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Old March 16th 05, 01:36 PM
banana
 
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Default Fischer -> Iceland if citizen - party leader meets Iceland ambassador

Mizuho Fukushima, head of Japan's Social Democratic Party, has said that
immigration officials told her that if Fischer becomes an Icelandic
citizen, Japanese authorities will allow him to leave for Iceland.

She is to meet the Icelandic ambassador tomorrow.

I bet the US goons in Reykjavik (or Keflavik) are annoyed at this.

Fischer is being held illegally of course, but let us hope he gets
Icelandic citizenship as soon as possible.




From 'USA Today':

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2005-03-16-fischer-iceland_x.htm:

***BEGIN ARTICLE***

Some rally against Bobby Fischer's deportation to U.S.

By Eric Talmadge, Associated Press

TOKYO - Chess genius Bobby Fischer, now detained in Japan awaiting
deportation to the United States, would be allowed to leave for Iceland
instead if that country granted him citizenship, an opposition party
leader said Wednesday.

Mizuho Fukushima, head of Japan's Social Democratic Party, said senior
immigration officials told her they could approve such a resolution to
the chess master's eight-month detention at a jail on the outskirts of
Tokyo.

Fischer is wanted by Washington for violating economic sanctions against
the former Yugoslavia when he played a high-profile chess match on a
resort there in 1992.

"They said that if he had citizenship, there would be no problem,"
Fukushima said after the meeting with immigration officials. She was to
meet with the Icelandic ambassador in Tokyo later Wednesday.

Iceland recently issued Fischer a special passport and residence permit
to help resolve the standoff over his status. Fischer became world chess
champion in a 1972 match in Iceland against the Soviet Union's Boris
Spassky, and some of his Icelandic supporters have campaigned to help
him out of gratitude for putting Iceland in the global spotlight.

The Iceland passport is one used by foreigners, however, and Fischer,
62, has not yet received citizenship.

Since being taken into custody in July for allegedly trying to leave the
country on a revoked U.S. passport, Fischer has lived up to his
reputation as unpredictable.

He has repeatedly denounced the U.S. deportation order as politically
motivated, demanded refugee status, unilaterally renounced his U.S.
citizenship and said he wants to become a German national instead. He
has also applied to marry a Japanese woman who heads this country's
chess association and is his longtime companion.

Officials, meanwhile, have taken a hard line with him.

Fischer is being held in detention just outside Tokyo pending the
outcome of a lawsuit challenging the deportation order. Officials say
they do not know how much longer that could take. Though most detainees
at the center are deported or allowed to leave Japan within about one
month, Fischer has been in custody for eight months.

Fukushima said Fischer, an outspoken critic of the U.S. government, was
being treated unfairly.

"There is no need to keep him in detention," she said. "If this were any
other person, I'm sure it would have turned out differently."

Her protest came after a member of Japan's leading opposition party, the
Democrats, grilled government officials in parliament over the case.
Fukushima said her party also intended to pursue the issue further in
parliamentary debate.

***END ARTICLE***

--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)
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Old March 16th 05, 02:10 PM
Liam Too
 
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Mainichi Daily News
By Ryann Connell and Norihiro Tashima, March 16, 2005

Fukushima said that during a meeting with Masaharu Miura, the head of
the Immigration Bureau had offered Fischer the possibility of leaving
Japan instead of being deported to the United States.

"He said if Fischer has Icelandic citizenship, there would be no
problem in him going to Iceland," Fukushima told reporters.

During a Tuesday meeting of the House of Councilors Committee on
Defense and Diplomacy, Miura said Fischer would only be expelled to the
country of his citizenship, which the ministry regards as being the
U.S. even though Fischer says he has renounced American nationality.

The SDP leader told Miura that Fischer should be free to leave for
Reykjavik because he has a special Icelandic foreigner's passport,
residency permit and a ticket to leave the country. He has also
expressed a willingness to leave Japan voluntarily provided he is
allowed to go to Iceland.

"I cannot understand why the Ministry of Justice insists on keeping
Fischer here when Iceland has expressed a willingness to accept him,"
she said.

More on this link:
http://mdn.mainichi.co.jp/news/20050...dm008001c.html

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Old March 16th 05, 02:19 PM
Hans Jørgen Lassen
 
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It is evident what is going on here. Japan is holding on to Fischer until he
has been indicted for tax evasion and God knows what. And then they can
extradite him to the before mentioned God's own country.

Saying that Fischer can go to Iceland, if he receives citizenship there, is
a play for the audience. They know that there is not time enough for Fischer
to get that citizenship before the US claims him.

Japan, the land of utter disgrace. Is the concept of honour dead over there?

HansJ


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Old March 16th 05, 02:56 PM
banana
 
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In article .com, Liam
Too writes

Mainichi Daily News
By Ryann Connell and Norihiro Tashima, March 16, 2005

Fukushima said that during a meeting with Masaharu Miura, the head of
the Immigration Bureau had offered Fischer the possibility of leaving
Japan instead of being deported to the United States.

"He said if Fischer has Icelandic citizenship, there would be no
problem in him going to Iceland," Fukushima told reporters.

