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Old November 6th 14, 04:45 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Saturday, October 25, 2014 12:28:56 PM UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!


Not enough info. In particular, we need to know if the learner is a child or an adult. Presumably "learner" means total beginner here -- someone who needs to know the rules?

Paul Epstein
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Old November 11th 14, 07:28 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

Paul wrote:
On Saturday, October 25, 2014 12:28:56 PM UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!


Not enough info. In particular, we need to know if the learner is a child or an adult. Presumably "learner" means total beginner here -- someone who needs to know the rules?


The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?


--
[Dancing is] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire,
legitimised by music.
G.B. Shaw quoted in /New Statesman/, 23 March 1962

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Old November 11th 14, 10:34 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 7:28:26 PM UTC, Peter Percival wrote:
Paul wrote:
On Saturday, October 25, 2014 12:28:56 PM UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!


Not enough info. In particular, we need to know if the learner is a child or an adult. Presumably "learner" means total beginner here -- someone who needs to know the rules?


The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?


My choice would be Improve Your Chess Now by Jon Tisdall.

Paul Epstein
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Old November 13th 14, 10:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

Paul wrote:
On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 7:28:26 PM UTC, Peter Percival wrote:
Paul wrote:
On Saturday, October 25, 2014 12:28:56 PM UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!

Not enough info. In particular, we need to know if the learner is a child or an adult. Presumably "learner" means total beginner here -- someone who needs to know the rules?


The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?


My choice would be Improve Your Chess Now by Jon Tisdall.

Paul Epstein


Thank you.

--
[Dancing is] a perpendicular expression of a horizontal desire,
legitimised by music.
G.B. Shaw quoted in /New Statesman/, 23 March 1962

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Old November 16th 14, 09:20 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On 11.11.2014 20:28, Peter Percival wrote:
Paul wrote:
On Saturday, October 25, 2014 12:28:56 PM UTC+1, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!


Not enough info. In particular, we need to know if the learner is a
child or an adult. Presumably "learner" means total beginner here --
someone who needs to know the rules?


The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?


If he benefitted to the full from Lasker's Manual, he (or she) is
anything but a beginner!

--
Charles Milton Ling
Vienna, Austria
Gpg4win encryption available


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Old November 17th 14, 09:32 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

Someone should give the inquirer some solid feedback. There are dozens of starting chess books available, pick any of them. The thing that makes a difference is paying attention to what is in the books, not some magic bullet which will propel the inquirer to stardom.

I teach an accredited distance learning chess course to US High Schools [first and only of its kind] and chose a couple of books by Susan Polgar to (a) get started from the basics and (b) to launch one's chess beyond that. Other titles are as good, but these are straightforward instructional materials, with built in tests of comprehension. These books are supplemented by Russian pattern recognition oriented materials designed by Sergei Ivashencko..

The right answer is to find a title which novices can appreciate right away, and which also commends itself as a platform to better chess beyond the basics. To begin is good, to find a good platform beyond tricks and traps requires a little discrimination.

Phil Innes
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Old November 24th 14, 03:30 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 5:32:50 AM UTC+8, Phil Innes wrote:

The right answer is to find a title which novices can appreciate right away, and which also commends itself as a platform to better chess beyond the basics. To begin is good, to find a good platform beyond tricks and traps requires a little discrimination.

Phil Innes



I heard Ray that they are doing a remake of J. Carrey's "Dumb and Dumber". Maybe apply for a cameo in the background?

As for your STU-pid suggestions, they are really dumb. First, you make the sensible claim that any good beginner book is good enough, there's no silver bullet. But then, you err when you claim that to get "beyond tricks and traps" you need a better book, which you don't specify. Clearly you've not read "Move Now, Think Later", which proves that beyond tricks and traps is only native, innate, non-teachable ability in chess, a sort of fluid IQ that cannot be taught (I repeat: cannot be taught, as you are dim-witted). So there's no "beyond".

Stupid is as stupid does. Dumb-ber.

RL
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Old November 29th 14, 07:35 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Sunday, November 23, 2014 10:30:07 PM UTC-5, raylopez99 wrote:
On Tuesday, November 18, 2014 5:32:50 AM UTC+8, Phil Innes wrote:

The right answer is to find a title which novices can appreciate right away, and which also commends itself as a platform to better chess beyond the basics. To begin is good, to find a good platform beyond tricks and traps requires a little discrimination.

Phil Innes



I heard Ray that they are doing a remake of J. Carrey's "Dumb and Dumber".. Maybe apply for a cameo in the background?

