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Old January 23rd 06, 08:04 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Ray Gordon
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the next
tournament?





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Old January 23rd 06, 09:17 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
EZoto
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

On Mon, 23 Jan 2006 20:04:01 GMT, "Ray Gordon"
wrote:

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the next
tournament?

How do you like that. The sleaze has a legitimate question. The
answer though is most likely not. Nick DeFirmian came with a great
response to a similiar question. You can be a GM in the USA by
traveling to other countries, barely making ends meet and eating gruel
and busting your tail off then you can make a GM if your that good
enough. There has to be a combination of many things to have an
american player at that level. Seirawan I think was the last great
american player. I don't really include Kamsky though even though he
is an american citizen.

EZoto
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Old January 23rd 06, 09:36 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Ray Gordon
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and
who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the
next
tournament?

How do you like that. The sleaze has a legitimate question.


Seems anyone who trains more than 50 hours a week at chess is a sleaze.

The
answer though is most likely not. Nick DeFirmian came with a great
response to a similiar question. You can be a GM in the USA by
traveling to other countries, barely making ends meet and eating gruel
and busting your tail off then you can make a GM if your that good
enough. There has to be a combination of many things to have an
american player at that level. Seirawan I think was the last great
american player. I don't really include Kamsky though even though he
is an american citizen.


Kamsky is an American who got his game in Russia. Seirawan was top-10 in
the world in his day, but could he have done better?

One need not travel to get GM norms, as the World Open offers them, and that
tournament is in my backyard.

Twenty years ago, I heard, in no uncertain terms, that the "Dalton Gang" and
the other prodigies of the day would be champions by now, but that didn't
materialize. I look at myself and if I'm lucky I have maybe another decade
left in top form, which *may* be enough time to make some noise, but I don't
focus on the results, just the training.

When I first trained seriously at chess, I said to myself that I couldn't
become the best player in America overnight, but that I could become the
hardest-working, and did, for four years. From 1987-1991 I doubt there was
a single player in this country who put more hours in over the board than I
did. Now I train full-time, but only to the extent that I can, and
distractions do surface.



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Old January 24th 06, 12:29 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Antonio Torrecillas
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

En/na Ray Gordon ha escrit:
Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the next
tournament?


A single hour each day "well designed/directed" can be more profitable
than full-time in the wrong path.

AT

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Old January 24th 06, 12:38 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Antonio Torrecillas
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

En/na Ray Gordon ha escrit:

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the next
tournament?


Was the subject of this message correct?
.... or this message belong to "Chess Jokes" ?

True champions do not train more hours than "losers", ... they simply
use better their time (in many cases guided by good trainers).

AT

Ps:
Ray, actually do you think you will be a "champion" following your 1/x
rule? (why not the 1/x^2 rule? .. or the 1/0.99^x rule?)

Why do not you concentrate in being "champion" before trying to convince
us you will be "champion" in the future?



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Old January 24th 06, 12:49 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Ray Gordon
 
Posts: n/a
Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and
who plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning
the next tournament?


A single hour each day "well designed/directed" can be more profitable
than full-time in the wrong path.


Name one world champion who has done this successfully.

Fischer and Kasparov trained about 70 hours a week each, and their ratings
reflected it.



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Old January 24th 06, 12:51 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Ray Gordon
 
Posts: n/a
Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and
who plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning
the next tournament?


Was the subject of this message correct?
... or this message belong to "Chess Jokes" ?

True champions do not train more hours than "losers", ... they simply use
better their time (in many cases guided by good trainers).


Fischer trained 12 hours a day, six days a week, without coaching.


Ps:
Ray, actually do you think you will be a "champion" following your 1/x
rule? (why not the 1/x^2 rule? .. or the 1/0.99^x rule?)


I believe that a player who began using my method today, if he has natural
talent for the game, and is willing to train full-time for the next 15
years, would become a champion or damn close, using my exact method
(front-loaded opening study but also a well-rounded approach to the game).

I "study" the middlegame and endgame simply by not studying the opening and
forcing myself to gain rating points in those areas instead.

Why do not you concentrate in being "champion" before trying to convince
us you will be "champion" in the future?


