Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 11:19 AM
banana
 
Posts: n/a
Default News reports on what is hopefully Fischer's impending release

[Mistakes in these articles:

1) Fischer did not defend the title against Karpov
2) his 1992 match against Spassky was played in Belgrade as well as
Sveti Stefan
3) it was not an 'exhibition rematch'
4) it was not played in violation of US sanctions, because Fischer was
not subject to US law when he was in Yugoslavia
5) the 1972 match was not a 'Cold War showdown'; it came in the middle
of the period of US-'Soviet' relations known as 'detente'

-banana]




From the 'Guardian':

http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-4883456,00.html:


***BEGIN ARTICLE 1***

Supporters Say Fischer Could Be Free Soon

Tuesday March 22, 2005 10:31 AM


By ERIC TALMADGE

Associated Press writer

TOKYO (AP) - After nearly nine months in a Japanese detention cell,
American chess legend Bobby Fischer appears to have cleared the final
hurdle on his way to freedom.

Iceland's parliament voted Monday to give Fischer citizenship as he
fights an order to deport him from Japan to the United States.

Masako Suzuki, one of Fischer's lawyers, said she expected Fischer would
be released within the week. ``Unless something very unexpected happens,
that would be the natural course of events,'' she said.

Bolstered by the news, supporters visited Fischer at the immigration
detention center on the outskirts of Tokyo. Miyoko Watai, his longtime
companion, said Fischer was ``very happy'' after hearing the news.

Fischer, 62, has been in Japanese custody since his arrest at the Tokyo
airport in July. He is wanted in the U.S. for violating sanctions
against the former Yugoslavia by playing a chess match there.

Fischer has said he wants to renounce his U.S. citizenship. He has
demanded political refugee status in Japan and said he intends to marry
Watai, who heads Japan's chess federation.

Japanese Justice Minister Chieko Nono said Icelandic citizenship would
make it ``legally possible'' for Japan to deport Fischer to that
country.

``We will consider (the possibility) and make an appropriate decision,''
she said on TV Tokyo.

The process still required a formal presidential signature, which was
expected later Tuesday, Suzuki said.

``It is clear that there is no need to detain him anymore,'' she said.
``He wants to leave Japan immediately.''

A few years after Fischer's victory in Iceland, he defended the title
against another Soviet, Anatoly Karpov. He then fell into obscurity
before resurfacing to play an exhibition rematch against Spassky in the
former Yugoslavia in 1992.

Fischer won the rematch on the resort island of Sveti Stefan. But the
match was played in violation of U.S. sanctions imposed to punish then-
President Slobodan Milosevic. If convicted, Fischer could face 10 years
in prison and a fine of $250,000.

A federal grand jury in Washington is also investigating possible money-
laundering charges involving Fischer, Richard J. Vattuone, one of his
lawyers, said this month.

Fischer was reported to have received $3.5 million from the Spassky
rematch. He boasted at the time that he didn't intend to pay any income
tax on the winnings.

It wasn't immediately clear if going to Iceland would help Fischer avoid
extradition to the United States if he is charged. The two countries
have an extradition treaty.

``If the United States wants to charge Bobby with something now, 13
years after the event, they are welcome to do so,'' John Bosnitch, head
of the Free Bobby Fischer Committee, told reporters at a news
conference.

***END ARTICLE 1***



From the 'Times':

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1536759,00.html

and

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,3-1536759_2,00.html:

***BEGIN ARTICLE 2***

March 22, 2005

Bobby Fischer granted Icelandic citizenship

By Jenny Booth, Times Online

Bobby Fischer

After nearly nine months in a Japanese prison cell, the former chess
world champion Bobby Fischer appeared today to be on the verge of
freedom - but Japan’s government wasn’t immediately conceding defeat.

In a major breakthrough for Mr Fischer, who is being held for allegedly
travelling on a revoked US passport, Iceland’s Parliament last night
granted Mr Fischer full Icelandic citizenship, opening the way for him
to leave Japan for that country.

Masako Suzuki, one of his lawyers, said that she expected he would be
released within the week. "Unless something very unexpected happens,
that would be the natural course of events," she said.

Iceland is where Mr Fischer won the world championship in 1972,
defeating Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union in a classic Cold War
showdown that propelled him to international stardom.

Bolstered by the news, supporters visited him at the immigration
detention center where he remains in custody on the outskirts of Tokyo.

Miyoko Watai, his long-time companion, said he was "very happy" after
hearing the news.

Chieko Nono, the Japanese Justice Minister, told reporters that if Mr
Fischer has been granted Icelandic citizenship, it would be "legally
possible to deport him to that country".

"We will consider (the possibility) and make an appropriate decision,"
she said on TV Tokyo.

Since his arrest in July at Tokyo’s Narita airport, Fischer has been
fighting an order that he be deported to the United States, where he is
wanted for violating international sanctions against the former
Yugoslavia by playing a high-profile, and lucrative, exhibition match
there.

The 62-year-old eccentric says he wants to unilaterally renounce his US
citizenship, and has asked for political refugee status and announced
that he intends to marry Watai, who heads Japan’s chess federation.

None of the moves swayed Japanese officials, however, who took an
increasingly hard-line position with him.

His prospects of freedom took a turn for the better this month, when a
delegation of Icelandic supporters visited him and pushed officials to
allow his release. Iceland’s government granted him a special passport,
and, when Tokyo indicated that wasn’t enough, yesterday Icelandic MPs
granted him full citizenship.

The process still required a formal presidential signature, which was
expected later today, said Ms Suzuki.

"It is clear that there is no need to detain him anymore," she said. "He
wants to leave Japan immediately."

Fischer became an icon when he dethroned Spassky in a series of games in
Reykjavik to claim America’s first world chess championship in more than
a century.

But a few years later he refused to defend the title against another
Soviet, Anatoly Karpov. He then fell into obscurity before resurfacing
to play an exhibition rematch against Spassky in the former Yugoslavia
in 1992.

Fischer won the rematch on the resort island of Sveti Stefan. But the
match was played in violation of US sanctions imposed to punish then-
President Slobodan Milosevic. If convicted, he could face 10 years in an
American prison and a fine of $250,000.

A federal grand jury in Washington is also investigating possible money-
laundering charges involving Fischer, one of his lawyers said this
month.

