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Old June 18th 05, 01:38 AM
R.P. Warren
 
Posts: n/a
Default Are these Sloan games?

Sam Sloan wrote:
Grudge match: Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs. Bauer.
In all of these postings about a grudge match, I have lost track of
which march they are talking about, Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs.
Bauer.
I think just about everybody realizes that Kingston is such a weak
player that he would have no chance whatever against the great me.


I'd like to ask Sam about these games. Sometimes databases have bogus
games, so I am not absolutely sure these are by Sam himself, but the
database (Master Chess 98) lists them as being by 'Sloan,S'.

Sloan-Neff, US Open, Concord 1995
Position after 43...Rd7-c7:
B: Kd6, Rc7, Rh8, a7, b6, h7
W: Kh2, Rc4, Be4, a6, b5 d3, f5, g4, h3

White is in fine shape here, down the exchange but up three pawns.
Simplification is called for, e.g. 44.Rxc7 Kxc7 45. Kg3 Kd6 46.Kh4 and
it's only a matter of time. But White here had other ideas. The game
actually went:

44.Rd4+?! Ke5 45.Rd5+ Kf4 46.Rd6? (better 46.f6 Rc2+ 47.Bg2 Rf8 48.Rd7
Rxf6 49.Rxa7 Ra2 50.Rxh7+-) 46...Rc2+ 47.Kg1 Kg3 48.Kf1 Rhc8 49.d4??
(White has walked into a mating net. 49.Rc6 was required.) 49...Rf2+
50.Ke1 Rc1#. Practically a help-mate.

Sloan-Eldridge, World Open, Philadelphia 1996
Position after 23...Qd8-f6:
B: Kh8, Qf6, Rf8, Bd5, Bh4 a7, e6, f7, g6, h6
W: Kd1, Qc2, Rc7, Rg1, Ne5, a2, b2, d4, e3, e2, h2

In this position, White could have smashed through in a blaze of glory
with 24.Rxf7! Rxf7 25.Nxg6+ Kg7 26.Nxh4+ and Black is doomed. But that
did not happen:

24.Rc8? Throwing away most of White's advantage. 24...Rxc8 25.Qxc8+ Kg7
26.Nd3? (better 26.Qd7 Qe7 27.Kd2 Qxd7 28.Nxd7 Be7 (28...Bxa2 29.Ra1)
29.b3, and White is OK.) 26...Bxa2 27.Qc7 Qe7 28.Qxe7 Bxe7 29.Kd2 Bd6
Now we have a sort of reverse of the first game. Black is down the
exchange but ahead in pawns. The difference is, he knows what to do
with them. 30.h3 Bd5 31.Ra1 Bb8 32.Nf4 Be4 33.Rc1 g5 34.Rc8 Bd6 35.Nd3
h5 36.Nc5 Bg2 37.b4 Bxh3 38.Ra8 Bg2 39.Rxa7 Kg6 40.e4 h4 41.Ke3 Bg3
42.Ra1h3 43.Rg1 h2 44.Rxg2 Bf4+ 45.Kf3 h1Q 46.Nd3 Qh3+ 47.Kf2 Be3+ 0-1.
Truly a case of defeat snatched from the jaws of victory.

If the database is wrong, and Sloan did not actually play these games,
then disregard them. If he actually did, 'The Great Me' does not look
so great.

  #2   Report Post  
Old June 18th 05, 02:29 AM
Sam Sloan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 17 Jun 2005 17:38:09 -0700, "R.P. Warren"
wrote:

Sam Sloan wrote:
Grudge match: Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs. Bauer.
In all of these postings about a grudge match, I have lost track of
which march they are talking about, Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs.
Bauer.
I think just about everybody realizes that Kingston is such a weak
player that he would have no chance whatever against the great me.


I'd like to ask Sam about these games. Sometimes databases have bogus
games, so I am not absolutely sure these are by Sam himself, but the
database (Master Chess 98) lists them as being by 'Sloan,S'.

Sloan-Neff, US Open, Concord 1995
Position after 43...Rd7-c7:
B: Kd6, Rc7, Rh8, a7, b6, h7
W: Kh2, Rc4, Be4, a6, b5 d3, f5, g4, h3

White is in fine shape here, down the exchange but up three pawns.
Simplification is called for, e.g. 44.Rxc7 Kxc7 45. Kg3 Kd6 46.Kh4 and
it's only a matter of time. But White here had other ideas. The game
actually went:

44.Rd4+?! Ke5 45.Rd5+ Kf4 46.Rd6? (better 46.f6 Rc2+ 47.Bg2 Rf8 48.Rd7
Rxf6 49.Rxa7 Ra2 50.Rxh7+-) 46...Rc2+ 47.Kg1 Kg3 48.Kf1 Rhc8 49.d4??
(White has walked into a mating net. 49.Rc6 was required.) 49...Rf2+
50.Ke1 Rc1#. Practically a help-mate.