I said I train like a champion. I am 39 years old and it is doubtful I
would even have enough time to get to the top. On the other hand, I can
carve out a path that a younger prodigy could follow and use to become
champion down the road.



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Old January 24th 06, 03:49 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
EZoto
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one


Kamsky is an American who got his game in Russia. Seirawan was top-10 in
the world in his day, but could he have done better?


Yes he could have done better. Reasons why not I don't know. Have
you ever thought that maybe he didn't want to? Maybe he wanted a life
other than chess. Seirawan seems a lot more stable mentally than
Fischer.

EZoto
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Old January 24th 06, 04:08 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Ray Gordon
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one

Kamsky is an American who got his game in Russia. Seirawan was top-10 in
the world in his day, but could he have done better?


Yes he could have done better. Reasons why not I don't know. Have
you ever thought that maybe he didn't want to?


I've met Yasser Seirawan many times. He responded to a remark I made in the
Philadelphia Inquirer during the World Open one year where I was discussing
why I felt a champion needed to train 17 hours a day. The reporter wound up
quoting me.

At the time I said "I could give Seirawan a few headaches now. In five
years I could give him a lot of headaches." Looking back, I was one step
off: after four years, I could give him a few headaches, so maybe five years
from now I'll make the quote come true. I doubt he's training as hard as I
am, but it'd be cool if he were.

At the tournament, however, I was two passed-pawns up on the Black side of
the Gruenfeld and beating my A-rated opponent like a drum when I sensed
someone watching the game. I looked up to see Yasser give an approving nod
with a smile, acknowledged him, and finished off the win. I got the
impression that he took me seriously as a player in that he seemed as
curious as I was to see if that much study for five years would bridge the
gap.

Keep in mind that back in the 1980s, one could not train at home on the
internet servers against world-class competition, nor could they "proofread"
their games with programs like Fritz, even though we knew this day was
coming (and feared it horribly). Now, I can play all day and night for next
to nothing, even in online tournaments (some for cash), and feed the games
into a computer to find out instantly where I went wrong. I can compare
this information to what I learned during the "dark ages," when we had to
GUESS what the best moves were, which is why studying theory was so
important. For that, I had 150 chess books in an era where computers were
not strong, and that was state of the art. The books covered every major
opening (lots of Nunn and Keene), all the ECOs, Informants (a
mickey-boom-boom-down), a slew of general theory books (like King Power in
Chess), tons of specialized endgame books (such as Queen and Pawn endings,
which I spent about two full weeks), and lots of biographies of every world
champion or near-champion to give me a human perspective. That is how you
get your rating to improve 500 points in two years.

I used to commute regularly to northern New Jersey and NYC to find strong
competition, while the four CCA tournaments in Philadelphia rounded out my
schedule. I sublet apartments in Manhattan and Brooklyn once each so I
could play full time for a month or two, and even once ran into Maurice
Ashley on a train in Brooklyn, where he took me to the strong chess tables
in Prospect Park. Other times, I would often commute to the Manhattan for
the "four rated games tonight" tournament, or to the Marshall or Manhattan
for the "insanity" all-nighter that was 12 rounds. Actually got third prize
(open) in the one at the Marshall. My biggest accomplishment back then was
a draw against Asa Hoffman that tied him for first in a quad. The rating I
had was gained against some of the strongest players in America, in several
diverse venues, year-round.

Maybe he wanted a life
other than chess. Seirawan seems a lot more stable mentally than
Fischer.


Fischer seems more principled, though principle seems to be a mental illness
in this society. Yasser was a politician, and a very good one, plus he was
a "street chess" player in that he sharpened his skills in the coffeehouses
of the pacific northwest, or so I'm told.



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Old January 24th 06, 04:30 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc
Rob
 
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Default I may not BE a champion, but I train like one


Ray Gordon wrote:
Is there ANY other player in America who trains full-time at chess, and who
plays with an eye towards long-term improvement rather than winning the next
tournament?


Ray,

Long term improvement is everyones goal. The measure of that can only
be tested on the fields of competition. That seperates true champions
from those who are simply "legends in their own minds". A true warrior
needs to be tested on the field of battle.

Rob

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