He was reported to have received US$3.5 million from the Spassky
rematch. He boasted at the time that he didn’t intend to pay any income
tax on the winnings.

It wasn’t immediately clear if going to Iceland would help Fischer avoid
extradition to the United States if he is charged. The two countries
have an extradition treaty.

"If the United States wants to charge Bobby with something now, 13 years
after the event, they are welcome to do so," John Bosnitch, head of the
Free Bobby Fischer Committee, told reporters at a news conference.

Though a recluse over the past decade, Fischer has emerged from silence
in radio broadcasts and on his Web page to express anti-Semitic views
and rail against the United States.

His supporters say he is being hounded because of his strongly anti-US
government views.

"As he did when he won the world chess championship in 1972, Bobby has
shown that individual freedom will always win," Mr Bosnitch said.

***END ARTICLE 2***

--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)
  #2   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 11:49 AM
Hans Jrgen Lassen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"banana" wrote:

[Mistakes in these articles:

1) Fischer did not defend the title against Karpov
2) his 1992 match against Spassky was played in Belgrade as well as
Sveti Stefan
3) it was not an 'exhibition rematch'
4) it was not played in violation of US sanctions, because Fischer was
not subject to US law when he was in Yugoslavia
5) the 1972 match was not a 'Cold War showdown'; it came in the middle
of the period of US-'Soviet' relations known as 'detente'


The same blunders and one or two more, revealing a total absence of
knowledge, insight and information, occurred in an article in a Danish
newspaper today. I wrote them to correct the most important ones. Nine
months ago I had to undertake a similar action.

Dont trust the press.

HansJ


  #3   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 01:47 PM
Douglas L Stewart
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I think people ask too much these days. Reporters have to churn
articles every day about various topics that they are only passingly
familiar with.

Given the whole Jason Blair scandal with the New York Times if they get
a bunch of information from someone and don't give them a byline then
they get fired. So basically they're stuck in a position where they
have no choice but to go it along writing about an unfamiliar topic.
Mistakes will happen.

-Douglas

Hans Jrgen Lassen wrote:

The same blunders and one or two more, revealing a total absence of
knowledge, insight and information, occurred in an article in a Danish
newspaper today. I wrote them to correct the most important ones. Nine
months ago I had to undertake a similar action.

Dont trust the press.

HansJ

  #4   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 01:59 PM
banana
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Douglas L Stewart
writes

I think people ask too much these days. Reporters have to churn
articles every day about various topics that they are only passingly
familiar with.


Given the whole Jason Blair scandal with the New York Times if they get
a bunch of information from someone and don't give them a byline then
they get fired. So basically they're stuck in a position where they
have no choice but to go it along writing about an unfamiliar topic.
Mistakes will happen.


It's not like running out of petrol or coming out of the toilets with
your dress caught in your knickers. That 'happens' sometimes. In the
newspapers there are several mistakes in almost every article, obvious
to anyone who knows anything about the subject.

Hans Jrgen Lassen wrote:

The same blunders and one or two more, revealing a total absence of
knowledge, insight and information, occurred in an article in a Danish
newspaper today. I wrote them to correct the most important ones. Nine
months ago I had to undertake a similar action.

Dont trust the press.

HansJ


--
banana "The thing I hate about you, Rowntree, is the way you
give Coca-Cola to your scum, and your best teddy-bear to
Oxfam, and expect us to lick your frigid fingers for the
rest of your frigid life." (Mick Travis, 'If...', 1968)
  #5   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 02:16 PM
Mike Murray
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 13:59:49 +0000, banana
wrote:

It's not like running out of petrol or coming out of the toilets with
your dress caught in your knickers. That 'happens' sometimes. In the
newspapers there are several mistakes in almost every article, obvious
to anyone who knows anything about the subject.


I agree with this. I've a number of niche hobbies and interests, and
on the relatively rare occasions when they get mentioned in the
papers, you wonder how they could pack so many errors into so column
inches.

Some of the longer articles, in areas covered regularly by
specialists, seem to be better (or, maybe, because they don't address
one of my niche interests, I don't recognize the errors).



  #6   Report Post  
Old March 22nd 05, 07:36 PM
Eustace
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Yahoo! News
Entertainment - AFP

AFP
Japan holds out possibility of sending Bobby Fischer to Iceland

Tue Mar 22, 3:28 AM ET

TOKYO (AFP) - Japan said it may let detained chess legend Bobby Fischer
leave for Iceland, which offered the maverick genius citizenship to
prevent his deportation to the United States where he faces prison.

"I have received a report that according to the immigration control law,
it is legally possible to send him there as long as he obtains Iceland
citizenship," Justice Minister Chieko Noono told reporters.

"I think immigration authorities will consider the case appropriately,"
she said without elaborating.

Fischer, 62, was on Monday made a citizen by the parliament of Iceland,
where he is famous for a 1972 match. The American dethroned Boris
Spassky, then a Soviet citizen, in the capital Reykjavik at the height
of the Cold War.

Fischer, known for his eccentric behavior and outspoken criticism of his
country, played a rematch against Spassky in 1992 in Yugoslavia in
defiance of US sanctions imposed over the Balkan wars.

He faces 10 years in prison over the chess game if he returns to the
United States.

Fischer has been in detention since July when he tried to fly out of
Tokyo to the Philippines on his revoked US passport.

All 40 members of Iceland's parliament who cast their votes were in
favor of making Fischer a citizen, while two deputies abstained and 21
were absent.

"When I briefed Mr. Fischer about the legislation over the phone this
morning, he told me, 'Oh good,'" Masako Suzuki, the chess giant's main
lawyer, told AFP.

"'Anyway, getting the majority is important,'" Fischer was quoted by the
lawyer as saying.

"Now, I am going to ask the Iceland embassy to issue a passport as an
Icelandic citizen for him," Suzuki said.

Fischer had previously looked set to be sent to the United States.

Iceland had earlier sent Fischer a passport which showed residency
status but not full nationality, a document not deemed sufficient to
save him from deportation.

Fischer's supporters say the erstwhile American hero has been singled
out for his political views.

Fischer went on Filipino radio on September 11, 2001 to hail the
"wonderful news" of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington and
to launch an anti-Jewish tirade.

Iceland's decision rejoiced Fischer's supporters so much that they put
his name plate on the table at an afternoon press conference in Tokyo
hoping the chess legend would be able to attend it.