Sloan-Eldridge, World Open, Philadelphia 1996
Position after 23...Qd8-f6:
B: Kh8, Qf6, Rf8, Bd5, Bh4 a7, e6, f7, g6, h6
W: Kd1, Qc2, Rc7, Rg1, Ne5, a2, b2, d4, e3, e2, h2

In this position, White could have smashed through in a blaze of glory
with 24.Rxf7! Rxf7 25.Nxg6+ Kg7 26.Nxh4+ and Black is doomed. But that
did not happen:

24.Rc8? Throwing away most of White's advantage. 24...Rxc8 25.Qxc8+ Kg7
26.Nd3? (better 26.Qd7 Qe7 27.Kd2 Qxd7 28.Nxd7 Be7 (28...Bxa2 29.Ra1)
29.b3, and White is OK.) 26...Bxa2 27.Qc7 Qe7 28.Qxe7 Bxe7 29.Kd2 Bd6
Now we have a sort of reverse of the first game. Black is down the
exchange but ahead in pawns. The difference is, he knows what to do
with them. 30.h3 Bd5 31.Ra1 Bb8 32.Nf4 Be4 33.Rc1 g5 34.Rc8 Bd6 35.Nd3
h5 36.Nc5 Bg2 37.b4 Bxh3 38.Ra8 Bg2 39.Rxa7 Kg6 40.e4 h4 41.Ke3 Bg3
42.Ra1h3 43.Rg1 h2 44.Rxg2 Bf4+ 45.Kf3 h1Q 46.Nd3 Qh3+ 47.Kf2 Be3+ 0-1.
Truly a case of defeat snatched from the jaws of victory.

If the database is wrong, and Sloan did not actually play these games,
then disregard them. If he actually did, 'The Great Me' does not look
so great.


Yes. Those are both my games. You have managed to pick two games where
I was winning easily but played badly and lost.

Please note however that my opponent in the first game was a master
and my opponent in the second game was an expert. This hardly
demonstrated that I would not be able to beat Taylor Kingston, who is
rated 1811.

I am still angry that I lost the first game. Yes. I obviously should
have traded rooks. I could not understand why I did not do that. Even
being in time trouble was not an excuse for not making such an obvious
move.

I have no excuse for the second loss. I just thought I had an easy win
and did not see the danger until it was too late.

Both games involved disputes. In the first game, my opponent was a
member of some religion which prohibited his from playing at the
scheduled time. I was brought in as a filler. After I got a winning
position, my opponent thought himself down to almost no time and then
brought in his sister to keep score. I protested and the tournament
director was called, who ruled in my favor. At about this time, I
started making the blunders which lost the game.

In the second game, my opponent complained that I was too strong. He
wanted to be paired against a weaker opponent. Steve Immitt, the
director, was called, and he ruled that the pairing was correct. My
opponent played the game under protest. After he won the game, he
withdrew his protest.

I am not using these disputes as an excuse for my bad play, however.

Sam Sloan
  #3   Report Post  
Old June 18th 05, 05:22 AM
The Historian
 
Posts: n/a
Default



R.P. Warren wrote:
Sam Sloan wrote:
Grudge match: Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs. Bauer.
In all of these postings about a grudge match, I have lost track of
which march they are talking about, Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs.
Bauer.
I think just about everybody realizes that Kingston is such a weak
player that he would have no chance whatever against the great me.


I'd like to ask Sam about these games. Sometimes databases have bogus
games, so I am not absolutely sure these are by Sam himself, but the
database (Master Chess 98) lists them as being by 'Sloan,S'.

Sloan-Neff, US Open, Concord 1995
Position after 43...Rd7-c7:
B: Kd6, Rc7, Rh8, a7, b6, h7
W: Kh2, Rc4, Be4, a6, b5 d3, f5, g4, h3

White is in fine shape here, down the exchange but up three pawns.
Simplification is called for, e.g. 44.Rxc7 Kxc7 45. Kg3 Kd6 46.Kh4 and
it's only a matter of time. But White here had other ideas. The game
actually went:

44.Rd4+?! Ke5 45.Rd5+ Kf4 46.Rd6? (better 46.f6 Rc2+ 47.Bg2 Rf8 48.Rd7
Rxf6 49.Rxa7 Ra2 50.Rxh7+-) 46...Rc2+ 47.Kg1 Kg3 48.Kf1 Rhc8 49.d4??
(White has walked into a mating net. 49.Rc6 was required.) 49...Rf2+
50.Ke1 Rc1#. Practically a help-mate.

