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Old November 24th 14, 03:38 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The origins of modern chess: Renaissance Europe

Title says it all. Background below.

RL

On Saturday, November 8, 2014 7:40:09 AM UTC+8, Dr. Jai Maharaj wrote:


But his greatest achievement has been that he has single-
handedly made chess popular as a sport in a nation of
over 100 million cricket crazy citizens. The sport which
took birth in India as 'Chaturanga' is played avidly
today and followed in the country chiefly due to the
contributions of this one man.


Well just to state the obvious, Chaturanga, a four person variant of modern chess, in no way resembles modern chess, except to a historian.

Modern chess was invented primarily in Europe, during the Renaissance, when the queen was modified to make her more powerful, as well as other changes such as en passant and the two-square pawn move, and further modified in the 19th century with respect to pawn promotion and the use of clocks.

But hey, if it makes you feel better (after all you live in a squalid southeast Asian country called India/Pakistan), then by all means believe in your myths.

RL
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Old November 24th 14, 03:47 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The origins of modern chess: Renaissance Europe

On Monday, November 24, 2014 11:38:27 AM UTC+8, raylopez99 wrote:
Title says it all. Background below.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaturanga

Correction: it was also a two person game but had no castling and pieces that don't exist today, see more he http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chatura...nd_their_moves

RL
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Old November 24th 14, 09:20 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The origins of modern chess: Renaissance Europe

Best book I've read on the transit of the old game to the new is by Marilynn Yalom, Birth of the Chess Queen - tracking the evolution of the Queen, including sex-change from about the C11th to the C16th where it stopped developing -- and all in parallel to the status of women in Europe, where arguably that also stopped developing until the C20th.
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Old November 25th 14, 02:36 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The origins of modern chess: Renaissance Europe

On Tuesday, November 25, 2014 5:20:30 AM UTC+8, Phil Innes wrote:
Best book I've read on the transit of the old game to the new is by Marilynn Yalom, Birth of the Chess Queen - tracking the evolution of the Queen, including sex-change from about the C11th to the C16th where it stopped developing -- and all in parallel to the status of women in Europe, where arguably that also stopped developing until the C20th.


//

Yes, I have this book, read the first chapter, but have not finished it. Art imitating medieval life...

PI
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Old January 27th 15, 08:17 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The origins of modern chess: Renaissance Europe

On Sunday, November 23, 2014 at 8:38:27 PM UTC-7, raylopez99 wrote:

Modern chess was invented primarily in Europe, during the Renaissance, when
the queen was modified to make her more powerful, as well as other changes
such as en passant and the two-square pawn move, and further modified in the
19th century with respect to pawn promotion and the use of clocks.


But hey, if it makes you feel better (after all you live in a squalid
southeast Asian country called India/Pakistan), then by all means believe in
your myths.


Yes, it is true that major changes to the game of Chess took place in Europe,
making it the game we play today.

However, those were changes to an existing game. The basic layout of the
pieces, and the moves of the King, the Knights, the Rooks, and the Pawns - "the
soul of Chess" - were already there in the game that travelled from India to
Persia, to the Arab world, and finally to Europe.

Chaturanga isn't the Chess we know of today, no. Yet, it was enough like Chess
to fascinate people and to continue to be played for centuries. Had that not
been the case, the game would never have reached Europe *to* be partially
modified so that we could have the game of Chess we now enjoy.

Also, Chinese Chess still uses the old moves, although it has added some new
pieces, and it continues to be played to the present.

So I really do not see any justification for this kind of statement, which certainly lends itself to being perceived as bigoted.

John Savard
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