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Old October 20th 04, 02:38 AM
Parrthenon
 
Posts: n/a
Default Where is Liberty?


Joel Benjamin asks a good question. Where is Liberty? And some of us,
given Bush's horrors, wonder where is liberty.

The real issue, however, is where is the cross that four USCF members
have given us to bear. Where is Crossville?

Oh, yes, I know it is in Tennessee. Tennessee may be narrow, but it's
hundreds of miles long.

Where is the cross that chess will have to bear?

Where is the extended Kladiddlehopper family? Where is Ferdie
Kladiddlehopper who will be handling the accounts right soon?

Moving from New York, the center of chess, to Crossville. This
decision consigns the Federation to the dustbin. We have finally succeeded in
hiding ourselves from chess itself.

You don't have to like New Yorkers or a lot of the chess people in New
York to understand that some of those people you really would not enjoy having
dinner with are ... well ... real chess people.

Oh, it's awful. Just awful. Terrible, terrible, terrible.

Why the rush to judgment instead of delaying the vote for two weeks
until the billionaire's gift could be examined more closely?

writes:

Where is Liberty?

one hour west of newburgh

on route 17 going NW from nyc direction Binghamton about a two hour drive

about 25 mile SE of Monticello and Grossingers

__________________________________________________ ______________
"FIDE has made its decision. Players who refuse to be drug tested will not be
able to play chess." -- Dr. Press, co-founder of the FIDE Medical Commission.
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Old October 20th 04, 03:29 AM
Tim Hanke
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Parrthenon" wrote many words, including the
following...

Why the rush to judgment instead of delaying the vote for two weeks
until the billionaire's gift could be examined more closely?


No rush to judgment. USCF Vice President Steve Shutt visited the site and
gave the Board an extremely detailed report. The building, a 104-year-old
former hospital, is quite large, far too large for our needs. According to
Steve's report, it would have needed a lot of work. Even if it had been in
perfect shape, the upkeep could have killed us. Moving there would not have
been a good business decision, in the opinion of the Board majority.

Bill Goichberg had 1,001 reasons why it was a great deal, but I wouldn't
have wanted it as a free gift. Bill wanted AF4C to buy the property, give us
free rent, and eventually sell it to us. There were a lot of questions to be
resolved. And even if all the questions could all have been resolved in the
best possible way, I still think it was a bad fit.

Reasonable people can differ. As I've said before, it might have been an
acceptable interim location for us if there had been no better offers on the
table. I think Crossville, Tennessee and Lindsborg, Kansas were both better
offers. Randy Bauer visited Lindsborg and gave the Board a glowing report. I
think USCF could have done well in Lindsborg. But a majority of the Board
felt Crossville had a prior claim, and should be preferred unless another
location was clearly superior. We didn't think any other location was.

Tim Hanke
USCF Vice President of Finance


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Old October 20th 04, 03:30 AM
ChessforLife
 
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Dear All:

Steve Shutt, USCF Vice-President wrote this excellent report which is rather
lengthy but includes important details and comments on the Liberty, NY
proposal.

I will prepare a report to the USCF Delegates with all the details about the
relocation..

Crossville is a delightful place with good and warm people, since the USCF is
slowly moving into the information business, the actual location of the office
is less relevant than making the organization viable again and investing in the
technology to reach out to our community.

Moving the USCF office to Crossville is a sound and solid decision!

All the best,

Beatriz Marinello
USCF President

Special note for Sam Sloan: Thank you for caring about my health which is
quite good at the moment, my condition has been stabilized I feel better than
ever. Also, I have a health insurance with Aetna. I can assure you that I
will be healthy enough to see the USCF moved into the 21 century.


Analysis of USCF Relocation Proposals for Liberty, New
York and Crossville, TN

Dear Executive Board and Relocation Committee Members:

On Monday, October 10th, I visited Liberty, NY to
inspect a site, which is being considered for the USCF
office. Liberty is a town of about 10,000, which
makes it equivalent to Crossville in size. The towns
share other qualities as well. Both are situated in
attractive, hilly country. Crossville is located on
the Cumberland Plateau between Knoxville and Nashville
in central Tennessee. The elevation ranges between
2000 and 3000 feet. Liberty is located in Sullivan
County about one hour’s drive west of New Windsor.
Although the towns are similar is size, the area
surrounding Liberty appears much more rural than that
around Crossville. I have visited Crossville twice,
traveling more extensively on my first trip. It has a
more suburban feel to it. There are more shopping
centers, restaurants, other businesses, and housing
developments in the areas outside of Crossville. As I
own a piece of property just south of Sullivan County
in Pike County, Pennsylvania, I am familiar with that
part of the country. Personally, I have a fondness for
the more rural countryside in that part of New York
and Pennsylvania. However, employees relocating to our
new facilities might find more amenities and housing
options in the Crossville area. Both are located
about an hour’s drive from the nearest commercial
airport.

