instead
the threat of playing e5 is strong.} 11... Nxd4 {(+-) ?? This move
would only
have been good if black had the queen aligned on h2.} 12. Nxd4 Qxd1
{?? An
error, black is materially disadvantaged, this improves whites game.}
13. Rxd1
O-O 14. Re1 {Renewing the threat of pushing e5, which opens a bishop
line and
improves whites position.} 14... b4 {(++-) ?? This allows white to
make gains,
better is ...Bc5, Nxb5 to prevent the loss of the knight at f6.} 15.
e5 Bb7 {The
best black had was ...Bc5, but still after Nb3 white still gains a
piece.}
16. exd6 {Also possible was exf6, but the bishops pair can pose more
problems.}
16... Rfc8 {If only black had some means to really use the open file,
better was
....bxa3, to get some use out of the pawn.} 17. axb4 Ng4 {? The knight
has
absolutely no prospects here.} 18. h3 Nf6 19. Nb5 {With intent of
Nc7.} 19... a6
{This prevents a return trip from the knight to b5, if black can hold
the pawn.}
20. Nc7 Ra7 21. b5 {Taking advantage of the weak rook at a7.} 21...
Nd5
{Prevents b6 which forces a winning exchange for white.} 22. bxa6
{This creates
the possiblility of connected passed pawns, and creates the threat of
mate by
axb7 Rxa1??, bxc8Q# or simply gaining another piece with axb7 Rxb7.}
22... Bc6
{Essential.} 23. Be4 {Playing for exchanges.} 23... Nf6 24. Bxc6 dxc6
25. Ne4
Nxe4 {?? Black should not exchange.} 26. Rxe4 Rb8 27. b4 {? Here I
completely
miss the winning move of Be3!} (27. Be3 Raa8 (27... Rba8 28. Nxa8 Rxa8
29. d7
Rd8 30. a7 Kf8 31. a8=Q Rxa8 32. Rxa8+ Ke7 33. d8=Q#) 28. a7 Rxa7 29.
Rxa7)
27... h6 28. Rc4 {Still operating with blindness to Be3.} 28... Kf8
29. Bd2 Kg8
{The unfortunate king is cut off by the knight and pawn.} 30. Rxc6 Rc8
31. Rb6
{O well, not as good as Be3, but it still gets the job done.} 31... g5
32. Rb7
Rxb7 33. axb7 Rd8 {There is no better move for the rook.} 34. Ra8 {An
assured
win.} 34... Rb8 35. Rxb8+ Kh7 36. Ra8 Kg6 37. b8=Q g4 38. hxg4 h5 39.
Qh8
{Taking away escape squares for the king.} 39... hxg4 40. Qh6+
{Missing d7 for a
faster win.} (40. d7 Kf5 (40... e5 41. d8=Q e4 42. Qdf6#) 41. d8=Q Ke4
42. Qhf6
g3 43. Qdd4#) (40. Ra5 f6 41. Rh5 f5 (41... e5 42. Qh7#) 42. Rh6+ Kf7
43. Qf6+
Kg8 44. Rh8#) 40... Kf5 {Only move.} 41. Qg5+ Ke4 {Only move.} 42.
Qf4+ Kd3
{Only move, note the knight contribution.} 43. Ra3+ Kc2 {Ke2 is no
better.} (
43... Ke2 44. Bc1 Ke1 45. Qd2#) 44. Rc3+ Kb1 45. b5 {Clearance for
Qb4+}
45... f6 46. Qb4+ Ka2 47. Ra3# {A clumsy, yet effective mate.} 1-0