"Finally we got citizenship for Bobby," his Japanese fiancee Miyoko
Watai told the news conference after meeting him Tuesday morning at the
Ushiku immigration lock-up northeast of the capital.

Fischer's supporters say he has lost weight and become ragged in
detention, growing a long beard. He was placed into solitary confinement
for four days earlier this month in a tussle with guards over an egg.

"He lost so much weight and he became aged very fast," his fiancee said
in English. "I think you will be surprised if you see him."

Watai, who heads the Japan Chess Association, became engaged to Fischer
after his detention.

She said she planned to move with Fischer to Iceland once he is released.

"We will later consider if our marriage procedures will resume in
Iceland as the procedures have been suspended," she said.

Japanese authorities have not accepted their marriage request, as the
groom was in custody at the time of application.
  #7   Report Post  
Old March 24th 05, 06:18 PM
Gunsberg
 
Posts: n/a
Default


banana wrote:
[Mistakes in these articles:

1) Fischer did not defend the title against Karpov
2) his 1992 match against Spassky was played in Belgrade as well as
Sveti Stefan
3) it was not an 'exhibition rematch'
4) it was not played in violation of US sanctions, because Fischer

was
not subject to US law when he was in Yugoslavia
5) the 1972 match was not a 'Cold War showdown'; it came in the

middle
of the period of US-'Soviet' relations known as 'detente'

-banana]




From the 'Guardian':


http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-4883456,00.html:


It wasn't immediately clear if going to Iceland would help Fischer

avoid
extradition to the United States if he is charged. The two countries
have an extradition treaty.

"If the United States wants to charge Bobby with something now, 13

years
after the event, they are welcome to do so," John Bosnitch, head of

the
Free Bobby Fischer Committee, told reporters at a news conference.

Though a recluse over the past decade, Fischer has emerged from

silence
in radio broadcasts and on his Web page to express anti-Semitic views
and rail against the United States.



Chessbase.com has posted a link to Iceland's Laws and Regulations
pertaining to extradition. If Fischer does stay in Iceland (and is not
forceably removed from the island by US agents), it seems quite remote
that the US will succeed in getting Iceland to turn him over to US
custody.

http://eng.domsmalaraduneyti.is/laws...lations/nr/104

Just having given the regulations a cursory glance, it seems
problematic for the Icelandic authorities to extradite Fischer, based
on the following Articles:

-- Article 2
Icelandic citizens may not be extradited.

--Article 3
A person may only be extradited if the offence involved, or a
comparable offence, could be punishable by more than one year's
imprisonment under Icelandic law.

[I doubt that Fischer's participation in the Chess Match, or
violation of the UN sanctions, would qualify as an imprisonable offense
in Iceland]
..=2E..........
If there is reason to believe that the suspicion concerning criminal
conduct, or the conclusion of a judgement under which extradition is
requested, does not meet the basic principles of Icelandic law
concerning reasonable suspicion of criminal conduct or legally
acceptable proof of guilt in criminal cases, then extradition shall not
be permitted.

[There probably is indeed such reason to hold the belief that the US
belief in suspicion of Fischer's conduct does not adhere to Icelandic
Law]

-- Article 5
Extradition in connection with political offences shall not be
permitted.
If the offence also constitutes a violation of legal provisions of a
non-political nature, extradition shall be permitted if the act is
considered as being political to a small degree.

[ A very strong argument can be made that the US desire to prosecute
Fischer is motivated by political considerations]


--Article 6
No person may be extradited if there is an appreciable risk that after
being extradited, he will be subjected to injustice or persecution
which is directed against his life or freedom, or is otherwise of a
serious nature, on account of his race, nationality, belief, political
opinions or for other political reasons.

[His comments of 9/12/2001, which expressed his {rather repulsive}
political opinions, could certainly prejudice the proceedings, leading
to injustice.]

[I should add that IF Fischer were to go back to the US to face
trial, I believe that there is a liklihood that he would win the case.
A good lawyer--even a competant lawyer--would shred the prosecution's
case. Moreover, Fischer would have the Bully pulpit that he always
wanted. Fischer is so clearly afflicted with mental illness, that it
would be easy to portray the case as an instance of the government
hounding a sick man, who never has physically or materially harmed
anybody.]


--Article 7
In special cases, applications for extradition may be refused if
humanitarian considerations, such as age, health or other personal
circumstances, argue against it.

[The Icelandic governement has already brought up Humanitarian grounds
as a basis for its actions in granting citizenship]


http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/...s/11219735.htm

Iceland's ambassador to Japan, Thordur Oskarsson, said before
Fischer's release that Washington sent a "message of disappointment" to
the Icelandic government over giving Fischer citizenship.

"Despite the message, the decision was put through Parliament on
humanitarian grounds," Oskarsson said.



This is an official translation of the regulation. The original
Icelandic text published in the Law Gazette is the authoritative text.
Laws and Regulations
Extradition of Criminals and Other Assistance in Criminal Proceedings
Act No. 13, 17th April 1984
Translated from the Icelandic


Extradition of Criminals
and Other Assistance in Criminal Proceedings Ac
tNo. 13, 17th April 1984

Chapter 1
Conditions for Extradition
Article 1
A person who is suspected of, indicted for, or has been sentenced for a
criminal offence in a foreign state may be extradited under this Act.


Article 2
Icelandic citizens may not be extradited.


Article 3
A person may only be extradited if the offence involved, or a
comparable offence, could be punishable by more than one year's
imprisonment under Icelandic law. Agreements may be made with other
states concerning extradition for offences which may be punishable by
shorter periods of imprisonment or punitive custody under Icelandic
law.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case shall only
be permitted if it has been decided in the foreign state that the
person whose extradition is requested is to be arrested or imprisoned
for the offence in question.
Unless other arrangements are made in an agreement with the state
involved, extradition for the enforcement of a judgement shall be
permitted only:

1=2E if the punishment specified in the judgement consists of at least 4
months' imprisonment or punitive custody,
2=2E if, according to the judgement or a decision taken in accordance
with an authorization in the judgement, the person sentenced is to be
placed in an institution, and the period he is to spend there may be at
least 4 months.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case or the
execution of punishment for additional offences may be permitted even
though the conditions under paragraphs 1-3 are met only in connection
with one offence.
If there is reason to believe that the suspicion concerning criminal
conduct, or the conclusion of a judgement under which extradition is
requested, does not meet the basic principles of Icelandic law
concerning reasonable suspicion of criminal conduct or legally
acceptable proof of guilt in criminal cases, then extradition shall not
be permitted.


