Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old July 2nd 03, 12:19 PM
Gunny Bunny
 
Posts: n/a
Default Article - Chess and The Brain

Can someone post the full article from Cognitive Brain Research ?

http://www.psychologytoday.com/htdoc...0522-000001.as
p

Chess: Not All About Logic?

By Jason Williams -- Publication Date: Mar/Apr 2003

Summary: Spatial processing may be the key to a good game. Chess is not
necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par with Einstein.
In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial processing than on
logic and computational skills.

Chess is not necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par
with Einstein. In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial
processing than on logic and computational skills. Researchers at the
University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used functional magnetic resonance
imaging to scan the brains of novice players during a match and found a
flurry of activity in the parietal and occipital lobes, areas not associated
with general intelligence.

"It's not what we were expecting," says Sheng He, Ph.D., an assistant
professor of psychology. The findings, published in Cognitive Brain
Research, have implications beyond castling and checkmate. The activity
observed in the parietal lobe suggests that this area may be capable of
handling complex spatial functions, such as the interaction of memory and
incoming spatial information.

"The parietal lobe may have more functions than we previously suspected,"
says He. And inactivity in another area--the left lateral frontal
lobe--raises questions about the role of general intelligence in high-level
cognition and problem solving.






  #2   Report Post  
Old July 3rd 03, 04:17 AM
Geoff McAuliffe
 
Posts: n/a
Default Article - Chess and The Brain

I have a copy but posting it would probably violate copyright laws and I am
not about to put myself in a position to get sued by a big publishing company.
If you are near a University you can probably get a copy from their science
library. Your local public library might also be able to help.
Actually the findings reported in the paper are not revolutionary, pattern
recognition has long been known to play a large part in chess skill. What the
authors found that is new is the part of the brain that is active during chess
thinking.
Check out Dan Heisman's recent article, "Learning from Dr. de Groot" at
ChessCafe.com. It discusses pattern recognition in chess and how this knowledge
can help a player improve.

Geoff McAuliffe
Piscataway, NJ

Gunny Bunny wrote:

Can someone post the full article from Cognitive Brain Research ?

http://www.psychologytoday.com/htdoc...0522-000001.as
p

Chess: Not All About Logic?

By Jason Williams -- Publication Date: Mar/Apr 2003

Summary: Spatial processing may be the key to a good game. Chess is not
necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par with Einstein.
In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial processing than on
logic and computational skills.

Chess is not necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par
with Einstein. In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial
processing than on logic and computational skills. Researchers at the
University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used functional magnetic resonance
imaging to scan the brains of novice players during a match and found a
flurry of activity in the parietal and occipital lobes, areas not associated
with general intelligence.

"It's not what we were expecting," says Sheng He, Ph.D., an assistant
professor of psychology. The findings, published in Cognitive Brain
Research, have implications beyond castling and checkmate. The activity
observed in the parietal lobe suggests that this area may be capable of
handling complex spatial functions, such as the interaction of memory and
incoming spatial information.

"The parietal lobe may have more functions than we previously suspected,"
says He. And inactivity in another area--the left lateral frontal
lobe--raises questions about the role of general intelligence in high-level
cognition and problem solving.


  #3   Report Post  
Old July 3rd 03, 08:51 PM
Liam Too
 
Posts: n/a
Default Article - Chess and The Brain

"Gunny Bunny" wrote in message ble.rogers.com...
Researchers at the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis used

functional magnetic resonance imaging to scan the brains of novice
players during a match and found a flurry of activity in the
parietal and occipital lobes, areas not associated with general
intelligence.

The brains of novice players are different from the brains of GMs.
Here's the link to the study:

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?art...82809EC588ED9F
  #4   Report Post  
Old July 6th 03, 11:45 PM
Nick
 
Posts: n/a
Default Article - Chess and The Brain

"Gunny Bunny" wrote in message ble.rogers.com...
http://www.psychologytoday.com/htdoc...522-000001.asp

Chess: Not All About Logic?

By Jason Williams -- Publication Date: Mar/Apr 2003

Summary: Spatial processing may be the key to a good game. Chess is not
necessarily a game reserved for people with IQ scores on par with Einstein.
In fact, chess strategy may rely more heavily on spatial processing than on
logic and computational skills.


'Natural talent' in chess tends to be popularly (though rather unfairly)
characterised as being represented by skill at blitz chess, which emphasizes
the instant recognition of spatial patterns and the fluent processing of
tactics, not the logical development of intricate strategic plans.

In my view, chess is primarily an exercise in spatial pattern recognition
with a secondary logical constituent.

--Nick
Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:55 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017