[Event "Perfect Chessmate Game"]
[Site "Coffee Shop"]
[Date "2010.02.09"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Matt Thomas"]
[Black "Mark Stiegel v.1.0 elo 1956"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C01"]
[Opening "French: exchange variation"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 {A French opening, becomes the exchange variation,
C01.}
3. exd5 {Playing for the initiative, instead of 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Bf5
5.Ng3 Bg6
which gives black a developed bishop and white a poorly placed
knight.}
3... exd5 4. Nf3 {Rapid castling.} 4... Bb4+ {? This loses a tempo.}
5. c3 Be7
{Better is ...Bd6 where the bishop is more active.} 6. Bb5+ {!? Here
white
appears to be playing a similarly poor move, but the idea is to
get ...c6, which
may lead black to castle kingside and takes away ...Nc6. Black could
always just
play ...Nc6 in response, but either way white is now prepared to
castle.}
6... c6 7. Ba4 {?! Objectively better is Bd3 before black can
play ...Bf5.}
7... b5 {?! Now white is certain where black will be castling, better
is
....Bf5.} 8. Bc2 Qd6 {? A waste of tempo, no advantage is gained from
this move,
better is ...Nf6.} 9. O-O Nf6 10. Ne5 {The knight gains an outpost for
the
moment where it blocks the queen.} 10... b4 11. c4 {Avoiding the
exchange with
the c pawn gives white more play for the pawn, if ...dxc4 then Nxc4
gains tempo
on the queen, but if no pawn exchange then c5 also gains tempo on the
queen.}
11... Nbd7 {Black wants to exchange away the knight at e5, the price
will be a
loss of tempo.} 12. c5 Qc7 {? The queen will face another loss of
tempo here.}
13. Bf4 {Threatens Nd3!} 13... Ba6 14. Re1 {Now white plays against
Be7.}
14... Qa5 {?? This loses a piece to tactics, better is ...Nxe5, Bxe5
Qd8, after
which black loses pawn structure but remains in the game.} (14... Nxe5
15. Bxe5
Qd8 16. Bxf6 gxf6 17. Qf3 Kf8 18. Nd2) 15. Nxc6 {! A forceful tactic,
forking
queen and bishop with a double attack on the bishop.} 15... Qb5 16.
Rxe7+ {!?
Nxe7 is an alternative that leads to a lot of involved lines. I chose
Rxe7+
because it also plays to a win.} (16. Nxe7 Ne4 17. f3 Kxe7 18. fxe4
Rhc8
19. exd5+ Kf8 20. Bxh7 g6 21. Bd6+ Kg7 22. Bxg6 fxg6 23. Re7+ Kh6 24.
Nd2 Re8
25. Rf7 Rg8 26. Qg4 Rg7 (26... Qe2 27. Nf3 g5 28. Bf4 gxf4 29. Qh4+
Kg6 30. Qh7#) (
26... Qb8 27. Qh4#) 27. Qh4#) 16... Kf8 17. Bd6 {! The knight is
offered in a
psuedo sacrifice, white will gain a knight as well next move.} 17...
Qxc6
18. Rxd7+ Kg8 {Better is ...Ke8, but the conclusion is the same.}
(18... Ke8
19. Re7+ (19. Rxf7 Kd8 20. Rxg7 Qe8 21. Re7 Qb5) 19... Kd8 20. Bf5 Bc8
21. Rc7
Qe8 22. Bxc8 Rxc8 23. Rxa7 Nd7 24. Nd2 Qe6 25. Qb3 Re8 26. h3 g5 27.
Qxb4 g4 (
27... Nb8 28. Qb6+ Rc7 29. Qxc7#) 28. Qa5+ Rc7 29. Qxc7#) 19. Rc7
{Keeping the
rook and gaining a tempo.} 19... Qe8 20. Nd2 {Just improving the
position, white
is unconcerned with ...Qe2 because exchanges make the win easier.}
20... Be2
{Gains a tempo, but what else?} 21. Qc1 Qd8 {?! Giving up e8 allows
white to
take control of it by Ba4.} 22. Ba4 {Now white can play to sieze the e
file.}
22... a5 {Black has no promising moves and so improves the pawns.} 23.
Nf1 {?
This allows black to get counterplay, better is Qe1.} (23. Qe1 Ba6 24.
Qe5 Rc8
25. Re7 Bb7 26. Bc7 Qf8 27. Re1 h5 28. Bd7 Ra8 29. Bd6 Ng4 30. Qe2 g6
31. Re8
Rxe8 32. Bxe8 Qg7 33. Qe7 Ba6 34. Nf3 Bd3 35. Ng5 Bf5 36. Bxf7+ Qxf7
37. Qxf7#)
23... Ne4 {Threatening the bishop, defender of the rook.} 24. Bf4 g5
25. Be5
Bxf1 26. Kxf1 {Keeps the queen in play.} 26... f6 27. Rd7 Qc8 28. Bxf6
{??
Better is Bc7 with threat of Rd8+ and a chance to gain back a piece,
this just
loses the bishop without compensation.} (28. Bc7 Qf8 29. f3 Nxc5 30.
dxc5 h6
31. Bd6 Qc8 32. Re7 Qa6+ 33. Kg1 Rh7 34. Rxh7 Kxh7 35. c6 Rc8 36. Qc5
Qd3 37. c7
Qf5 38. Bc6 Qg6 39. Bb7 Rg8 40. c8=Q Rxc8 41. Bxc8) 28... Qa6+ 29. Kg1
Qxf6
30. c6 {Pushing the passed pawn while offering d4 to gain ground.}
30... Qxd4
{...Qxf2+ does not help.} (30... Qxf2+ 31. Kh1 Rf8 32. c7 h6 33. Rd8
Rh7
34. c8=Q Rf7 35. Rxf8+ Rxf8 36. Qe6+ Kh8 37. Qxd5 Nd2 38. Qe5+ Kg8 39.
Bb3+ Kh7
40. Qc2+ Rf5 41. Qcxf5+ Qxf5 42. Qxf5+ Kg7 43. Qf7+ Kh8 44. Qg8#) 31.
Qe1
{Prevents ...Qxf2.} 31... Nc5 {A fork.} 32. Re7 {! Indirectly protects
Ba4.}
32... Kf8 {Black avoids Qe6+ so to allow ...Nxa4.} (32... Nxa4 33.
Qe6+ Kf8
34. Qf7#) 33. c7 {!? Adding a threat of pawn promotion in exchange for
the
bishop.} 33... Nxa4 {? ...Qf6 is essential.} (33... Qf6 34. Bc6 Rc8
35. Qe3 Ne6
36. Re8+ Rxe8 37. Bxe8 Nxc7 38. Bh5 Kg7 39. Re1 Kh6 40. g4 Rd8 41. Qa7
Ne6
42. Qxa5 Ng7 43. Qxb4 Nxh5 44. gxh5 Kxh5 45. Rd1 d4 46. Rd3 Qe5 47. a4
Rb8
48. Qa3 Rc8 49. b4) 34. Qe6 {Threatens Qf7#} 34... Qf4 35. Rd7 Nxb2 {?
Better is
....Rc8, now the win is forced.} (35... Rc8 36. Rd8+ Kg7 (36... Rxd8
37. cxd8=Q+
Kg7 38. Qde7+ Qf7 39. Q7xf7#) 37. Rxc8 Rxc8 38. Qxc8 Qf7 39. Qb8 Qf4
40. g3 Qe5
41. c8=Q) (35... Nb6 36. Qxb6) (35... Re8 36. Rd8 Qf7 37. Qxf7+ Kxf7
38. Rxe8
Rxe8 39. Rc1 Nb6 40. Rc5 Rc8 41. Rxa5 Rxc7 42. Rb5 Nc4 43. Rxb4) 36.
Qe7+ Kg8
37. Qg7# 1-0