During a Tuesday meeting of the House of Councilors Committee on
Defense and Diplomacy, Miura said Fischer would only be expelled to the
country of his citizenship, which the ministry regards as being the
U.S. even though Fischer says he has renounced American nationality.


US authorities say he's American.
Icelandic authorities say he's stateless.
US and Iceland are both foreign countries as far as Japan is concerned.

Japanese authorities are choosing to view him as American.
What reasons have they given?
(Other than 'that's what the US embassy told us, so who gives a ****
what the Icelandic embassy are telling us?').

More on this link:
http://mdn.mainichi.co.jp/news/20050...dm008001c.html


--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)
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Old March 16th 05, 03:06 PM
banana
 
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In article , Hans Jørgen
Lassen writes

It is evident what is going on here. Japan is holding on to Fischer until he
has been indicted for tax evasion and God knows what. And then they can
extradite him to the before mentioned God's own country.

Saying that Fischer can go to Iceland, if he receives citizenship there, is
a play for the audience. They know that there is not time enough for Fischer
to get that citizenship before the US claims him.


I think the Icelandic government has an obligation to defend Icelandic
passport holders abroad even if they are stateless.

Of course, the Japanese government also has an obligation not to help
the US regime persecute someone it says is a US citizen. (Older readers
may remember something called 'the Berlin Wall' and 'defection'. If a
ballet dancer from the Bolshoi defected to the US, the US authorities
didn't declare that their policy was to deport all citizens of the USSR
back to the USSR). The issue is fast arising of 'will the *Icelandic*
government stand up to the US government on this matter?'

What's happening is buck passing... Ministry of Justice...immigration
officials...'nothing to do with us, ask Iceland'...and so far, no
officials have had the guts to say 'this person is being persecuted by
the US regime and deserves protection as a stateless refugee'.

--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)


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Old March 16th 05, 03:18 PM
Ray Gordon
 
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Pay $3 mil in back taxes and he's free.

Ray Gordo, Piece of ****

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forum.

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Old March 16th 05, 04:27 PM
Mike Murray
 
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On 16 Mar 2005 07:18:23 -0800, "Ray Gordon"
wrote:

Pay $3 mil in back taxes and he's free.


With penalties and interest, it's currently over $6 million. But they
*do* allow negotiation. Fischer should consult Willie Nelson. Or
channel Joe Lewis.
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Old March 16th 05, 04:36 PM
Mike Murray
 
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On Wed, 16 Mar 2005 08:27:59 -0800, Mike Murray
wrote:

On 16 Mar 2005 07:18:23 -0800, "Ray Gordon"
wrote:

Pay $3 mil in back taxes and he's free.


With penalties and interest, it's currently over $6 million. But they
*do* allow negotiation. Fischer should consult Willie Nelson. Or
channel Joe Lewis.


Correction "Joe Louis". Meant boxing, not karate.
  #9   Report Post  
Old March 16th 05, 04:55 PM
Hans Jørgen Lassen
 
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"banana" wrote:

I think the Icelandic government has an obligation to defend Icelandic
passport holders abroad even if they are stateless.


What I deeply appreciate is that a whole bunch of brave Icelanders stood up
for Fischer with no legal obligation whatever to do so. They just thought
that was the right thing to do, and then they did what a man (or woman) has
to do. The Japanese authorities do not compare favourably to those
warmhearted, straight and unbending people.

Older readers
may remember something called 'the Berlin Wall' and 'defection'.


Well, I dont just remember, I was there, on the wrong side of the wall, but
as a Dane free to go where ever I wanted. It was frightening at night in
Berlin to experience the patrols with their barking dogs, the searchlights
and so on.
Give me back the Berlin Wall - rather that than having the US adopt
standards that belonged behind that wall. Not exactly historically true,
these standards or lack of have existed for a long time in the US, but it
seems they are worsening.
Now I come to think of it Eastern Germany maybe was not such a bad place
after all.

And the problem now is: where can one defect to these days? Nowhere. And
certainly not to Japan.

In the good old days at least it was possible to defect. Korchnoi did, and
many others. You cant do that any longer.

So: Give me back the Berlin Wall.

HansJ


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Old March 16th 05, 07:01 PM
banana
 
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In article , Hans Jørgen
Lassen writes

"banana" wrote:

I think the Icelandic government has an obligation to defend Icelandic
passport holders abroad even if they are stateless.


What I deeply appreciate is that a whole bunch of brave Icelanders stood up
for Fischer with no legal obligation whatever to do so. They just thought
that was the right thing to do, and then they did what a man (or woman) has
to do. The Japanese authorities do not compare favourably to those
warmhearted, straight and unbending people.


I think a crunch point may be approaching, when the Icelandic
authorities will have to decide whether or not they want to disobey
explicit American orders (doubtless combined with both carrot and
stick).

This is why I keep mentioning that the Icelandic authorities have
recognised Fischer's stateless status. That in itself is a step in
defiance of the US authorities. If they have taken that step, then they
can take another too, and let's hope they do. My guess would be that
they would give him citizenship right away if they could be reliably
assured that he would keep his mouth shut - but I strongly doubt that he
would agree to be gagged. Which makes the choice for the Icelandic
authorities even starker.

--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)
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