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Old February 26th 06, 02:36 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics
 
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Default Palmetto, Florida event draws 2500 paid entries!!

Palmetto, Florida is a smallish tomato packing town located across the
river from Bradenton about 45 miles south of Tampa. Last week it
hosted a bridge tournament (no cash prizes) that drew 2500
participants, the largest in Florida. A chess tournament in this area
would probably draw about 10.

Haas

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Old February 26th 06, 03:22 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics
Ray Gordon
 
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Default Palmetto, Florida event draws 2500 paid entries!!

And of course you would not be at the chess tournament. You just like
to bitch and whine like a pig in heat.

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Old February 26th 06, 10:13 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics
Say No To g4
 
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Default Palmetto, Florida event draws 2500 paid entries!!


wrote in message ups.com...
Palmetto, Florida is a smallish tomato packing town located across the
river from Bradenton about 45 miles south of Tampa. Last week it
hosted a bridge tournament (no cash prizes) that drew 2500
participants, the largest in Florida. A chess tournament in this area
would probably draw about 10.


Yes - bridge draws very well, and without no stinkin' mensa model.


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Old February 27th 06, 03:57 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.bridge
Ange1o DePa1ma
 
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Default Palmetto, Florida event draws 2500 paid entries!!


wrote

Palmetto, Florida is a smallish tomato packing town located across the
river from Bradenton about 45 miles south of Tampa. Last week it
hosted a bridge tournament (no cash prizes) that drew 2500
participants, the largest in Florida. A chess tournament in this area
would probably draw about 10.


30 years ago 2500 wasn't huge for a regional bridge tournament (they last a
whole week). I assume this was a regional. From its location in Outer
Haaslandia they probably ran a Geritol Pairs, Geriatric Geritol Senior
Teams, Seniors with Alzheimer's Individual, Oxygen Tent Teams, and a
Saturday afternoon Deathbed Pairs followed by a Memorial Service Swiss to
commemorate all those who passed away during the week due to the strain of
lifting 13 cards.

It's gotten so bad in bridge that the last big NY area regional did not hold
any evening sessions. The rounds were late morning and mid-afternoon, so
everyone could get back to the nursing home for warm milk and cookies.

A couple of years ago my partner and I headed upstate for a Regional one
gorgeous Autumn Friday afternoon. Halfway up one of us began to worry that
we had mixed up the weekends. Anyway, when we got to the venue we looked
around and were sure there was a bridge tournament just from the "feel" of
the place and the people milling around. So we found a place to have lunch,
went over our convention card, and drove back to the hotel to buy our entry.
Oops! It turns out they were having an AARP convention there (the tournament
was the following week).

When I started playing tournament bridge in 1980 I was 26 years old and the
youngest player at the event. Today, when I attend a rare bridge tournament
I am still the youngest person in the room.

Back in those days it was not uncommon to yell and scream at one's partner.
That was one thing I hated about the game. To its credit, ACBL instituted a
"nice nice" policy, which was a great idea. No cursing, no yelling, no
screaming, no insinuations. Only problem is it's irrelevant today because
everyone in the playing hall is deaf or blind or in a wheelchair (they can't
chase you).

When I was learning I always went for the strongest competition, which back
then was Flight A. Nervy players like me, who were stronger than their
masterpoint totals, could lie about their points and usually get a pretty
decent partner. And the competition was wonderful! If you broke even,
especially with a new partner, you were doing quite well. Today, there are
no Flight A events. Everything is "stratified" which means they throw
everyone together. As a result at pairs you don't encounter anything
resembling a Flight A field except for at certain national events. All it
takes to win an overall prize at a regional today is to play like an old
lady.

Back in the Flight A days everyone who played at that level could recognize
and execute simple squeezes, endplays, and coups. Everyone could count to
13. Today, a finesse is the most intricate play you're likely to encounter
over 26 boards. If you want to play with the field, forget about anything
more involved than that. And don't *ever* jeopardize your contract for an
overtrick, no matter what the odds. In the old days you could be sure 12/13
pairs your way would do so in a normal contract under the right conditions.
Now you just look stupid.



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Old February 27th 06, 10:36 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.bridge
Jürgen R.
 
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Default Palmetto, Florida event draws 2500 paid entries!!

On Sun, 26 Feb 2006 22:57:21 -0500, "Ange1o DePa1ma"
wrote:


wrote

Palmetto, Florida is a smallish tomato packing town located across the
river from Bradenton about 45 miles south of Tampa. Last week it
hosted a bridge tournament (no cash prizes) that drew 2500
participants, the largest in Florida. A chess tournament in this area
would probably draw about 10.


30 years ago 2500 wasn't huge for a regional bridge tournament (they last a
whole week). I assume this was a regional. From its location in Outer
Haaslandia they probably ran a Geritol Pairs, Geriatric Geritol Senior
Teams, Seniors with Alzheimer's Individual, Oxygen Tent Teams, and a
Saturday afternoon Deathbed Pairs followed by a Memorial Service Swiss to
commemorate all those who passed away during the week due to the strain of
lifting 13 cards.

It's gotten so bad in bridge that the last big NY area regional did not hold
any evening sessions. The rounds were late morning and mid-afternoon, so
everyone could get back to the nursing home for warm milk and cookies.

A couple of years ago my partner and I headed upstate for a Regional one
gorgeous Autumn Friday afternoon. Halfway up one of us began to worry that
we had mixed up the weekends. Anyway, when we got to the venue we looked
around and were sure there was a bridge tournament just from the "feel" of
the place and the people milling around. So we found a place to have lunch,
went over our convention card, and drove back to the hotel to buy our entry.
Oops! It turns out they were having an AARP convention there (the tournament
was the following week).

When I started playing tournament bridge in 1980 I was 26 years old and the
youngest player at the event. Today, when I attend a rare bridge tournament
I am still the youngest person in the room.

Back in those days it was not uncommon to yell and scream at one's partner.
That was one thing I hated about the game. To its credit, ACBL instituted a
"nice nice" policy, which was a great idea. No cursing, no yelling, no
screaming, no insinuations. Only problem is it's irrelevant today because
everyone in the playing hall is deaf or blind or in a wheelchair (they can't
chase you).

When I was learning I always went for the strongest competition, which back
then was Flight A. Nervy players like me, who were stronger than their
masterpoint totals, could lie about their points and usually get a pretty
decent partner. And the competition was wonderful! If you broke even,
especially with a new partner, you were doing quite well. Today, there are
no Flight A events. Everything is "stratified" which means they throw
everyone together. As a result at pairs you don't encounter anything
resembling a Flight A field except for at certain national events. All it
takes to win an overall prize at a regional today is to play like an old
lady.

Back in the Flight A days everyone who played at that level could recognize
and execute simple squeezes, endplays, and coups. Everyone could count to
13. Today, a finesse is the most intricate play you're likely to encounter
over 26 boards. If you want to play with the field, forget about anything
more involved than that. And don't *ever* jeopardize your contract for an
overtrick, no matter what the odds. In the old days you could be sure 12/13
pairs your way would do so in a normal contract under the right conditions.
Now you just look stupid.



You should have explained that this comes from the Chess group, where
somebody was lamenting that you can't get even 25 chess players to
come to Palmetto FL.
Your description of the atmosphere at bridge tournaments is
unfortunately accurate. Bridge is dying.
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