[Event "Perfect Chessmate Game"]
[Site "Coffee Shop"]
[Date "2010.02.09"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Matt Thomas"]
[Black "Mark Stiegel v.1.0 elo 1956"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B27"]
[Opening "Sicilian: Quinteros variation"]

1. e4 c5 {A Sicilian opening.} 2. Nf3 Qc7 {An early queen move seems
unpromising for black. The opening is a Quinteros variation of the
Sicilian,
B27.} 3. Nc3 {I could have just played d4, but I was suspicious of
this opening,
and so chose to cover e4 with the knight instead.} (3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4
Qe5 (
4... e5 5. Nf3 Bb4+ 6. c3 Bc5 7. Bc4 Nf6 8. Ng5 O-O 9. O-O) 5. Nc3 Nf6
6. Bd3 e6
7. O-O Bc5 8. Nf3 Qc7) 3... Qf4 {? Losing a tempo.} 4. d3 {I avoid
playing d4 so
that I can achieve castling quickly.} 4... Qd6 5. Nb5 {?! Not really a
necessary
move, this just shifts the queen off of a few dark squares.} 5... Qb6
6. Nc3
{The knight moves before it is chased by ...a6.} 6... Nf6 {Black
hastens to
prevent Nd5.} 7. Be2 {White plays a tight formation, but development
is good.}
7... Nc6 8. O-O e5 {Black achieves a bind against d4, a good place for
a dark
knight.} (8... Nd4 9. Nxd4 cxd4 10. Nd5 Nxd5 11. exd5 e5 12. dxe6
dxe6) 9. a3
{Prevents ...Nb4.} 9... Bd6 {? The bishop is better developed at e7,
here it
just becomes a big pawn.} 10. Nh4 {The knight is free to be developed
unopposed
because there is no bishop or queen influence on the dark diagonal.}
10... Nd4
{The knight drops into a nice outpost where it threatens the bishop.}
11. Bg4
{!? Exchanging the bishop for the other knight is more favorable, and
it will
indirectly protect c2 because of the threat of Qxg7.} 11... Nxg4 12.
Qxg4 h5 {?
Black weakens the pawn structure too much with this move.} 13. Qd1 {I
had not
considered Qxg7 well enough, it is the better move.} (13. Qxg7 Rf8 14.
Nd5 Nxc2 (
14... Be7 15. Bh6 Qd6 16. c3 Nc6 17. Nf5 Qg6 18. Nc7+ Kd8 19. Nxa8
Qxg7 20. Bxg7
Rg8 21. b4 cxb4 22. cxb4 Bf8 23. Bf6+ Be7 24. Nxe7 Nxe7 25. Bxe5 Ng6
26. Bg3 h4
27. Bd6 b6 28. Nc7) 15. Nf6+ Kd8 16. Rb1 Nd4 17. Bg5 Be7 18. Nd5 Qe6
19. Bxe7+
Ke8 20. Qxf8#) 13... c4 14. Nf3 {To remove the knight at d4.} 14...
cxd3
15. cxd3 Nxf3+ {Black avoids doubled pawns on the d file.} 16. Qxf3 h4
17. h3
{Stopping any plans on the h file.} 17... Be7 {This frees a line for
the queen
or enables ...d6 to free the c8 bishop.} 18. Nd5 {! Taking the bishops
advantage
form black by force.} 18... Qc6 {Better is ...Qd6 to recapture with
the queen,
and not ...Qe6?? because of Nc7+!} 19. Nxe7 Kxe7 {(+-) White has an
advantage by
having a castled king, better bishop, and free play against the king
in the
center.} 20. b4 {Opening b2 for the bishop and gaining space.} 20...
d6 {An