Sloan-Eldridge, World Open, Philadelphia 1996
Position after 23...Qd8-f6:
B: Kh8, Qf6, Rf8, Bd5, Bh4 a7, e6, f7, g6, h6
W: Kd1, Qc2, Rc7, Rg1, Ne5, a2, b2, d4, e3, e2, h2

In this position, White could have smashed through in a blaze of glory
with 24.Rxf7! Rxf7 25.Nxg6+ Kg7 26.Nxh4+ and Black is doomed. But that
did not happen:

24.Rc8? Throwing away most of White's advantage. 24...Rxc8 25.Qxc8+ Kg7
26.Nd3? (better 26.Qd7 Qe7 27.Kd2 Qxd7 28.Nxd7 Be7 (28...Bxa2 29.Ra1)
29.b3, and White is OK.) 26...Bxa2 27.Qc7 Qe7 28.Qxe7 Bxe7 29.Kd2 Bd6
Now we have a sort of reverse of the first game. Black is down the
exchange but ahead in pawns. The difference is, he knows what to do
with them. 30.h3 Bd5 31.Ra1 Bb8 32.Nf4 Be4 33.Rc1 g5 34.Rc8 Bd6 35.Nd3
h5 36.Nc5 Bg2 37.b4 Bxh3 38.Ra8 Bg2 39.Rxa7 Kg6 40.e4 h4 41.Ke3 Bg3
42.Ra1h3 43.Rg1 h2 44.Rxg2 Bf4+ 45.Kf3 h1Q 46.Nd3 Qh3+ 47.Kf2 Be3+ 0-1.
Truly a case of defeat snatched from the jaws of victory.

If the database is wrong, and Sloan did not actually play these games,
then disregard them. If he actually did, 'The Great Me' does not look
so great.


More of the Sam Sloan magic touch:

[Event "World Open 1999"]
[Site "Philadelphia"]
[Date "1999.07.04"]
[Round "7"]
[White "Weber,Joseph"]
[Black "Sloan,Sam"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C33"]
[WhiteElo "2260"]
[BlackElo "2105"]
[PlyCount "69"]

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Bc4 d5 4. Bxd5 c6 5. Bb3 Qh4+ 6. Kf1 Bd6 7. Nf3
Qe7 8.
d4 f6

Weakening both flanks.

9. Nc3 Bg4 10. Qd3 Nd7 11. Bd2 O-O-O

Kiddies, this is called castling into it.

12. a4 Nh6 13. a5 Rhe8 14. a6 b5 15.h3 Bh5

15....Bxf3 was better

16. Nxb5 cxb5 17. Qxb5 Nb6 18. Qxh5 Qxe4 19. Re1 Qc6 20. Kf2 Rxe1 21.
Rxe1 Nc4 22. Bxc4 Qxc4 23. Ba5 Bc7 24. Bxc7 Qxc2+ 25. Re2 Qxc7 26. Qb5
Nf7 27.
Qf5+ Kb8 28. Rc2 Qd6 29. Rc5 Ng5 30. h4 g6 31. Qc2 Qxa6 32. hxg5 fxg5
33. Ne5
Re8 34. Ra5 Rc8 35. Qb3+ { 35. ... Qb7 36. Rb5 Rc2+ 37. Ke1 } 1-0

  #4   Report Post  
Old June 18th 05, 05:30 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Chess is hard.

He's a bad human being, but not at all a bad player.

  #5   Report Post  
Old June 18th 05, 07:03 AM
Jürgen R.
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sat, 18 Jun 2005 01:29:11 GMT, (Sam Sloan)
wrote:

On 17 Jun 2005 17:38:09 -0700, "R.P. Warren"
wrote:

Sam Sloan wrote:
Grudge match: Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs. Bauer.
In all of these postings about a grudge match, I have lost track of
which march they are talking about, Sloan vs. Kingston or Sloan vs.
Bauer.
I think just about everybody realizes that Kingston is such a weak
player that he would have no chance whatever against the great me.


I'd like to ask Sam about these games. Sometimes databases have bogus
games, so I am not absolutely sure these are by Sam himself, but the
database (Master Chess 98) lists them as being by 'Sloan,S'.

