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Old September 8th 15, 03:17 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Some odd facts about the Chess Grand Tour

Chessbase has given some interesting facts about the Grand Tour:

Aronian beat every American player and no one else (in Norway he only beat Caruana).
Giri has not lost a game in the Grand Chess Tour.
Anand was the only player not to win a game in Saint Louis.
Aronian's score in Saint Louis would only have been good enough for a tie 2-4 in Norway.
Both Wildcards have finished last, though Jon Ludvig Hammer was only last due to tiebreak.
Nakamura has finished third in both tournaments due to tiebreak: in both he has tied for second.
There were as many 3.Bb5+ Sicilians as Najdorfs in Saint Louis.
The Spanish had two white wins, two draws and three black wins.
The only player to lose with 1.d4 was So, who lost against Aronian and Nakamura.
Carlsen, Nakamura, Grischuk and So all had five decisive games.
Out of the five 2800s in the World, only Nakamura and Carlsen finished in the top half at the Sinquefield.

Out of the melee of rating changes, Nakamura emerges as the #2 player in the World
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Old September 9th 15, 08:59 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Some odd facts about the Chess Grand Tour



Offramp wrote:

Chessbase has given some interesting facts about the Grand Tour:

Aronian beat every American player and no one else (in Norway he only beat Caruana).
Giri has not lost a game in the Grand Chess Tour.
Anand was the only player not to win a game in Saint Louis.
Aronian's score in Saint Louis would only have been good enough for a tie 2-4 in Norway.
Both Wildcards have finished last, though Jon Ludvig Hammer was only last due to tiebreak.
Nakamura has finished third in both tournaments due to tiebreak: in both he has tied for second.
There were as many 3.Bb5+ Sicilians as Najdorfs in Saint Louis.
The Spanish had two white wins, two draws and three black wins.
The only player to lose with 1.d4 was So, who lost against Aronian and Nakamura.
Carlsen, Nakamura, Grischuk and So all had five decisive games.
Out of the five 2800s in the World, only Nakamura and Carlsen finished in the top half at the Sinquefield.

Out of the melee of rating changes, Nakamura emerges as the #2 player in the World


Nakamura is unusual. Against Carlsen he was dead lost and Magnus simply played a lousy move. Give credit to Naka
though for finding the only resource but I always said he reminds me of Bent Larsen or Korchnoi. They go all out
to win but sometimes they overreach. At least with Naka you know your going to get a fight. I wouldn't be
surprised if Naka won the candidates. The strongest nerves win. Courage etc etc. But in a match for the world
title if he gets there against Magnus I'm afraid he would probably get steamrolled. His style just doesn't seem
suited for match play at that level.

EZoto

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Old September 29th 15, 06:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Posts: 64
Default Some odd facts about the Chess Grand Tour

On Thursday, September 10, 2015 at 2:21:25 PM UTC-5, Euclides Zoto wrote:
Offramp wrote:

Chessbase has given some interesting facts about the Grand Tour:

Aronian beat every American player and no one else (in Norway he only beat Caruana).
Giri has not lost a game in the Grand Chess Tour.
Anand was the only player not to win a game in Saint Louis.
Aronian's score in Saint Louis would only have been good enough for a tie 2-4 in Norway.
Both Wildcards have finished last, though Jon Ludvig Hammer was only last due to tiebreak.
Nakamura has finished third in both tournaments due to tiebreak: in both he has tied for second.
There were as many 3.Bb5+ Sicilians as Najdorfs in Saint Louis.
The Spanish had two white wins, two draws and three black wins.
The only player to lose with 1.d4 was So, who lost against Aronian and Nakamura.
Carlsen, Nakamura, Grischuk and So all had five decisive games.
Out of the five 2800s in the World, only Nakamura and Carlsen finished in the top half at the Sinquefield.

Out of the melee of rating changes, Nakamura emerges as the #2 player in the World


Nakamura is unusual. Against Carlsen he was dead lost and Magnus simply played a lousy move. Give credit to Naka
though for finding the only resource but I always said he reminds me of Bent Larsen or Korchnoi. They go all out
to win but sometimes they overreach. At least with Naka you know your going to get a fight. I wouldn't be
surprised if Naka won the candidates. The strongest nerves win. Courage etc etc. But in a match for the world
title if he gets there against Magnus I'm afraid he would probably get steamrolled. His style just doesn't seem
suited for match play at that level.

EZoto


You're right. He does play like Bent Larsen.
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