improvement which frees the bishop.} 21. Qe2 {The idea is to play f4
for a pawn
break.} 21... f6 {Black counters the idea.} 22. f4 {! Played anyway
because if
fxe5 dxe5 then the d file opens with Bb2 and d4 to follow to open the
center, or
fxe5 fxe5 opens the f file.} 22... Qc3 23. Bd2 {? Here I overlook the
better Bb2
which chases the queen and supports an attack at e5.} 23... Qb2 24.
fxe5
{Continuing the plan, the queen is not expected to recapture because
then an
isolated pawn remains.} 24... dxe5 25. Rfb1 {Now white has to make up
for not
playing Bb2.} 25... Qd4+ 26. Be3 Qd8 27. Rd1 {Preparing d4.} 27... Be6
28. d4
exd4 29. Rxd4 {This seems a better choice than Bxd4 because ...b6
gains a tempo
on the bishop, and because the rooks could be doubled on the d file.}
29... Qc7
30. Rdd1 {I dropped the idea of doubling the rooks because with blacks
prior
move d8 is prepared for ...Rhd8, so if white plays Rad1 and
black ...Rhd8, after
exchanges black has control of the d file. But with the text move
white controls
the d file after exchanges.} (30. Rad1 Rhd8 31. Rxd8 Rxd8 32. Rxd8
Qxd8)
30... Qe5 {Not really a threat to the rook after ...Rhd8.} (30... Rhd8
31. Rxd8
Rxd8 32. Rd1 Rxd1+ 33. Qxd1) 31. Bc5+ (31. Bf2 Rhd8 32. Rxd8 Qxa1+ 33.
Qd1 Qxd1+
34. Rxd1) 31... Kf7 32. Bd6 Qc3 33. Bc5 Rad8 {Better is ...b6.} 34.
Rdc1
{Attempting to play for Rc7.} 34... Qe5 35. Bxa7 Bxh3 36. Rd1 {??
Better is to
accept the sacrifice with gxh3.} (36. gxh3 Rh6 37. Kf1 Rg6 38. Rab1
Qg3 39. Bf2
Qg2+ 40. Ke1 Qh1+ 41. Qf1 Qxe4+ 42. Qe2 Qf4 43. Rc4 Qh6 44. Re4 Kg8
45. Re8+
Rxe8 46. Qxe8+ Kh7 47. Qe4 Kh8 48. Rd1 Qg5 49. Rd8+ Kh7 50. Qxb7)
36... Bf5
37. Re1 h3 38. g3 h2+ (38... Qxg3+ 39. Kh1 Bg4 40. Qc4+ Be6 41. Qe2)
39. Kh1 Ra8 (
39... Bh3 40. Qc4+ Kg6 41. Qe2 Ra8 42. Bf2) 40. Bf2 g5 {?? Black flubs
big
time.} 41. exf5 Qxf5 42. Qe7+ Kg6 43. Qe4 {With accurate play this
should win.}
43... Qxe4+ 44. Rxe4 f5 45. Re6+ Kf7 46. Rae1 Rae8 47. Rxe8 Rxe8 48.
Rxe8 Kxe8
49. Kxh2 Ke7 50. Be3 Ke6 51. Bxg5 Kd5 52. Kh3 Kd4 53. Kh4 Kd5 54. Bf6
Ke4
55. Kg5 b5 56. Be7 {? I overlook the winning idea of bishop on the a1
diagonal
and playing a4! bxa4, b5. Black can not stop both the b and g pawns.}
56... Ke5
57. Bc5 Ke4 58. Bf8 {Realizing the correct plan, the bishop will play
to g7.}
58... Ke5 59. Bg7+ Ke4 60. a4 bxa4 61. b5 a3 62. b6 a2 63. b7 f4 64.
gxf4 Kf3
65. b8=Q Ke2 66. Qb2+ {No reason to leave black any good counterplay.}
66... Ke3
67. Qxa2 Kf3 68. Qd2 {There is a box around the king who can
play ...Ke4 but not
pass the 5th rank or d file.} 68... Kg3 69. Qe3+ Kh2 70. Be5 {Far
better is the
uncomplicated 70.Kg4} (70. Kg4 Kg2 71. Qe2+ Kg1 72. Kg3 Kh1 73. Qg2#)
70... Kg2
71. f5 Kh1 72. Kg4 Kg2 73. Qf3+ Kg1 74. Bd4+ Kh2 75. Qf2+ Kh1 76. Qg1#
1-0