As for your STU-pid suggestions, they are really dumb. First, you make the sensible claim that any good beginner book is good enough, there's no silver bullet. But then, you err when you claim that to get "beyond tricks and traps" you need a better book, which you don't specify. Clearly you've not read "Move Now, Think Later", which proves that beyond tricks and traps is only native, innate, non-teachable ability in chess, a sort of fluid IQ that cannot be taught (I repeat: cannot be taught, as you are dim-witted).. So there's no "beyond".

Stupid is as stupid does. Dumb-ber.


Down be so hignerunt! The book which establishes real chess skill [as established by de root] is from Harvard's Howard Gardner, and the special relevance to chess is in the 7th intelligence he names, 'abstract spatial.' At least with even quite strong students I have found that without looking first, there is no depth perception or compass within which linear processing can take place.

It's even true that zen-like you can just look at the board, not look to find something.

In my [ahem] accredited chess course [first and only in the USA for high schools] I use the usual tactical instruction material, but also those interesting Russian books by Sergey Ivaschenko on pattern recognition.

Finally, the metaphor[s] of instructional material needs to have a balance of VAK, Video Audio and Kinesthetic material, since proportions of these are fixed in the student. Better for the student to take in what comes naturally, and the material to be learning-oriented rather than teaching-oriented..

Neglecting these factors result in 'becoming stuck at 1700' syndrome.

Phil Innes



RL

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Old January 25th 15, 08:18 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Saturday, October 25, 2014 at 4:28:56 AM UTC-7, Peter Percival wrote:
Chess book recommendations for a learner please!

_
On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 at 11:28:26 AM UTC-8, Peter Percival wrote:
The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?

_
It is pretty dated now, but I once made a compilation of chess book suggestions:
_
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.g...5f02d24caa5445
_
Some of Dan Heisman's thoughts about chess books can be found at:
_
http://home.comcast.net/~danheisman/...Book_Guide.htm
_
For more Dan Heisman advice, one can turn to:
_
A Guide to Chess Improvement by Dan Heisman
_
IM Jeremy Silman has an article, The Best Chess Books Ever, at
_
http://www.chess.com/article/view/th...ess-books-ever
_
In view of the age of Lasker's book, you might want to get something of a quick modern overview of chess openings. Some possibilities a
_
Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro
Discovering Chess Openings by John Emms
Winning Chess Openings by Yasser Seirawan
Back to Basics : Openings by Carsten Hansen
Chess Openings for Kids by John Watson and Graham Burgess
Improve Your Opening Play by Chris Ward
Concise Chess Openings by Neil McDonald
How to Win at Chess, Volume I by I. A. Horowitz
_
This was my favorite comment from the old rec.games.chess discussion:
_
"Remember, if you like books--like reading them and owning them--there's no such thing as 'one chess book.' ... as you acquire one or two and read them through--even if you don't--you'll find yourself drawn to the chess section every time you walk into Walden's or Barnes and Noble or Borders. If you leaf through the books and compare their contents to what you need, you'll soon find yourself dedicating a shelf or two of your bookcase to chess books. You'll want to have all of Sierawan's books (as soon as they're back in print). You'll yearn to complete your collection of Alburt's series. You'll start haunting used book shops for old copies of Fischer's 'My 60 Memorable Games.' Your hair will gradually grow unkempt, and a distracted wild look will creep into your eyes. If you're separated from your books for too long, your hands will begin to twitch and you'll start plotting knight moves across the checkered tablecloth at the Italian restaurant where you're supposed to be wooing your wife / girlfriend. You've entered a perilous zone .... 'Chessbibliomania' is not a condition to be easily dismissed, and research has shown it isn't curable. Maybe you'll be better off just buying a gin rummy program for your computer and avoiding this chess book madness altogether. Happy reading!!"
_
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.g...6eccf5ddec3c33
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Old January 25th 15, 08:29 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Chess books for learner?

On Tuesday, November 11, 2014 at 11:28:26 AM UTC-8, Peter Percival wrote:
The learner in question has read Emanuel Lasker's 'Manual of Chess' and
found it interesting and instructive. So, what next?

_
On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 12:18:02 PM UTC-8, I wrote:
In view of the age of Lasker's book, you might want to get something of a
quick modern overview of chess openings. Some possibilities a
_
Openings for Amateurs by Pete Tamburro
Discovering Chess Openings by John Emms
Winning Chess Openings by Yasser Seirawan
Back to Basics : Openings by Carsten Hansen
Chess Openings for Kids by John Watson and Graham Burgess
Improve Your Opening Play by Chris Ward
Concise Chess Openings by Neil McDonald
How to Win at Chess, Volume I by I. A. Horowitz

_
I just thought of one mo
_
Understanding the Chess Openings by Sam Collins
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