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Old March 4th 15, 10:54 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Claiming a draw

In a pro event, I was surprised to see a player summon the arbiter to claim a draw under the 50 move rule. Surely, a better idea is for the claimer to simply offer a draw first, and only involve the arbiter if the offer is declined. That way is both more amicable and more efficient. I can't imagine that anyone would decline a draw in that situation -- pretty easy to check the scoresheet.

Paul
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Old March 4th 15, 11:54 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Claiming a draw

On 04/03/2015 23:54, Paul wrote:
In a pro event, I was surprised to see a player summon the arbiter to
claim a draw under the 50 move rule. Surely, a better idea is for
the claimer to simply offer a draw first, and only involve the
arbiter if the offer is declined. That way is both more amicable and
more efficient. I can't imagine that anyone would decline a draw in
that situation -- pretty easy to check the scoresheet.


It's in fact a tricky situation: if you offer a draw, your opponent can
insist that you play your move before accepting or declining the draw
offer. But once you play your move you can't claim a draw any more. The
correct procedure for a draw claim is to write down the move you intend
to play, stop the clocks and call the arbiter /without/ playing the move.

It has also become an accepted practise to play out forced draws, be it
by stalemate, exchange of all pieces, threefold repetition, or playing
out all the 50 moves. This is a safeguard in tournaments which restrict
draw offers in some way, and it has crept into other tournaments as
well. It has happened even to GMs that they agreed upon a draw,
completely forgetting that special restrictions on draw offers were in
place, and they found themselves forfeited by the arbiter.

Cheers,
Rainer
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Old March 5th 15, 08:26 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Claiming a draw

On Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at 11:54:28 PM UTC, Rainer wrote:
On 04/03/2015 23:54, Paul wrote:
In a pro event, I was surprised to see a player summon the arbiter to
claim a draw under the 50 move rule. Surely, a better idea is for
the claimer to simply offer a draw first, and only involve the
arbiter if the offer is declined. That way is both more amicable and
more efficient. I can't imagine that anyone would decline a draw in
that situation -- pretty easy to check the scoresheet.


It's in fact a tricky situation: if you offer a draw, your opponent can
insist that you play your move before accepting or declining the draw
offer. But once you play your move you can't claim a draw any more. The
correct procedure for a draw claim is to write down the move you intend
to play, stop the clocks and call the arbiter /without/ playing the move.

It has also become an accepted practise to play out forced draws, be it
by stalemate, exchange of all pieces, threefold repetition, or playing
out all the 50 moves. This is a safeguard in tournaments which restrict
draw offers in some way, and it has crept into other tournaments as
well. It has happened even to GMs that they agreed upon a draw,
completely forgetting that special restrictions on draw offers were in
place, and they found themselves forfeited by the arbiter.

Cheers,
Rainer


I agree that if draws are restricted, it's essential to involve the arbiter, but this isn't usually the case. In normal situations where draws are not restricted, I would think best practice would be to offer the draw without moving. Hopefully, the opponent realises that you can claim a draw under the 50 move rule or the repetition rule, and the opponent agrees to a draw.. If the opponent insists that you play a move, then it is necessary to call an arbiter. It's a very basic principle in everyday life. Never involve a third party if you have excellent prospects of obtaining an agreement directly.

Paul
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