[Event "Perfect Chessmate Game"]
[Site "Coffee Shop"]
[Date "2010.02.09"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Matt Thomas"]
[Black "Mark Stiegel v.1.0 elo 1956"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B00"]
[Opening "Reversed Grob (Borg/Basman defence/macho Grob)"]

1. e4 g5 {This opening, a Reversed Grob is just dubious.} 2. d4
{Ignoring g5
and developing the center, the pawn is expected to be guarded on
blacks move.}
2... Bh6 3. Nc3 {The plan is to castle queenside, which almost seems
counter
intuitive, but white has Be3 to block influence on that diagonal.
Playing h4?!
against the pawn brings white no merit because Bh6 is guarded.} 3...
Nc6 4. Bd2
{?! Here I play a gambit which results in prying the black king out of
the back
rank, thanks in part to black.} 4... Nxd4 5. Be3 Ne6 6. Bd4 Nxd4 7.
Qxd4 Nf6 {?
A positional error.} (7... f6 8. e5 d6 9. exf6 Nxf6 10. O-O-O g4+ 11.
Kb1 e5
12. Qa4+ Bd7 13. Bb5 Qe7 14. Bxd7+ Nxd7) 8. e5 Nh5 {Its either this
square or
back to g8.} 9. e6 {Attacking the rook.} 9... Bg7 10. exf7+ {! The
king is
forced to give up his seat at e8, and the queen remains safe for the
moment.}
10... Kxf7 11. Bc4+ {I switch into attack mode.} 11... e6 12. Qg4 Nf4
13. O-O-O
{Activating a rook while removing the king from future threats.} 13...
d5 {Black
makes some tempo gaining moves, but the downside is the draft around
the king
afterwards.} 14. Bb3 h5 15. Qf3 Qf6 16. g3 g4 17. Qe3 Ng2 18. Qc5
{Threatening
Qxc7+} 18... Bd7 19. Qxc7 {Pinning the bishop which is threatened
along with
b7.} 19... Rad8 20. Ba4 {An absolute pin holds the bishop firmly in
place.}
20... b5 {?? Giving up a pawn for no reason.} 21. Bxb5 Qe7 {This
breaks the
pin.} 22. Bxd7 {Exchaning bishops takes away some advantage for black,
and the
bishop was a problem for white due to the black pawn structure. Now
white has
two knights which can be effective.} 22... Rxd7 23. Qa5 Qf6 24. Nge2
{The only
move.} 24... Qxf2 {?? Losing the queen.} 25. Rhf1 Qf3 {Better is to
just take
the plunge with ...Qxf1, Rxf1+} 26. Rxf3+ gxf3 {Black was counting on
making a
pawn promotion, but that is a bit optimistic.} 27. Rf1 Kg8 28. Rxf3
Be5 29. Qb4
{Accessing the 4th rank.} 29... Kg7 {Freeing Rh8 laterally.} 30. g4
{Enticing
....hxg4??, Qxg4+ to gain the knight.} 30... Ne1 {This does not really
work
because of the unprotected bishop, and after white plays Re3 Bf6, gxh5
Rxh5,
Qg4+ Rg5, Qxe6 black finds more problems.} 31. Re3 Ng2 {?? Loses the
bishop.}
32. Rxe5 Kf7 33. gxh5 Rg8 {...Rxh5 was essential.} 34. h6 {The pawn
becomes
stronger.} 34... Rg6 35. h7 Kg7 36. Rh5 {A real danger of promotion
exists now.}
36... Rd8 {Unfortunately for black this is not enough to save the
day.} 37. Qe7+
{The win is not far now.} 37... Kh8 {The only move.} 38. Qxd8+ Kg7 39.
h8=Q+ Kf7
40. Qh7+ {? Best is 40.Qhf8#} (40. Qhf8#) 40... Rg7 41. Qd7+ Kf6 42.
Qhxg7# 1-0