Article 4
Extradition in connection with violations of martial law shall not be
permitted.


Article 5
Extradition in connection with political offences shall not be
permitted.
If the offence also constitutes a violation of legal provisions of a
non-political nature, extradition shall be permitted if the act is
considered as being political to a small degree.




Article 6
No person may be extradited if there is an appreciable risk that after
being extradited, he will be subjected to injustice or persecution
which is directed against his life or freedom, or is otherwise of a
serious nature, on account of his race, nationality, belief, political
opinions or for other political reasons.


Article 7
In special cases, applications for extradition may be refused if
humanitarian considerations, such as age, health or other personal
circumstances, argue against it.


Article 8
Extradition shall not be permitted when the person whose extradition is
requested has been convicted or acquitted in Iceland of the criminal
offence in question.
If an investigation concerning an accused person does not result in his
being indicted, he may not be extradited for the offence which was the
subject of the investigation unless the conditions of the Code Act No.
19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure for the institution of
proceedings are fulfilled.


Article 9
Extradition shall not be permitted if criminal liability, or the
punishment according to sentence, has expired or become invalid in some
other way under Icelandic law.


Article 10
When the person whose extradition is requested has been sentenced to
imprisonment or punitive custody, or, in accordance with a judgement or
under the authorization of a judgement, is to be placed, or has been
placed, in an institution for an offence other than that covered by the
application for extradition, he may not be extradited until he has
served the term of imprisonment or punitive custody or been discharged
from the institution. No person may be extradited if proceedings are in
progress in Iceland for an offence other than the one covered by the
application for extradition, and to which a punishment of at least 2
years' imprisonment or punitive custody may apply, or if the person is
in custody or has been released on bail according to provisions
established under the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal
Procedure.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case may,
however, be permitted on condition that the person involved will be
sent back to Iceland as soon as possible after the conclusion of the
case.

Article 11
The following conditions shall be set for extradition:

1=2E That the person extradited will not be made to face legal
proceedings, or undergo punishment, or be extradited to a third state,
for another criminal offence committed before he was extradited unless:
a=2E the Ministry of Justice so permits (cf. Article 20), or
b=2E the person extradited has not left the country to which he was
extradited, even though he has had the opportunity of leaving it
without hindrance for at least 45 days, or
c=2E he has returned to the country to which he was extradited after
leaving it.
2=2E That the case involving the person extradited may not be conducted
by a temporary court or a court which is authorized only to deal with
the offence involved, or with particular exceptional cases, without the
permission of the Ministry of Justice.
3=2E That the death penalty may not be inflicted on the person
extradited.

Further conditions for extradition may be set.

Chapter II.
Procedure in Extradition Cases.
Article 12
Applications for extradition shall be made through diplomatic channels
unless other arrangements have been agreed with the state involved.
An application for extradition shall contain information about the
nationality of the person whose extradition is requested, his address
(if known) in Iceland, the nature of the offence and where and when it
was committed. If there exists a description of the person whose
extradition is requested, this shall be included. Furthermore,
applications for extradition shall be accompanied by a copy of the
legal provisions of which the offence is considered to be a violation.
If there are substantial obstacles to providing a copy, then it may be
regarded as sufficient to give an account of the legal provisions which
are believed to have been violated.
An application for extradition in connection with the investigation of
a case shall be accompanied by an original, or a certified photocopy,
of an arrest warrant or other decision regarding arrest which, under
the agreed arrangements, is in accordance with the legislation of the
state involved and presents arguments in support of the view that there
are valid reasons for suspecting the person concerned of having
committed a criminal offence.
Applications for the extradition of a person in connection with the
enforcement of a judgement shall be accompanied by the judgement or a
certified transcript thereof.


Article 13
If, on the grounds of the extradition application and the information
submitted with it, the Ministry of Justice considers that the
application should be rejected immediately, this shall be done.
If an application is not rejected immediately under paragraph 1, the
Ministry of Justice shall send the application to the Director of
Public Prosecutions, who shall be obliged to ensure that the necessary
investigation is carried out immediately.
Unless other provisions are made in this Act, the provisions of the
Code of Criminal Procedure shall be applied, as appropriate, to
investigations and other matters concerning extradition applications.


Article 14
The person whose extradition is requested may demand the ruling of the
Reykjav=EDk District Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. as to whether
the legal conditions for extradition have been met. In addition to
informing the person of the extradition application and the arguments
presented in support of it, the Director of Public Prosecutions shall
inform him of this authorization and of the fact that he has the
opportunity of having a legal advisor appointed under Article 16.
A demand for a ruling shall be submitted to the Director of Public
Prosecutions or the Ministry of Justice not later than 24 hours after
the person whose extradition is requested has been informed that the
Ministry of Justice has decided to grant the extradition request. If
there are special reasons, the Ministry of Justice may permit a
decision regarding extradition to be referred to a court even though
the deadline stated above has passed.
If an order is demanded within the legally prescribed period, or if an
exemption from the deadline has been granted, then extradition shall
not take place until a final court ruling has been delivered.

Article 15
In the course of an investigation in connection with an extradition
application, the coercive measures permitted under the Code of Criminal
Procedure in the investigation of comparable criminal cases may be
applied. Decisions on whether the conditions exist for applying
coercive measures may be based on the court decisions accompanying the
applications without further investigation of the demonstration of the
guilt of the person concerned.
The coercive measures mentioned above may be applied until it has been
established whether extradition is to take place, and, if it is
permitted, until it takes place. If a ruling is delivered authorizing
remand custody, it shall not be for a period of longer than 3 weeks. If
it is considered necessary to extend the custody period, this shall be
done by a ruling delivered by a court in which the person remanded in
custody is present. The custody period may not be extended by more than
2 weeks at a time.


Article 16
A judge shall appoint a legal advisor for the person whose extradition
is requested if the person or the Director of Public Prosecutions so
requests. A judge may also appoint a legal advisor on his own
initiative if he considers there is reason to do so.
The wages of the legal advisor and other legal costs shall be paid by
the Treasury. Under special circumstances, however, a judge may decide
that the person concerned shall pay the costs.