Both areas are located in four season climates.
Tennessee can become uncomfortably warm in the summer.
The Cumberland Plateau is an exception. Its higher
elevations moderate summer temperatures. Both
locations would have few days with temperatures in the
90’s. Liberty has even cooler summer temperatures than
Crossville, which is a plus as it saves on
air-conditioning. On the other hand winters in Liberty
would be colder. Crossville receives snow, but it
rarely lasts more than a day or two after a storm.
Central New York in the Catskills can remain snow
covered for a number of days. Both communities have a
very low cost of living factor.

Crossville has been in a steady growth pattern for a
number of years. There is a very active community
involvement from the public and private sectors in
attracting new businesses to the area. It has been
quite successful.

A strong tourist industry supported the Liberty area
economically for many years. The famous Grossingers
was very close by. As the tourist industry died, the
area underwent a local depression. There are signs of
a reemergence economically. The Chapin Estates, a
gated community of million dollar homes, and the
Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, which will be
operational in 2006 are recent additions to the
county. The Sullivan County Partnership for Economic
Redevelopment is very actively seeking to attract new
businesses. Several representatives from this
organization were extremely friendly and cooperative
in showing us the property and answering all of our
questions. They seemed genuinely enthusiastic about
the prospect or our relocating there. They claim the
area will experience a tremendous rate of growth in
the near future and property values will skyrocket.

The property in Liberty comprises 18 acres of
beautiful, forested land and includes a large 3-story
building. The building is set back from the road far
enough to permit a large attractive yard with a number
of tall hardwoods and a semi-circular driveway leading
to the entrance. Towards the left side of the building
is an area sufficiently large enough for parking
needs. The property is located at an elevation of
1800 feet. The backyard extends a short distance to a
line of trees. Beyond that point the property is
heavily forested and slopes steeply downhill providing
an extraordinary view of the Hudson Valley below. The
majority of the 18 acres is on this tree covered
slope. I would not engage in any tree removal on this
part of the property as the steep slope of the land
makes building impossible and the trees offer a sense
of privacy and provide a beautiful setting for the
building. No landscaping would be required at all. A
small area would have to be cleared for a parking lot.
This would be a very minimal expense.

The building itself is a very attractive old 3-story
structure that was built as a tuberculosis sanatorium
in 1901 and later converted into Loomis Hospital
(please don’t hold the name against it) before being
purchased and remodeled into a seminary. The Gerry
Foundation purchased it in the late 1990s and it has
been vacant since then. The building was
reconditioned in the 1950s. Mr. Gerry, a very wealthy
man, owns the adjacent property. Our host for the
Economic Development Partnership told us Mr. Gerry
wants to sell to an organization that would not bring
a lot of traffic and noise to the area. It seems
certain we would have a relatively secluded place
whose surrounding would stay attractive.

The walls up to the top of the first floor are covered
with thick stone that is in very good condition. Some
minor pointing appears to be all that would be needed
here. The second floor is wood framed with a cement
covering similar to stucco. It appears to be several
inches thick. Strips of wood cover the lower part of
the cement surface giving the exterior a Tudor look.
The windows are also framed in wood. This wood is in
very desperate need of painting. It is difficult to
judge its condition. Most of the windows are covered
with storm windows, which would help moderate the
effects of weathering. The third floor is under the
roof line. The windows are located in dormers built
into the roof. The front roof is old slate with many
gaps where pieces have broken away. It would have to
be replaced immediately. The rear roof is asbestos
roofing tiles, which is the traditional roofing
material used in today’s construction. It appears to
be in good condition. I suspect it was added after the
Gerry Foundation purchased the building. Most of the
windows appear to be from the fifties. Although
covered with storm windows, they are also in great
need of painting at the very least. Windows of that
period were not well insulated and the sizes are often
not standard with today’s market. Some of the third
floor windows looked to be original from 1901. I
would replace all of the windows in the building. Two
large fire escapes are attached to either end of the
building. They are rusted and would need work. One
platform has rusted through on one side. Despite some
obvious need for repairs the building appears to be in
very good shape for its age.