Sloan-Neff, US Open, Concord 1995
Position after 43...Rd7-c7:
B: Kd6, Rc7, Rh8, a7, b6, h7
W: Kh2, Rc4, Be4, a6, b5 d3, f5, g4, h3

White is in fine shape here, down the exchange but up three pawns.
Simplification is called for, e.g. 44.Rxc7 Kxc7 45. Kg3 Kd6 46.Kh4 and
it's only a matter of time. But White here had other ideas. The game
actually went:

44.Rd4+?! Ke5 45.Rd5+ Kf4 46.Rd6? (better 46.f6 Rc2+ 47.Bg2 Rf8 48.Rd7
Rxf6 49.Rxa7 Ra2 50.Rxh7+-) 46...Rc2+ 47.Kg1 Kg3 48.Kf1 Rhc8 49.d4??
(White has walked into a mating net. 49.Rc6 was required.) 49...Rf2+
50.Ke1 Rc1#. Practically a help-mate.

Sloan-Eldridge, World Open, Philadelphia 1996
Position after 23...Qd8-f6:
B: Kh8, Qf6, Rf8, Bd5, Bh4 a7, e6, f7, g6, h6
W: Kd1, Qc2, Rc7, Rg1, Ne5, a2, b2, d4, e3, e2, h2

In this position, White could have smashed through in a blaze of glory
with 24.Rxf7! Rxf7 25.Nxg6+ Kg7 26.Nxh4+ and Black is doomed. But that
did not happen:

24.Rc8? Throwing away most of White's advantage. 24...Rxc8 25.Qxc8+ Kg7
26.Nd3? (better 26.Qd7 Qe7 27.Kd2 Qxd7 28.Nxd7 Be7 (28...Bxa2 29.Ra1)
29.b3, and White is OK.) 26...Bxa2 27.Qc7 Qe7 28.Qxe7 Bxe7 29.Kd2 Bd6
Now we have a sort of reverse of the first game. Black is down the
exchange but ahead in pawns. The difference is, he knows what to do
with them. 30.h3 Bd5 31.Ra1 Bb8 32.Nf4 Be4 33.Rc1 g5 34.Rc8 Bd6 35.Nd3
h5 36.Nc5 Bg2 37.b4 Bxh3 38.Ra8 Bg2 39.Rxa7 Kg6 40.e4 h4 41.Ke3 Bg3
42.Ra1h3 43.Rg1 h2 44.Rxg2 Bf4+ 45.Kf3 h1Q 46.Nd3 Qh3+ 47.Kf2 Be3+ 0-1.
Truly a case of defeat snatched from the jaws of victory.

If the database is wrong, and Sloan did not actually play these games,
then disregard them. If he actually did, 'The Great Me' does not look
so great.


Yes. Those are both my games. You have managed to pick two games where
I was winning easily but played badly and lost.


Wrong, as usual. You probably meant that anybody else would have won
easily, but you were losing.


Please note however that my opponent in the first game was a master
and my opponent in the second game was an expert. This hardly
demonstrated that I would not be able to beat Taylor Kingston, who is
rated 1811.

I am still angry that I lost the first game. Yes. I obviously should
have traded rooks. I could not understand why I did not do that.


It was because of the deal with Henry Kissinger, who believed that
Neff should be the next world champion. Remember? Kissinger threatened
to have the CIA kidnap all of your daughters if you refused to lose
this game.

Even
being in time trouble was not an excuse for not making such an obvious
move.


Which proves that the game must have been rigged.


I have no excuse for the second loss. I just thought I had an easy win
and did not see the danger until it was too late.


How can you forget? Eldridge was Hillary's lover at the time.
Remember? He was the actual reason why Slick Willy got so horny that
he thought Monica was charming. During the game Hillary kept sending
you messages promising that you could have a piece of Monica if you
lost.

Sloan, you are a dung beetle.



Both games involved disputes. In the first game, my opponent was a
member of some religion which prohibited his from playing at the
scheduled time. I was brought in as a filler. After I got a winning
position, my opponent thought himself down to almost no time and then
brought in his sister to keep score. I protested and the tournament
director was called, who ruled in my favor. At about this time, I
started making the blunders which lost the game.

In the second game, my opponent complained that I was too strong. He
wanted to be paired against a weaker opponent. Steve Immitt, the
director, was called, and he ruled that the pairing was correct. My
opponent played the game under protest. After he won the game, he
withdrew his protest.

I am not using these disputes as an excuse for my bad play, however.




Sam Sloan




  #6   Report Post  
Old June 18th 05, 07:11 AM
Tyrone Slothrop
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This is not at all going the right way. Just before a grudge match is
not the time to be caught making sympathetic statements about your
soon-to-be opponent. Better fall back to the "kiddief*cker"
sobriquet...

wrote:
Chess is hard.

He's a bad human being, but not at all a bad player.


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