Article 17
As soon as the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send all evidence in the case to the Ministry of
Justice, together with a report on the case. The ministry shall then
take a decision on whether to authorize extradition.


Article 18
When the Ministry of Justice has decided to grant an extradition
application, extradition shall proceed as quickly as possible. If the
person whose extradition is requested is not in detention, he may be
arrested and remanded in custody until he is handed over, or his
freedom may be curtailed in other ways according to the provisions of
the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure.
A ruling on coercive measures shall not, however, be valid for more
than 30 days after a final decision on extradition has been taken.
However, a criminal court may decide, under particular circumstances
and at the request of the Ministry of Justice, that coercive measures
are to be applied for a specific further period.
When a person is extradited, it may be decided that items or valuables
which have been confiscated in connection with the case shall be made
over to the authority which requested the extradition, providing that
when such items are made over, provisos are stated, if there is
considered to be reason for doing so, in order to protect the rights of
third parties.


Chapter III.
Other Decisions in Connection with Extradition.
Article 19
If a person is sought by the authorities in a foreign state because he
is suspected of, has been indicted for, or has been convicted of, a
criminal offence which may constitute the basis for extradition under
this Act, the coercive measures prescribed in the Code of Criminal
Procedure may be applied to him in the same way as if he were accused
of the corresponding offence in Iceland. The same measures may be
applied if the relevant authorities announce that they intend to demand
the extradition of the person for the offence.
The Ministry of Justice shall be informed immediately of a decision on
coercive measures. The ministry may decide that coercive measures may
not be taken if it considers that no grounds for extradition exist. If
the ministry does not decide that coercive measures are to be
discontinued, it shall take steps to have the foreign state notified of
them, and to have them discontinued if an application for extradition
is not submitted at the first opportunity. If no extradition
application has been received within 30 days of the sending of the
notification, the coercive measures shall be discontinued. In special
circumstances, this period may be extended.


Article 20
In response to a request, the Ministry of Justice may authorize the
institution of legal proceedings against a person who has been
extradited under this Act, or give its consent for him to undergo
punishment for a criminal offence other than the one for which he was
extradited, and which was committed before the extradition. The same
shall apply regarding consent to have him extradited to a third state
in connection with a criminal offence committed before he was
extradited from Iceland.
Consent may only be granted if the person could have been extradited
under this Act for the offence. The provisions of Articles 14 and 16
shall also apply, as appropriate, to the granting of such consent.
Consent for the further extradition of the person to Denmark, Finland,
Norway or Sweden may, however, be granted if the conditions of the Act
No. 7/1962 for extradition to those countries apply.
Requests for consent under paragraph 1 shall contain the same
information as is listed in paragraph 2 of Article 12. In addition,
satisfactory evidence shall be submitted showing that the person
concerned has been informed of his rights under Articles 14 and 16, as
appropriate, and whether he wishes to exercise the rights stated there.
When a court ruling is sought as to whether the legal conditions have
been met, consent may not be granted until a final court ruling has
been given. Such cases shall be presented to the Reykjav=EDk District
Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. for a ruling.
In response to a request, the Ministry of Justice may permit a
temporary court or other court (cf. paragraph 2 of Article 11) to deal
with the case of a person who has been extradited, but only if it is
considered that treatment by that court will not jeopardize the case.

Article 21
The Ministry of Justice may grant permission for a person who is
extradited from one foreign state to another to be transported through
Icelandic territory except in cases where the provisions of Article 2
or Articles 4-6 prevent the extradition of persons from Iceland for the
offence.
In the case of extradition to Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden,
permission under paragraph 1 may be granted except in cases where the
provisions of Article 2 or Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962, on
extradition to those countries, prevent the extradition of persons from
Iceland to the state involved.



Chapter IV.
Other Assistance in Connection with Criminal Proceedings.
Article 22
In order to gather evidence for use in criminal proceedings in another
state, it may be decided, in response to a request, that the provisions
of the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure shall
be applied in the same way as in comparable proceedings in Iceland.
Requests shall be sent to the Ministry of Justice unless other
arrangements are made in an agreement with another state (cf. Article
6). A request shall contain information on the type of offence and
where and when it was committed. Requests may only be granted if it is
demonstrated that a decision has been taken on coercive measures which
are in conformity with the legislation of the state involved.
A request may not be granted if the act which it concerns, or a
comparable act, is not punishable under Icelandic law or if, under the
provisions of Articles 5-7, it can not constitute grounds for
extradition. In the case of requests from Denmark, Finland, Norway or
Sweden, the above conditions shall be replaced by the demand that
extradition in connection with the act is not permitted under the
provisions of Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962 on the extradition of
persons to those countries.
The Ministry of Justice shall immediately reject the request if the
conditions of paragraph 2 are not met, or if it is clear that the
request can not be granted. If a request is not rejected under this
paragraph, the case shall be sent to the Director of Public
Prosecutions for further treatment, and he shall take steps to have the
necessary investigation carried out immediately.
When the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send all the evidence in the case to the Ministry of
Justice, together with a report on it. The ministry shall then take a
decision on whether to grant the request.
Provision may be made in an agreement with a foreign state to have the
case dealt with by an authority other than the ministry.
If it is likely that a person residing in Iceland, who is not suspected
in connection with the case, has legally acquired an item which is to
be seized, then the condition for yielding him to the authorities of
another state shall be that he will be returned, free of charge, when
the conduct of the case is completed.

