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Old November 19th 04, 06:34 AM
Greg Wren
 
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Default Crossville

The idea of moving the offices of USCF from New York to Tennessee always
struck me as a bit strange. Of course NY is an expensive state to live in.
And if you were in NY, why not NYC which is even more expensive, but the top
of the chart for chess prestige. (After all, very strong players abound.)

Second place, in my view, would be San Francisco. Great chess club, climate,
etc. Third, Florida (?) - there seems to be support by philanthropic
interests - (?) But here, we start to run into the "rural" conception, even
more with Crossville


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Old November 19th 04, 06:53 AM
Mike Nolan
 
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"Greg Wren" writes:

The idea of moving the offices of USCF from New York to Tennessee always
struck me as a bit strange. Of course NY is an expensive state to live in.
And if you were in NY, why not NYC which is even more expensive, but the top
of the chart for chess prestige. (After all, very strong players abound.)


Second place, in my view, would be San Francisco. Great chess club, climate,
etc. Third, Florida (?) - there seems to be support by philanthropic
interests - (?) But here, we start to run into the "rural" conception, even
more with Crossville


Greg, the primary things that the USCF office does is deal with
membership issues (including rating events) and prepare the various
publications.

For those tasks, what advantages are there in being in New York City?

Most of the national events are held in states other than New York,
mostly because it's too expensive to run events in New York.

How many grandmaster does it take to process a USCF membership?
(That may produce some interesting responses.)
--
Mike Nolan
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Old November 19th 04, 07:21 AM
Greg Wren
 
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If all the USCF is is a ratings computer center it could be done anywhere. I
suppose I have a vision of USCF as mo chess promotion (with on-site
stuff), interviews with GM's, etc. Plus, a chess friendly environment that
promotes staff, etc. (people do not work in a vacuum). Chess staff in the
NYC chess environment seems better than in Crossville.

"Mike Nolan" wrote in message
...
"Greg Wren" writes:

The idea of moving the offices of USCF from New York to Tennessee always
struck me as a bit strange. Of course NY is an expensive state to live in.
And if you were in NY, why not NYC which is even more expensive, but the
top
of the chart for chess prestige. (After all, very strong players abound.)


Second place, in my view, would be San Francisco. Great chess club,
climate,
etc. Third, Florida (?) - there seems to be support by philanthropic
interests - (?) But here, we start to run into the "rural" conception,
even
more with Crossville


Greg, the primary things that the USCF office does is deal with
membership issues (including rating events) and prepare the various
publications.

For those tasks, what advantages are there in being in New York City?

Most of the national events are held in states other than New York,
mostly because it's too expensive to run events in New York.

How many grandmaster does it take to process a USCF membership?
(That may produce some interesting responses.)
--
Mike Nolan



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Old November 19th 04, 09:10 AM
Bill Smythe
 
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"Mike Nolan" wrote:
How many grandmaster does it take to process a USCF membership?


Or to change a light bulb?

Bill Smythe



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Old November 19th 04, 11:20 AM
Chess One
 
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"Greg Wren" wrote in message
...
If all the USCF is is a ratings computer center it could be done anywhere.


Yes. The magazine too. The yikes buzz-word is 'tele-commuting'.

However the comments you make are likely to have you condemned as hideous by
breaking a taboo, [asking honest questions], and you may be accused of being
a nutter, like myself and most people who have actually thought about these
issues, and who think it could do with more discussion and general airing.

Read a few more Crossville threads and you'll catch the drift. Phil

I suppose I have a vision of USCF as mo chess promotion (with on-site
stuff), interviews with GM's, etc. Plus, a chess friendly environment that
promotes staff, etc. (people do not work in a vacuum). Chess staff in the
NYC chess environment seems better than in Crossville.

"Mike Nolan" wrote in message
...
"Greg Wren" writes:

The idea of moving the offices of USCF from New York to Tennessee always
struck me as a bit strange. Of course NY is an expensive state to live
in.
And if you were in NY, why not NYC which is even more expensive, but the
top
of the chart for chess prestige. (After all, very strong players abound.)


Second place, in my view, would be San Francisco. Great chess club,
climate,
etc. Third, Florida (?) - there seems to be support by philanthropic
interests - (?) But here, we start to run into the "rural" conception,
even
more with Crossville


Greg, the primary things that the USCF office does is deal with
membership issues (including rating events) and prepare the various
publications.

For those tasks, what advantages are there in being in New York City?

Most of the national events are held in states other than New York,
mostly because it's too expensive to run events in New York.