The interior looks to be in relatively good shape as
well. There are 14 small rooms on the first floor and
a slightly larger room used as an office. Each of
these rooms has a small closet and a bathroom complete
with toilet, sink, and tub or shower. Remember the
building was designed to house patients in each of
these rooms. The rooms are much too small to be of
any use except perhaps as examining rooms in a medical
clinic. The first floor also includes a much larger
room, which is equal in size to at least 6 to 8 of the
small rooms. This had been used as a library and could
contain a number of desks for office workers. The
walls between the small rooms would have to be torn
down in order to create the larger office rooms we
would need. That should not be difficult. There is
plenty of room on the first floor to create all the
office space we could use. Removing the bathroom
fixtures would be a more extensive job. We certainly
do not need 14 bathrooms. There would be no waiting in
line. The walls are slats covered with plaster as was
the construction style in buildings of this period.
They have not been modernized, thus there is no
insulation in the walls. This along with the older
style windows would make the building expensive to
heat. Thick stone walls lose heat slowly. The interior
will cool gradually, retaining summer warmth into the
early autumn. These buildings also heat up more
gradually in the spring retaining the cool dampness of
the winter into the early spring. This is due to the
thickness rather than the type of building material.
Stone and cement are not good insulators. I recommend
that all of the walls be heavily insulated. The
heating system runs on an oil burner. Hot water
radiators are throughout the house. The boiler has
been added more recently although I do not know
exactly when. The rest of the system is older. With
the exception of a recently remodeled third floor room
the radiators seem to date at least to the fifties and
quite possibly older. We were told the heating system
could be modified into separate systems, with each
wing of each floor independent of the other. I do not
know what the cost of such a modification to this
system would be. There are adequate electrical
outlets in all of the rooms. As the plaster walls are
of an old vintage so would the electrical wiring
behind them. I would suggest replacing the wiring when
insulating the walls.

The second floor contains 19 more small rooms each
with its own bathroom and a larger room about the size
of 3 of the smaller rooms. The walls here are much
thinner being wood framed with a thin covering of
cement. The third floor housed the kitchen of the
seminary. The old cast iron stoves, large sinks, and
walk-in refrigerator are fascinating replicas of an
historic time. None of course would be useful today.
A small dining room sits across the hallway from the
kitchen and two large rooms flank it. Some recent work
by the Gerry Foundation has been done to these rooms.
One of these, a proposed chapel is 60 X 27 feet, has
been partially remodeled. The ceiling has been
insulated and a new ceiling, electric, and modern hot
water heaters installed. The other room is roughly
two thirds the size of the larger room and is
basically unfinished. Insulation has been added to the
ceiling, but it is unheated and nothing else done at
this point. It is interesting that only the third
floor has had any work done recently. I suspect that
the old roof may have leaked causing water damage that
required immediate attention. The floors appear to be
in good shape although there is sagging on the third
floor in the kitchen. The heavy stoves and sinks
might be responsible for it.

There is a small addition attached to the building in
the back at the basement level. It is a cheap
cinderblock addition that is heated by electric
ceiling heaters. With a humidifier this room might be
useful for storage. The cinderblock walls and the
large window area would make it much too cold in the
winter for human habitation. There are some cracks in
its walls. The basement itself resembles the basement
in the building we visited in New Windsor. It would be
a major project involving enormous amounts of manpower
just to clean it out. I do not think it would be worth
the effort. Currently, it is not suitable even for
storage. The lack of use of the basement is not a
detriment to the property. We certainly do not need
it and it was never mentioned as a selling point of
the building. It is best ignored.

It has been proposed that the USCF could lease space
on the second and/or third floor. It was also
proposed that we could run tournaments or rent those
floors to a chess camp if we could not or would not
lease. We would have to make a difficult decision
about the amount of refurbishing we want to do to the
second and third floors. As the walls are not
insulated and much thinner, on the upper floors,
heating would be much more expensive. Would this make
those areas more difficult to rent or lease. If we
invested the amount of money needed to properly
insulate, install thermally efficient windows, etc on
the upper floors, we would be very dependent on
finding renters to pay for this added investment. The
Economic Development Partnership has offered to assist
us in locating renters for the upper floors if we
purchase the property. Although the county is
expected to grow in population in the future, it is
difficult to determine what the current market would
be for renters. It is an old building and the upper
floors would have to be remodeled to meet the needs of
the leaser. There are 18 small bathrooms on the second
floor alone. Unless we discovered a Diarrhea Clinic
with their bowels in an uproar to get into Sullivan
County, we would need to make some big changes to
accommodate another organization. It is possible that
once we began to tear down walls and remove old
structures we might find more repair work than we
anticipated. Old cars and old buildings can present
these problems. If we tied up a significant amount of
capital in renovating or found the demand for rental
properties was still soft, we could be in a difficult
financial situation.