Article 23
In connection with the conduct of a criminal case in another state, it
may be decided, in response to a request, that a person who in
accordance with a sentence is imprisoned or deprived of his liberty for
a criminal offence shall be sent to another state for questioning as a
witness or for joint questioning.
Requests shall be sent to the Ministry of Justice unless other
arrangements are decided in an agreement with another state (cf.
Article 6). The request shall contain accurate information about the
criminal offence.
A request may not be granted if the act which it concerns, or a
comparable act, is not punishable under Icelandic law or if, under the
provisions of Articles 5-7, it can not constitute grounds for
extradition. In addition, a request shall be rejected if the presence
in Iceland of the person involved is necessary in connection with a
criminal case or if there are other cogent reasons against transferring
him to the other state. Particular consideration shall be given to
whether transferring him is likely to lengthen the period during which
he will be deprived of his freedom. In the case of requests from
Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden, the conditions of the first
sentence of this paragraph shall be replaced by the demand that
extradition in connection with the act is not permitted under the
provisions of Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962 on the extradition of
persons to those countries.
The Ministry of Justice shall immediately reject the request if it is
clear that it can not be granted. If a request is not rejected under
this paragraph, the case shall be sent to the Director of Public
Prosecutions for further treatment, and he shall take steps to have the
necessary investigation carried out immediately.
If the person concerned does not consent to be transferred, the
Reykjav=EDk District Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. shall deliver a
ruling as to whether the legal conditions for transferral have been
met. When the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send the Ministry of Justice all the evidence in the
case together with a report on the entire case. The ministry shall then
take a decision on whether to grant the request.
Provision may be made in an agreement with a foreign state to have the
case dealt with by an authority other than the ministry.
The condition set for the transferral of a person shall be that the
person concerned shall be returned at the first opportunity, possibly
within a specific period, and that while he resides in the foreign
country, no investigations in a case against him shall be initiated and
he shall not be punished there or extradited to another country for an
offence committed before the transferral took place.


Chapter V.
Final Provisions.

Article 24
Appeals against rulings given under this Act may be made to the Supreme
Court under the general rules of the Code of Criminal Procedure.


Article 25
Agreements may be made with other states concerning the obligation to
extradite persons and other assistance in criminal proceedings, with
specific conditions which may not, however, be at variance with the
provisions of this Act.
Without prejudice to this Act, extradition may be carried out and
requests for assistance in criminal proceedings may be granted to the
extent of Iceland's obligations under agreements made with other states
before the commencement of this Act.
Extradition and other assistance in criminal proceedings shall be
permitted under this Act even though Iceland is not obliged to provide
such assistance under an agreement on these matters with the state
involved.


Article 26
The provisions of Chapters I and II on extradition, and the provisions
of Chapter III dealing with extradition, shall not apply towards
Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.


Article 27
The Minister of Justice may issue regulations containing further
provisions on the application of this Act.


Article 28
This Act shall take effect on 1st July 1984.






This is an official translation of the regulation. The original
Icelandic text published in the Law Gazette is the authoritative text.
Laws and Regulations
Extradition of Criminals and Other Assistance in Criminal Proceedings
Act No. 13, 17th April 1984
Translated from the Icelandic


Extradition of Criminals
and Other Assistance in Criminal Proceedings Ac
tNo. 13, 17th April 1984

Chapter 1
Conditions for Extradition
Article 1
A person who is suspected of, indicted for, or has been sentenced for a
criminal offence in a foreign state may be extradited under this Act.


Article 2
Icelandic citizens may not be extradited.


Article 3
A person may only be extradited if the offence involved, or a
comparable offence, could be punishable by more than one year's
imprisonment under Icelandic law. Agreements may be made with other
states concerning extradition for offences which may be punishable by
shorter periods of imprisonment or punitive custody under Icelandic
law.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case shall only
be permitted if it has been decided in the foreign state that the
person whose extradition is requested is to be arrested or imprisoned
for the offence in question.
Unless other arrangements are made in an agreement with the state
involved, extradition for the enforcement of a judgement shall be
permitted only:

1=2E if the punishment specified in the judgement consists of at least 4
months' imprisonment or punitive custody,
2=2E if, according to the judgement or a decision taken in accordance
with an authorization in the judgement, the person sentenced is to be
placed in an institution, and the period he is to spend there may be at
least 4 months.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case or the
execution of punishment for additional offences may be permitted even
though the conditions under paragraphs 1-3 are met only in connection
with one offence.
If there is reason to believe that the suspicion concerning criminal
conduct, or the conclusion of a judgement under which extradition is
requested, does not meet the basic principles of Icelandic law
concerning reasonable suspicion of criminal conduct or legally
acceptable proof of guilt in criminal cases, then extradition shall not
be permitted.


Article 4
Extradition in connection with violations of martial law shall not be
permitted.


Article 5
Extradition in connection with political offences shall not be
permitted.
If the offence also constitutes a violation of legal provisions of a
non-political nature, extradition shall be permitted if the act is
considered as being political to a small degree.




Article 6
No person may be extradited if there is an appreciable risk that after
being extradited, he will be subjected to injustice or persecution
which is directed against his life or freedom, or is otherwise of a
serious nature, on account of his race, nationality, belief, political
opinions or for other political reasons.


Article 7
In special cases, applications for extradition may be refused if
humanitarian considerations, such as age, health or other personal
circumstances, argue against it.


Article 8
Extradition shall not be permitted when the person whose extradition is
requested has been convicted or acquitted in Iceland of the criminal
offence in question.
If an investigation concerning an accused person does not result in his
being indicted, he may not be extradited for the offence which was the
subject of the investigation unless the conditions of the Code Act No.
19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure for the institution of
proceedings are fulfilled.


Article 9
Extradition shall not be permitted if criminal liability, or the
punishment according to sentence, has expired or become invalid in some
other way under Icelandic law.


Article 10
When the person whose extradition is requested has been sentenced to
imprisonment or punitive custody, or, in accordance with a judgement or
under the authorization of a judgement, is to be placed, or has been
placed, in an institution for an offence other than that covered by the
application for extradition, he may not be extradited until he has
served the term of imprisonment or punitive custody or been discharged
from the institution. No person may be extradited if proceedings are in
progress in Iceland for an offence other than the one covered by the
application for extradition, and to which a punishment of at least 2
years' imprisonment or punitive custody may apply, or if the person is
in custody or has been released on bail according to provisions
established under the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal
Procedure.
Extradition in connection with the conduct of a court case may,
however, be permitted on condition that the person involved will be
sent back to Iceland as soon as possible after the conclusion of the
case.

Article 11
The following conditions shall be set for extradition:

1=2E That the person extradited will not be made to face legal
proceedings, or undergo punishment, or be extradited to a third state,
for another criminal offence committed before he was extradited unless:
a=2E the Ministry of Justice so permits (cf. Article 20), or
b=2E the person extradited has not left the country to which he was
extradited, even though he has had the opportunity of leaving it
without hindrance for at least 45 days, or
c=2E he has returned to the country to which he was extradited after
leaving it.
2=2E That the case involving the person extradited may not be conducted
by a temporary court or a court which is authorized only to deal with
the offence involved, or with particular exceptional cases, without the
permission of the Ministry of Justice.
3=2E That the death penalty may not be inflicted on the person
extradited.