[Event "Perfect Chessmate Game"]
[Site "Coffee Shop"]
[Date "2010.02.09"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Matt Thomas"]
[Black "Mark Stiegel v.1.0 elo 1956"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A40"]
[Opening "Polish defence"]

1. d4 b5 {The Polish opening, definitely dubious.} 2. e4 {Taking the
center.}
2... Ba6 {Black plays this opening just like the Reversed Grob. White
is still
fine in this opening and has no development problems.} 3. Nf3 {This
assures
....e5 will not be played immediately and prepares kingside castling.}
3... e6
4. Be2 {Developing the bishop short in case I want to use it on the
kingside.}
4... Nf6 5. Nbd2 {Supporting e4.} 5... Nc6 6. O-O Be7 7. a4 {The pawn
is pinned
because the bishop is unsupported.} 7... d5 {? White threatens a fork
by axb5!}
8. axb5 $1 dxe4 9. Nxe4 {Its true that white could have retreated the
knight and
gained a piece, but this move has positional merits.} (9. Nb3 Nxd4 10.
Nbxd4 Bb7)
9... Nxe4 10. bxa6 Qd5 11. c4 {Gaining some tempo.} 11... Qd7 12. d5
{Forcing a
pawn break.} 12... Bc5 {?? Losing the knight is unecessary.} 13. dxc6
Qxc6
14. Ne5 {! Displacing the queen from the light diagonal gives white
attacking
force.} 14... Qd6 15. Qa4+ Ke7 16. Nc6+ Kf8 17. Be3 {The rooks become
tied.}
17... Bxe3 {? This actually helps white open a rook line on the king.}
18. fxe3
Kg8 19. Bf3 Nd2 20. Rad1 {The rook takes control of the d file, and
with support
threatens the queen.} 20... Nxf3+ {The knight would not have been safe
for long
on d2, and the queen is safe for the moment because of the check.} 21.
Rxf3 Qc5
22. b4 {Distracting the queen from the dark diagonal.} 22... Qxc4 23.
Ne7+ Kf8
{This move is not good enough and gives white good counterplay.} 24.
Qd7 f6
{Seems like ...g6 is better to give the king an out.} 25. Nc6
{Clearance for
Qe7+, and black can not stop the move because of the b4 pawn
controlling c5.}
25... e5 {Giving the black queen access to f7.} 26. Qe7+ Kg8 27. Rd7
Qc1+
{Desperation, the mate is forced.} (27... Rf8 28. Qxg7#) 28. Rf1 Qxe3+
29. Kh1
Rb8 30. Qxg7# 1-0
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Old June 23rd 11, 12:39 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

I have posted these games - annotated by proponent Matt Thomas - to
illustrate a point made by The Master (aka Colossal Blunder):

"Whenever I play over a human-annotated game (which is not very
often anymore) I use the author's exclamation points as indicators of
where it is most likely that a bad (not a brilliant) move was played.
And where my chess engine finds a decisive error it is usually the
case that the human annotator has deliberately passed over the key
blunder, wishing instead to point out some clever ploy by the winner
that only worked on account of considerable help from his unlucky
opponent -- help which could not possibly have been correctly
anticipated, despite the author's delusions to the contrary."