I was interested in the possibility of utilizing the
second and third floors as a chess camp. I have come
to the conclusion that this would not be practical.
Camps operate at small profit margins, especially
chess camps. Sullivan County is known as a camp
center. There is a large supply of camps with which we
would be competing. Most camps have large outdoor
spaces in which many activities can be held. We would
have insufficient non-forested outdoor space to run
camp activities. Chess camps would be the only type of
camp for which we could maintain a competitive
advantage. There are not that many chess camps to
provide more than a few summer weeks of activity. I
estimate the maximum number of counselors and campers
the building could house is about 40. I just don’t
think there is enough of a profit to warrant using the
building in this fashion. There would even be some
modification costs in converting the building to this
use, although they would probably be much less.

The Crossville Proposal includes three acres of land
that have been given to the USCF. We currently have
title to it and can keep title if we agree to relocate
and build there. The bank has assured us we can use
title to the land as a down payment for a mortgage
loan to construct a building. The architect will
develop plans for any size building we desire.
Currently, we are estimating a building about 4000 sq.
ft. The architect has told us to calculate
construction costs at $90 per sq. ft. This gives us a
cost of $360,000. Our Sullivan County host informed
us that construction costs in Liberty were $150 per
sq. ft Crossville is an active, vibrant community.
There is a large population of professionally skilled
retirees living there. The climate, low taxes, and
cheap cost of living make it an attractive place in
which to live. On our first trip to Crossville in the
spring of 2003, a number of USCF employees visited the
region. The majority were quite enthusiastic after
visiting the place. Many, who initially expressed
doubts, were willing to relocate after a visit. One
feature that had a particularly strong influence was
how much more housing one could purchase in Crossville
as opposed to New Windsor. Taxes are much lower in
Tennessee than in New York. The visiting employees
felt that moving to Crossville would be the equivalent
of receiving a large raise. After our first visit to
Crossville when it appeared we about to move there,
Harry Sabine and the business leaders collected 30
resumes from local residents possessing the variety of
skills that we would need. These were residents who
would be interested in working for the USCF. I have
been told that a transition team of USCF employees
could come to Crossville to help train new staff
members and be housed very inexpensively.

We have been offered free office space to use until a
new building could be completed. This equates to
having a year of free rent. All utilities would be
paid. Tennessee also possesses a very large and
active chess community. The scholastic community is
particularly active. The Tennessee State Chess Assoc
is one of the wealthiest state federations in the
country. There is room on the land for a tournament
hall to be built. There is some speculation the
Tennessee State Assoc might be interested in this
idea. We will be holding the 2004 Supernational
Scholastic Chess Championships in Nashville this
April.

In Crossville, the whole community came out to support
the USCFs proposed relocation bid. Business leaders,
local political leaders, and the chess community all
have pledged their support. One of the local chess
enthusiasts also happens to be a wealthy businessman
who owns a state of the art printing company. We saw a
catalog of one hundred pages with high quality glossy
paper that was filled with photographs of exceptional
quality. He can produce this quality at two thirds the
cost we are currently paying for Chess Life. He is
very generous and gave the town of Crossville the land
on which to build its new high school. We were told he
would be very interested in assisting the USCF
financially.

Both Liberty and Crossville have much to offer. Both
are located in small energetic communities. The site
in Liberty is more attractive; however, the land in
Crossville could be used for expansion. Both areas
have rich benefactors. Liberty has the wealthiest in
Mr. Gerry. There was speculation he might be
interested in investing in our organization. Although
rich donors add to the attractiveness of a proposal,
the uncertainty of their commitment relegates them to
a lesser role in the evaluation of the proposals. I
think either location would be a suitable place for
the USCF office to relocate.