Further conditions for extradition may be set.

Chapter II.
Procedure in Extradition Cases.
Article 12
Applications for extradition shall be made through diplomatic channels
unless other arrangements have been agreed with the state involved.
An application for extradition shall contain information about the
nationality of the person whose extradition is requested, his address
(if known) in Iceland, the nature of the offence and where and when it
was committed. If there exists a description of the person whose
extradition is requested, this shall be included. Furthermore,
applications for extradition shall be accompanied by a copy of the
legal provisions of which the offence is considered to be a violation.
If there are substantial obstacles to providing a copy, then it may be
regarded as sufficient to give an account of the legal provisions which
are believed to have been violated.
An application for extradition in connection with the investigation of
a case shall be accompanied by an original, or a certified photocopy,
of an arrest warrant or other decision regarding arrest which, under
the agreed arrangements, is in accordance with the legislation of the
state involved and presents arguments in support of the view that there
are valid reasons for suspecting the person concerned of having
committed a criminal offence.
Applications for the extradition of a person in connection with the
enforcement of a judgement shall be accompanied by the judgement or a
certified transcript thereof.


Article 13
If, on the grounds of the extradition application and the information
submitted with it, the Ministry of Justice considers that the
application should be rejected immediately, this shall be done.
If an application is not rejected immediately under paragraph 1, the
Ministry of Justice shall send the application to the Director of
Public Prosecutions, who shall be obliged to ensure that the necessary
investigation is carried out immediately.
Unless other provisions are made in this Act, the provisions of the
Code of Criminal Procedure shall be applied, as appropriate, to
investigations and other matters concerning extradition applications.


Article 14
The person whose extradition is requested may demand the ruling of the
Reykjav=EDk District Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. as to whether
the legal conditions for extradition have been met. In addition to
informing the person of the extradition application and the arguments
presented in support of it, the Director of Public Prosecutions shall
inform him of this authorization and of the fact that he has the
opportunity of having a legal advisor appointed under Article 16.
A demand for a ruling shall be submitted to the Director of Public
Prosecutions or the Ministry of Justice not later than 24 hours after
the person whose extradition is requested has been informed that the
Ministry of Justice has decided to grant the extradition request. If
there are special reasons, the Ministry of Justice may permit a
decision regarding extradition to be referred to a court even though
the deadline stated above has passed.
If an order is demanded within the legally prescribed period, or if an
exemption from the deadline has been granted, then extradition shall
not take place until a final court ruling has been delivered.

Article 15
In the course of an investigation in connection with an extradition
application, the coercive measures permitted under the Code of Criminal
Procedure in the investigation of comparable criminal cases may be
applied. Decisions on whether the conditions exist for applying
coercive measures may be based on the court decisions accompanying the
applications without further investigation of the demonstration of the
guilt of the person concerned.
The coercive measures mentioned above may be applied until it has been
established whether extradition is to take place, and, if it is
permitted, until it takes place. If a ruling is delivered authorizing
remand custody, it shall not be for a period of longer than 3 weeks. If
it is considered necessary to extend the custody period, this shall be
done by a ruling delivered by a court in which the person remanded in
custody is present. The custody period may not be extended by more than
2 weeks at a time.


Article 16
A judge shall appoint a legal advisor for the person whose extradition
is requested if the person or the Director of Public Prosecutions so
requests. A judge may also appoint a legal advisor on his own
initiative if he considers there is reason to do so.
The wages of the legal advisor and other legal costs shall be paid by
the Treasury. Under special circumstances, however, a judge may decide
that the person concerned shall pay the costs.


Article 17
As soon as the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send all evidence in the case to the Ministry of
Justice, together with a report on the case. The ministry shall then
take a decision on whether to authorize extradition.


Article 18
When the Ministry of Justice has decided to grant an extradition
application, extradition shall proceed as quickly as possible. If the
person whose extradition is requested is not in detention, he may be
arrested and remanded in custody until he is handed over, or his
freedom may be curtailed in other ways according to the provisions of
the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure.
A ruling on coercive measures shall not, however, be valid for more
than 30 days after a final decision on extradition has been taken.
However, a criminal court may decide, under particular circumstances
and at the request of the Ministry of Justice, that coercive measures
are to be applied for a specific further period.
When a person is extradited, it may be decided that items or valuables
which have been confiscated in connection with the case shall be made
over to the authority which requested the extradition, providing that
when such items are made over, provisos are stated, if there is
considered to be reason for doing so, in order to protect the rights of
third parties.


Chapter III.
Other Decisions in Connection with Extradition.
Article 19
If a person is sought by the authorities in a foreign state because he
is suspected of, has been indicted for, or has been convicted of, a
criminal offence which may constitute the basis for extradition under
this Act, the coercive measures prescribed in the Code of Criminal
Procedure may be applied to him in the same way as if he were accused
of the corresponding offence in Iceland. The same measures may be
applied if the relevant authorities announce that they intend to demand
the extradition of the person for the offence.
The Ministry of Justice shall be informed immediately of a decision on
coercive measures. The ministry may decide that coercive measures may
not be taken if it considers that no grounds for extradition exist. If
the ministry does not decide that coercive measures are to be
discontinued, it shall take steps to have the foreign state notified of
them, and to have them discontinued if an application for extradition
is not submitted at the first opportunity. If no extradition
application has been received within 30 days of the sending of the
notification, the coercive measures shall be discontinued. In special
circumstances, this period may be extended.


Article 20
In response to a request, the Ministry of Justice may authorize the
institution of legal proceedings against a person who has been
extradited under this Act, or give its consent for him to undergo
punishment for a criminal offence other than the one for which he was
extradited, and which was committed before the extradition. The same
shall apply regarding consent to have him extradited to a third state
in connection with a criminal offence committed before he was
extradited from Iceland.
Consent may only be granted if the person could have been extradited
under this Act for the offence. The provisions of Articles 14 and 16
shall also apply, as appropriate, to the granting of such consent.
Consent for the further extradition of the person to Denmark, Finland,
Norway or Sweden may, however, be granted if the conditions of the Act
No. 7/1962 for extradition to those countries apply.
Requests for consent under paragraph 1 shall contain the same
information as is listed in paragraph 2 of Article 12. In addition,
satisfactory evidence shall be submitted showing that the person
concerned has been informed of his rights under Articles 14 and 16, as
appropriate, and whether he wishes to exercise the rights stated there.
When a court ruling is sought as to whether the legal conditions have
been met, consent may not be granted until a final court ruling has
been given. Such cases shall be presented to the Reykjav=EDk District
Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. for a ruling.
In response to a request, the Ministry of Justice may permit a
temporary court or other court (cf. paragraph 2 of Article 11) to deal
with the case of a person who has been extradited, but only if it is
considered that treatment by that court will not jeopardize the case.

