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Old January 14th 13, 02:42 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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Default David Bronstein 1951 Match and From Russia With Love

David Bronstein 1951 Match and From Russia With Love

There is a connection between the 1957 book "From Russia With Love"
and the book "The World Chess Championship 1951".

This is because in the opening scene in the book and the movie "From
Russia With Love" the protagonist villain Kronsteen is playing a chess
match for the chess championship when he is summoned by his KGB
Handler and ordered to lose the match.

Kronsteen disobeys the order, wins the match and, as punishment for
disobeying the order, is sent off on a mission to kill James Bond.

Many do not realize that this is based on an incident that actually
occurred in real life.

The real chess player was named Bronstein, not Kronsteen, and he was
on the verge of winning the match for the World Chess Championship in
1951 when he suddenly mysteriously resigned the game and the match.

Ever since chess players have been wondering why he resigned when he
seemed to be winning. David Bronstein died on December 5, 2006 and up
until the day he died chess players were asking him if it was really
true that the KGB had ordered him to resign the game and the match.

Bronstein complained that he had been asked that question endlessly,
yet he never gave a reasonable answer to that question.

However, unlike the character in the novel, David Bronstein was not
ordered to kill FIDE Chess World Championship Arbiter Hal Bond, unlike
Kronsteen who was ordered to kill James Bond.

As a reward for throwing the match to Botvinnik in 1951 and then
keeping this a secret, David Bronstein (February 19, 1924 December
5, 2006) was allowed to live to age 82, unlike the book and movie
character Kronsteen who disobeys the order and as a result dies while
trying to kill James Bond.

Since Bronstein was not ordered to kill Hal Bond, that Bond too still
is alive, although he would have survived anyway as Kronsteen the
movie character did not succeed in killing James Bond.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878295
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878295

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871876462
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871876462

The above links do not work yet but will soon in a week or two, when
the books come out.

Sam Sloan
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Old January 14th 13, 06:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default David Bronstein 1951 Match and From Russia With Love

On Monday, January 14, 2013 4:42:28 PM UTC+2, samsloan wrote:

Since Bronstein was not ordered to kill Hal Bond, that Bond too still

is alive, although he would have survived anyway as Kronsteen the

movie character did not succeed in killing James Bond.


Do you know how Kronsteen was killed in the book? In the movie? He knew that logically it was impossible that his boss would kill him. But...his boss was not logical. That is a mistake only a non-chess player would make!

RL
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