Considering all of the factors, however, I think the
benefits of Crossville outweigh those of Liberty. The
large active community support in Crossville, the more
suburban feel of the area around that town, the
uncertainty of the costs and efforts in rehabbing an
old building, and the reliance on the unknown factors
associated with being a landlord are the critical
factors, which support the Crossville bid. One of the
main arguments for Liberty is that we would be buying
a building worth $1 million dollars for $250,000. The
value of the building is only significant if you are
borrowing on it or selling it. If we are using it we
would not be making money on its value. There would be
no net benefit to the profit and loss statement of the
USCF. In fact the higher costs of maintenance and
upkeep and the higher taxes associated with a more
valuable piece of property in a high tax state would
have a deleterious effect on our profit and loss
statement. The benefit of a building worth more money
is realized if one must borrow on its value or sell it
in the future. These possible future benefits may not
be worth the added current financial risks associated
with owning an older building. A new building in
Crossville on the other hand would have a very low
maintenance cost. I do not mean to imply that the
Liberty proposal is a bad offer. If we did not have
the offer from Crossville, I would think Liberty
should be very seriously considered. The potential
value that could be obtained in Liberty might be worth
the risks if we did not have the more dependable
alternative in Crossville.

Finally, there is also a bid from Lindsborg, Kansas,
which will be reported on by Randy Bauer. He is
presently in Lindsborg examining their site. Their
proposal may well have the lowest cost of all to the
Federation. As I have not seen it I have only the
same information sent to the rest of you. Thus, I will
not comment. I ask you to read Randy’s report on
Lindsborg carefully when he emails it to you on
Saturday.

After reading and considering all the proposals, I ask
the members of the Relocation Committee to email each
other and the EB any final thoughts, comments, or
suggestions before Sunday. This will enable the EB
include them in our discussions during our conference
call on Sunday.

Thank you for your patience and forbearance in
digesting this lengthy tome.

Most sincerely yours,

Stephen Shutt
USCF Vice President

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Old October 20th 04, 04:11 AM
Parrthenon
 
Posts: n/a
Default


I rejected and still reject all kinds of wild charges made over the years
against Tim Hanke. He is a fine board member.

Having said that, I don't find Tim's explanation for sending chess to a
locus called Crossville very enlightening.

A truly tremendous decision has been made: Chess is leaving the center
of chess for a town of 11,000 somewhere in Tennessee. It is not enough to say
that "we chose the bid that seemed the most solid business decision, with the
fewest loose ends and fewest unanswered questions." We need more than this
kind of boilerplate.

Stan Booz gave us a description of a building in Liberty, New York,
which was disputed by Bill Goichberg. Mr. Booz says that a billionaire wanted
to unload a pink elephant to avoid the taxes; Goichberg says it ain't a pink
elephant and no taxes were being paid. Who's right?

Why in the name of heaven did the decision have to be made now? Why
wasn't the two-week extension possible?

Here, then, is what has been done:

1. U.S. Chess will be moved from New York, our chess center, to a place
called
Crossville;

2. Nearly every long-term employee and the attendant experience is about to be
lost;

3. Management and office appear slated to be split unless the Chess Life
editor is to take up residence in Crossville, thereby ending nearly all on the
scene interviews and the like in New York. Where will the ED live?;

4. What happens to the Federation library? Will we have an editor producing
the
most visible product of the Federation without the library to consult?

5. The USCF building in Crossville has yet to be constructed.

There is a lot more here.

One actually feels pain over this decision. Let it be explained!

I don't for a moment believe Tim Hanke has any desire to use the USCF to
promote some trivia game he invented. I also don't believe for a moment that he
offers us here a sufficient explanation for why the USCF is
about to move to the Cumberland Valley or to the Cumberland Mountains somewhere
in Tennessee.

On the face of it, the Liberty deal is far more attractive. I am NOT saying
that this deal really is more attractive. I am saying that
detailed explanations are in order when a decision results in chess moving from
the center of chess to a town of 11,000 in the middle of nowhere.

The ramifications here are enormous.

The key ramification is that the Federation will almost certainly leave
Crossville in a few years time when it becomes clear that the
Mississippification of chess is too great a cross to bear.

You heard it here first: if this decision is not overturned, the Federation
will move back to a chess center inside of three years.

My view, I believe, is a fair one. Let the proponents of this deal tell us
precisely why it was better than Liberty. If they cannot do so,
then there must be a movement to overturn this decision.