Article 21
The Ministry of Justice may grant permission for a person who is
extradited from one foreign state to another to be transported through
Icelandic territory except in cases where the provisions of Article 2
or Articles 4-6 prevent the extradition of persons from Iceland for the
offence.
In the case of extradition to Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden,
permission under paragraph 1 may be granted except in cases where the
provisions of Article 2 or Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962, on
extradition to those countries, prevent the extradition of persons from
Iceland to the state involved.



Chapter IV.
Other Assistance in Connection with Criminal Proceedings.
Article 22
In order to gather evidence for use in criminal proceedings in another
state, it may be decided, in response to a request, that the provisions
of the Code Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. of Criminal Procedure shall
be applied in the same way as in comparable proceedings in Iceland.
Requests shall be sent to the Ministry of Justice unless other
arrangements are made in an agreement with another state (cf. Article
6). A request shall contain information on the type of offence and
where and when it was committed. Requests may only be granted if it is
demonstrated that a decision has been taken on coercive measures which
are in conformity with the legislation of the state involved.
A request may not be granted if the act which it concerns, or a
comparable act, is not punishable under Icelandic law or if, under the
provisions of Articles 5-7, it can not constitute grounds for
extradition. In the case of requests from Denmark, Finland, Norway or
Sweden, the above conditions shall be replaced by the demand that
extradition in connection with the act is not permitted under the
provisions of Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962 on the extradition of
persons to those countries.
The Ministry of Justice shall immediately reject the request if the
conditions of paragraph 2 are not met, or if it is clear that the
request can not be granted. If a request is not rejected under this
paragraph, the case shall be sent to the Director of Public
Prosecutions for further treatment, and he shall take steps to have the
necessary investigation carried out immediately.
When the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send all the evidence in the case to the Ministry of
Justice, together with a report on it. The ministry shall then take a
decision on whether to grant the request.
Provision may be made in an agreement with a foreign state to have the
case dealt with by an authority other than the ministry.
If it is likely that a person residing in Iceland, who is not suspected
in connection with the case, has legally acquired an item which is to
be seized, then the condition for yielding him to the authorities of
another state shall be that he will be returned, free of charge, when
the conduct of the case is completed.

Article 23
In connection with the conduct of a criminal case in another state, it
may be decided, in response to a request, that a person who in
accordance with a sentence is imprisoned or deprived of his liberty for
a criminal offence shall be sent to another state for questioning as a
witness or for joint questioning.
Requests shall be sent to the Ministry of Justice unless other
arrangements are decided in an agreement with another state (cf.
Article 6). The request shall contain accurate information about the
criminal offence.
A request may not be granted if the act which it concerns, or a
comparable act, is not punishable under Icelandic law or if, under the
provisions of Articles 5-7, it can not constitute grounds for
extradition. In addition, a request shall be rejected if the presence
in Iceland of the person involved is necessary in connection with a
criminal case or if there are other cogent reasons against transferring
him to the other state. Particular consideration shall be given to
whether transferring him is likely to lengthen the period during which
he will be deprived of his freedom. In the case of requests from
Denmark, Finland, Norway or Sweden, the conditions of the first
sentence of this paragraph shall be replaced by the demand that
extradition in connection with the act is not permitted under the
provisions of Article 4 of the Act No. 7/1962 on the extradition of
persons to those countries.
The Ministry of Justice shall immediately reject the request if it is
clear that it can not be granted. If a request is not rejected under
this paragraph, the case shall be sent to the Director of Public
Prosecutions for further treatment, and he shall take steps to have the
necessary investigation carried out immediately.
If the person concerned does not consent to be transferred, the
Reykjav=EDk District Court Act No. 19/1991, Article 195. shall deliver a
ruling as to whether the legal conditions for transferral have been
met. When the investigation has been completed, the Director of Public
Prosecutions shall send the Ministry of Justice all the evidence in the
case together with a report on the entire case. The ministry shall then
take a decision on whether to grant the request.
Provision may be made in an agreement with a foreign state to have the
case dealt with by an authority other than the ministry.
The condition set for the transferral of a person shall be that the
person concerned shall be returned at the first opportunity, possibly
within a specific period, and that while he resides in the foreign
country, no investigations in a case against him shall be initiated and
he shall not be punished there or extradited to another country for an
offence committed before the transferral took place.


Chapter V.
Final Provisions.

Article 24
Appeals against rulings given under this Act may be made to the Supreme
Court under the general rules of the Code of Criminal Procedure.


Article 25
Agreements may be made with other states concerning the obligation to
extradite persons and other assistance in criminal proceedings, with
specific conditions which may not, however, be at variance with the
provisions of this Act.
Without prejudice to this Act, extradition may be carried out and
requests for assistance in criminal proceedings may be granted to the
extent of Iceland's obligations under agreements made with other states
before the commencement of this Act.
Extradition and other assistance in criminal proceedings shall be
permitted under this Act even though Iceland is not obliged to provide
such assistance under an agreement on these matters with the state
involved.


Article 26
The provisions of Chapters I and II on extradition, and the provisions
of Chapter III dealing with extradition, shall not apply towards
Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.


Article 27
The Minister of Justice may issue regulations containing further
provisions on the application of this Act.


Article 28=20
This Act shall take effect on 1st July 1984.






Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
News reports on what is hopefully Fischer's impending release banana rec.games.chess.misc (Chess General) 5 March 24th 05 06:18 PM
Expelled Barbara Villiers rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 0 March 11th 05 01:02 PM
Win a date with Barbara Gordo by Ray Villiers Barbara Villiers rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 0 March 11th 05 12:59 PM
Ebay ratings Pete Weber rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 2 March 11th 05 12:44 PM
Truong the hypocrite BarbaraVilliers rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 3 March 11th 05 12:44 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017