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Old May 6th 05, 11:19 AM
Bugsy
 
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Default Unjust penalty for chess mistake


Unjust penalty for chess mistake

By QUAH SENG SUN

A few days ago, I received a telephone call from a Tony Tan in Ipoh who
was pouring out his woes to me regarding one local event that he had
played in.

Apparently, what had happened was that in the second round of this
tournament, both he and his opponent had played with the wrong colours
on the board. Tan was supposed to have played Black but when he saw his
opponent seated on the black side of the chessboard, he did not give it
much thought and started playing with the white pieces.

After the game was over and the results reported to the organisers, he
suddenly found himself penalised with a loss while his opponent, who had
lost the game, was awarded the win.

I can imagine his consternation and indignation over this turn of events
because he said that the organisers did not display the pairings for the
second round and had instead, just shouted out the pairings above the
din of the playing hall.

Now, what would you do if you were in the shoes of these organisers?
Would you agree with them and reverse the results to favour the player
that had lost the game, or would you have some other alternative
solution? To be sure, I am not saying that the organisers’ technical
decision was wrong but it was clearly a little overly harsh and
inflexible.

They could have been more Solomon-like and allowed the result to stay.
Deducting a point from any player is very serious; organisers would need
to be very certain that a gross misconduct, like an intentional breaking
of the chess rules, had occurred. Even then, the recommended course of
action would be simply to give the players a warning.

If an infraction occurs again, there are still other lesser penalties,
such as deducting one or two minutes from a player’s clock or adding
this extra time to his opponent. I would not go so far as to penalise
the player with a loss immediately. Though not entirely blameless – the
player has to bear his part of the blame in not determining the exact
colour he was to use – the organisers were also equally at fault,
especially since the pairings were not displayed publicly in the first
place.

The most acceptable course would have been to leave the result alone.
The organiser is well within his power to just switch the affected
players’ colours around in the computer program. Even if the pairings
had been made manually, changing the colours would not affect the
running of the tournament in any great way.

There is another reason why I would discourage this practice: I do not
like organisers to suddenly adopt this as a precedence. It should not be
the case or else in the future, you will begin seeing players who will
deliberately try to abuse this ruling to their advantage.
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Old May 6th 05, 07:25 PM
David Ames
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Bugsy wrote:
Unjust penalty for chess mistake

By QUAH SENG SUN

A few days ago, I received a telephone call from a Tony Tan in Ipoh

who
was pouring out his woes to me regarding one local event that he had
played in.

Apparently, what had happened was that in the second round of this
tournament, both he and his opponent had played with the wrong

colours
on the board. Tan was supposed to have played Black but when he saw

his
opponent seated on the black side of the chessboard, he did not give

it
much thought and started playing with the white pieces.

After the game was over and the results reported to the organisers,

he
suddenly found himself penalised with a loss while his opponent, who

had
lost the game, was awarded the win.


I believe the rules provide that the game is lost by the player who
resigns. Appeal to the Tournament Committee.

David Ames
I can imagine his consternation and indignation over this turn of

events
because he said that the organisers did not display the pairings for

the
second round and had instead, just shouted out the pairings above the


din of the playing hall.

Now, what would you do if you were in the shoes of these organisers?
Would you agree with them and reverse the results to favour the

player
that had lost the game, or would you have some other alternative
solution? To be sure, I am not saying that the organisers'

technical
decision was wrong but it was clearly a little overly harsh and
inflexible.

They could have been more Solomon-like and allowed the result to

stay.
Deducting a point from any player is very serious; organisers would

need
to be very certain that a gross misconduct, like an intentional

breaking
of the chess rules, had occurred. Even then, the recommended course

of
action would be simply to give the players a warning.

If an infraction occurs again, there are still other lesser

penalties,
such as deducting one or two minutes from a player's clock or

adding
this extra time to his opponent. I would not go so far as to penalise


the player with a loss immediately. Though not entirely blameless -

the
player has to bear his part of the blame in not determining the exact


colour he was to use - the organisers were also equally at fault,
especially since the pairings were not displayed publicly in the

first
place.

The most acceptable course would have been to leave the result alone.


The organiser is well within his power to just switch the affected
players' colours around in the computer program. Even if the

pairings
had been made manually, changing the colours would not affect the
running of the tournament in any great way.

There is another reason why I would discourage this practice: I do

not
like organisers to suddenly adopt this as a precedence. It should not

be
the case or else in the future, you will begin seeing players who

will
deliberately try to abuse this ruling to their advantage.


  #3   Report Post  
Old May 6th 05, 07:42 PM
George John
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Bugsy wrote:
Unjust penalty for chess mistake

By QUAH SENG SUN

A few days ago, I received a telephone call from a Tony Tan in Ipoh

who
was pouring out his woes to me regarding one local event that he had
played in.

Apparently, what had happened was that in the second round of this
tournament, both he and his opponent had played with the wrong

colours
on the board. Tan was supposed to have played Black but when he saw

his
opponent seated on the black side of the chessboard, he did not give

it
much thought and started playing with the white pieces.

After the game was over and the results reported to the organisers,

he
suddenly found himself penalised with a loss while his opponent, who

had
lost the game, was awarded the win.

I can imagine his consternation and indignation over this turn of

events
because he said that the organisers did not display the pairings for

the
second round and had instead, just shouted out the pairings above the


din of the playing hall.

Now, what would you do if you were in the shoes of these organisers?
Would you agree with them and reverse the results to favour the

player
that had lost the game, or would you have some other alternative
solution? To be sure, I am not saying that the organisers'

technical
decision was wrong but it was clearly a little overly harsh and
inflexible.

They could have been more Solomon-like and allowed the result to

stay.
Deducting a point from any player is very serious; organisers would

need
to be very certain that a gross misconduct, like an intentional

breaking
of the chess rules, had occurred. Even then, the recommended course

of
action would be simply to give the players a warning.

If an infraction occurs again, there are still other lesser

penalties,
such as deducting one or two minutes from a player's clock or

adding
this extra time to his opponent. I would not go so far as to penalise


the player with a loss immediately. Though not entirely blameless -

the
player has to bear his part of the blame in not determining the exact


colour he was to use - the organisers were also equally at fault,
especially since the pairings were not displayed publicly in the

first
place.

The most acceptable course would have been to leave the result alone.


The organiser is well within his power to just switch the affected
players' colours around in the computer program. Even if the

pairings
had been made manually, changing the colours would not affect the
running of the tournament in any great way.

There is another reason why I would discourage this practice: I do

not
like organisers to suddenly adopt this as a precedence. It should not

be
the case or else in the future, you will begin seeing players who

will
deliberately try to abuse this ruling to their advantage.


The first key point is if a player ever thinks he or she is being
treated unfairly or a tournament director has ruled incorrectly, the
decision should be appealed immediately! If the Chief TD is involved,
I believe the 5th Edition of the USCF Rules of Chess recommends appeals
go to a Special Referee instead of an onsite appeal committee.

Based only on the evidence presented here, I think the penalty was too
harsh.

But, other factors may be at work here, does this player have a history
of playing the wrong color and had been previously warned about this
issue?

If there was no prior adverse history, both players should have been
equally punished, since it is the responsibility of both to play the
correct color.

Best regards,

George John

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