I am paying for the phrase: "Whenever I play over a human-annotated
game I use the author's exclamation points as indicators of where it
is most likely that a bad move was played" to be inscribed in letters
20 foot tall in the side of Porcupine Butte mountain, South Dakota.
Work begins tomorrow.
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Old June 23rd 11, 01:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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On Jun 23, 2:39*pm, Offramp wrote:
I have posted these games - annotated by proponent Matt Thomas - to
illustrate a point made by The Master (aka Colossal Blunder):


Something went wrong -- too much annotation I guess--because here is
the game I got without comments when I cut and paste the above:


1. d4 c5 2. c3 cxd4 3. cxd4 e6 4. Nf3 Qf6 5. e3 Nc6 6. a3 Qf5 7. Bd3
Qg4 8. O-O
Bd6 9. Nbd2 Nf6 10. Re1 b5 11. e4 Nxd4 12. Nxd4 Qxd1 13. Rxd1 O-O 14.
Re1 b4
15. e5 Bb7 16. exd6 Rfc8 17. axb4 Ng4 18. h3 Nf6 19. Nb5 a6 20. Nc7
Ra7 21. b5
Nd5 22. bxa6 Bc6 23. Be4 Nf6 24. Bxc6 dxc6 25. Ne4 Nxe4 26. Rxe4 Rb8
27. b4 h6
28. Rc4 Kf8 29. Bd2 Kg8 30. Rxc6 Rc8 31. Rb6 g5 32. Rb7 Rxb7 33. axb7
Rd8 34.
Ra8 Rb8 35. Rxb8+ Kh7 36. Ra8 Kg6 37. b8=Q g4 38. hxg4 h5 39. Qh8 hxg4
40. Qh6+
Kf5 41. Qg5+ Ke4 42. Qf4+ Kd3 43. Ra3+ Kc2 44. Rc3+ Kb1 45. b5 f6 46.
Qb4+ Ka2
47. Ra3# *

Is this the game you played? I cannot imagine any PC playing that
poorly--what processor did it have?

RL
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Old June 23rd 11, 01:15 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

On Jun 23, 1:06*pm, raylopez99 wrote:

Is this the game you played? *I cannot imagine any PC playing that
poorly--what processor did it have?


I am not Matt Thomas. I am Alan O'Brien. A paddy not a taff.
I put these games into chessbase with no problems whatsoever -
annotations and all. Only The Great Architect of the Universe knows
what you are doing wrong.
The chess program s a very old one. It was designed for Windows 95 and
is weak.
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Old June 23rd 11, 09:41 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

On Jun 23, 3:15*pm, Offramp wrote:
On Jun 23, 1:06*pm, raylopez99 wrote:

Is this the game you played? *I cannot imagine any PC playing that
poorly--what processor did it have?


I am not Matt Thomas. I am Alan O'Brien. A paddy not a taff.
I put these games into chessbase with no problems whatsoever -
annotations and all. Only The Great Architect of the Universe knows
what you are doing wrong.
The chess program s a very old one. It was designed for Windows 95 and
is weak.


I don't care who you are, and I realized you were not the original
poster, but was the game in question what I posted? If it was wrong,
where did it go wrong? It looks like a game of Suicide Chess.

RL


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Old June 24th 11, 01:00 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

I AM NOT MATT THOMAS!!
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Old June 24th 11, 01:44 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

On Jun 24, 3:00*am, Offramp wrote:
I AM NOT MATT THOMAS!!


No need to shout. Calm down.

I'm OK, you're OK.

RL
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Old June 24th 11, 01:44 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default An interesting post from ChessForums.org

On Jun 24, 3:44*am, raylopez99 wrote:
On Jun 24, 3:00*am, Offramp wrote:

I AM NOT MATT THOMAS!!


No need to shout. Calm down.

I'm OK, you're OK.

RL


And because The Minor may read this thread, Black is OK.

RL
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