How many grandmaster does it take to process a USCF membership?
(That may produce some interesting responses.)
--
Mike Nolan







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Old November 19th 04, 12:25 PM
HAASpittle
 
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Chess HQ could operate from almost any location in the US including any
number of small towns. Circumstances unique to chess lead HQ to Crossville.
A while back it was a bit of fun on here to suggest one's favorite places
for Chess HQ. I thought the suggestion favoring Wilmington, DE had some merit,
low cost, near the Philly airport and so on. Likewise, Peachtree City, GA just
down the road from the Atlanta airport. Bradenton, FL just across the Skyway
from the Tampa airport, etc., etc. Any of those would have been fine. But its
Crossville, which good enough.

Old Haasie
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Old November 19th 04, 12:36 PM
HAASpittle
 
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Default

"Chess staff in the NYC chess environment seems better than in Crossville."
(gwren)
============
The next major development for Chess HQ should be the installation of the
Mensa model for chess... with a huge NYC Metro District umbrella to promote
chess in that metro area... along with many other metro district umbrellas
throughout the country.
An ideal national chess federation would borrow much of its organizational
structure from Mensa, including the funding of metro umbrellas from a portion
of the national dues.
We won't have a really good chess national federation until we have one
that looks more like Mensa than the traditional USCF.

Old Haasie
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Old November 19th 04, 01:55 PM
Angelo DePalma
 
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Industries and companies in those industries tend to congregate in certain
geographic locations. Advertising on Madison Avenue; startup biotech
companies in the Boston/Cambridge area; publishers in New York, etc. It
doesn't seem right to headquarter the national chess organization in an area
far from a critical mass of chess organizers, players, administrators. Plus
there's the issue of Goichberg, Thomas, Bisguier, Hanke, and probably 20
other people who now drive to New Windsor who used to drive to N.W. and now
must be flown to Crossville midweek at ungodly fares. Is everyone going to
move to Crossville?

As George W. Bush stated many times during the presidential campaign, "The
move to Crossville...is the wrong move...to the wrong place...at the wrong
time."

Given the fact that we could have a free ride in Liberty for 5 years, the
decision to schlepp everyone 800 miles away is incomprehensible.

Angelo

"Mike Nolan" wrote in message
...
"Greg Wren" writes:

The idea of moving the offices of USCF from New York to Tennessee always
struck me as a bit strange. Of course NY is an expensive state to live in.
And if you were in NY, why not NYC which is even more expensive, but the
top
of the chart for chess prestige. (After all, very strong players abound.)


Second place, in my view, would be San Francisco. Great chess club,
climate,
etc. Third, Florida (?) - there seems to be support by philanthropic
interests - (?) But here, we start to run into the "rural" conception,
even
more with Crossville


Greg, the primary things that the USCF office does is deal with
membership issues (including rating events) and prepare the various
publications.

For those tasks, what advantages are there in being in New York City?

Most of the national events are held in states other than New York,
mostly because it's too expensive to run events in New York.

How many grandmaster does it take to process a USCF membership?
(That may produce some interesting responses.)
--
Mike Nolan



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Old November 19th 04, 02:26 PM
Randy Bauer
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Angelo DePalma says...


Industries and companies in those industries tend to congregate in certain
geographic locations. Advertising on Madison Avenue; startup biotech
companies in the Boston/Cambridge area; publishers in New York, etc. It
doesn't seem right to headquarter the national chess organization in an area
far from a critical mass of chess organizers, players, administrators. Plus
there's the issue of Goichberg, Thomas, Bisguier, Hanke, and probably 20
other people who now drive to New Windsor who used to drive to N.W. and now
must be flown to Crossville midweek at ungodly fares. Is everyone going to
move to Crossville?


True, but I've often wondered what other chess industries have located or are
located in New Windsor? For that matter, other than the Marshall chess club,
NYC? As somebody else noted, NYC has become too expensive for large chess
tournaments (which I can attest to, as staying at the Sheraton Towers in
Manhatten for 3 nights a couple weeks back set me back about a grand).

My fare into Knoxville was about $250, and as I recall Tim Hanke's was under
$200, so I don't think airfare alone is going to be that big a deal. Obviously,
we will seek to have the Executive Director, CFO, etc., located in Crossville.


As George W. Bush stated many times during the presidential campaign, "The
move to Crossville...is the wrong move...to the wrong place...at the wrong
time."

Given the fact that we could have a free ride in Liberty for 5 years, the
decision to schlepp everyone 800 miles away is incomprehensible.


That's a leap. The last bid from Liberty was to sell us the building, not give
it to us.


Angelo


Randy Bauer

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