__________________________________________________ ______________
"FIDE has made its decision. Players who refuse to be drug tested will not be
able to play chess." -- Dr. Press, co-founder of the FIDE Medical Commission.
  #5   Report Post  
Old October 20th 04, 04:48 AM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I have just read the report of Steve Shutt. While it is a very good
report, it misses several important points. One is that it makes no
mention of the fact that if the USCF moves to Crossville, almost all
the old staff will have to be laid off and entirely new staff will
have to be hired. Bill Goichberg reports that only three members of
the current USCF staff is willing to relocate to Crossville. One of
these three is Bill Goichberg himself who Beatriz plans to fire, so a
move to Crossvile will entail an almost entire rebuilding of the
organization from scratch. How will we rebuild without even having an
experienced USCF office manager on the scene?

By contrast, Liberty New York is only 60 miles away from the present
location. 60 miles is comuting distance. It may not be a convenient
commute but it is close enough that almost all of the present
employees have expressed a willingness to continue working in their
present positions after the move.

Another important point is that all Crossville is really offering is
an empty plot of land. The USCF will have to build on that land, and
pay for the construction. Liberty already has an old hospital building
ready for immediate occupancy. It might need a lot of fixing up, but
we can move in right away.

Do you think that building a new building in the remote mountains of
Tennessee is a trivial task?

What follows is a part of the report by Steve Shutt dealing with the
employee situation. As you will see, Shutt claims that the employees
are enthusiastic about a move to Crossville. This is not true,
according to Goichberg.

So far almost every USCF insider has posted something on this point
and so far not one of them has denied that the plan is to fire Bill
Goichberg and replace him with Beatriz and that this is the reason
that the remote location of Crossville has been selected.

Do you think that the 90,000 members of the USCF are going to be happy
about such obvious self-dealing?

Below I am attaching just one paragraph of the lengthy report by Steve
Shutt. As you will see, Shutt claims that the USCF employees are
enthusiastic about the move to Crossville. However, he dates this as
being as of the Spring of 2003. That was one and a half years ago.
Yesterday, almost all if the employees were calling asking about their
severance pay and retirement benefits. Only two so far have said that
they are willing to move to Crossville.

Sam Sloan

On 20 Oct 2004 02:30:51 GMT, (ChessforLife)
wrote:

Analysis of USCF Relocation Proposals for Liberty, New
York and Crossville, TN

Dear Executive Board and Relocation Committee Members:

[snip]

The Crossville Proposal includes three acres of land
that have been given to the USCF. We currently have
title to it and can keep title if we agree to relocate
and build there. The bank has assured us we can use
title to the land as a down payment for a mortgage
loan to construct a building. The architect will
develop plans for any size building we desire.
Currently, we are estimating a building about 4000 sq.
ft. The architect has told us to calculate
construction costs at $90 per sq. ft. This gives us a
cost of $360,000. Our Sullivan County host informed
us that construction costs in Liberty were $150 per
sq. ft Crossville is an active, vibrant community.
There is a large population of professionally skilled
retirees living there. The climate, low taxes, and
cheap cost of living make it an attractive place in
which to live. On our first trip to Crossville in the
spring of 2003, a number of USCF employees visited the
region. The majority were quite enthusiastic after
visiting the place. Many, who initially expressed
doubts, were willing to relocate after a visit. One
feature that had a particularly strong influence was
how much more housing one could purchase in Crossville
as opposed to New Windsor. Taxes are much lower in
Tennessee than in New York. The visiting employees
felt that moving to Crossville would be the equivalent
of receiving a large raise. After our first visit to
Crossville when it appeared we about to move there,
Harry Sabine and the business leaders collected 30
resumes from local residents possessing the variety of
skills that we would need. These were residents who
would be interested in working for the USCF. I have
been told that a transition team of USCF employees
could come to Crossville to help train new staff
members and be housed very inexpensively.


Most sincerely yours,

Stephen Shutt
USCF Vice President




  #6   Report Post  
Old October 20th 04, 05:34 AM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Another point: Steve Shutt says that we can use the free land to get a
mortgage and then we can build an office building on that land. It
will cost $360,000 to build a building with 4,000 square feet of
office space.

However, a mortgage is a loan which will have to be paid back. It is
not free money.

If we ever decide to leave Crossville, we will have to sell the
building. How much will be the resale value be? We can find the answer
in the fact that Crossville has offered us temporary office space in
an ABANDONED OFFICE BUILDING. In short, our new building will be just
about worthless on the resale market.

More than that, 4000 square feet is not enough for the USCF. We had
more than 4000 square feet in the New Windsor Office and crowding was
a severe problem.

By contrast, the building we are being offered in Liberty is four
times bigger than what the USCF needs and is much cheaper.

Obviously, the Liberty deal is much better than the Crossville deal.

Sam Sloan
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