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Old November 11th 17, 11:23 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Red and Black

So far, my Google-fu is deserting me.

I'm trying to find out when it was that the red and black board was displaced by white and green.

The first I'd heard of that was at the time of the Fischer-Spassky match in 1972.

Looking at Chess Review for 1953, chess sets were offered for tournament play with
white and black squares and a 4" high King. Since the dark squares could be black,
this is before the modern standards were adopted, but already the red and black
board that is still included with children's checker sets (the Checkers Federation
for its matches has adopted basically the same standards as FIDE and the USCF now
to combat eyestrain) was recognized as problematic.

Where would I find the story of how standards for the boards and men in chess
events were established and adopted over the years?

John Savard
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Old November 18th 17, 03:03 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Red and Black

I finally found some relevant information. The book "Win at Checkers", by Millard
Hopper, from 1956, noted that green and buff squares, with white and red pieces,
the current official standard, were the "best combination" for colors of checker
pieces.

This book by Dover was a revised edition of a 1941 book, so I don't know if this
was present in the earlier version as well.

John Savard
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Old November 18th 17, 03:08 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Red and Black

This page

http://www.usacheckers.com/forum/vie...php?f=1&t=2650

has a reference dating back to 1928; again, it's in the field of checkers rather than chess, but I would be surprised if the idea hadn't first surfaced from the game of chess.

John Savard
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Old November 18th 17, 03:29 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Red and Black

And to bracket this, Staunton's Handbook, from 1864 in its second edition, refers
to a chessboard as usually being white and black or red and white.

John Savard
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