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Old July 11th 08, 04:24 AM posted to alt.religion.christian.episcopal,alt.religion.christian.roman-catholic,soc.culture.japan,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.religion.christian
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Default Kayo's Report on the Episcopal Church

My wife, Kayo Kimura, who is from Japan, is a student at Lehman
College. In her English class her assignment was to write a 4-page
report on any subject of her own choosing. We were walking in
Greenwich Village in New York City and she happened to see the
beautiful Grace Church on Broadway and 13th Street. Since this is an
Episcopal Church, she decided to write her report on that.

Even though I was raised in the Episcopal Church, I learned a lot from
her report. I was surprised to learn that there are more than 50
Episcopal Churches in New York City. I was surprised to learn that
more presidents of the United States have been raised in the Episcopal
Church than in any other religion. I was especially surprised to learn
that our current Greatest-of-the-Great President George W. Bush was
raised in the Episcopal Church. This shows you what a great church it
really is.

Kayo just got her grade. She got a B+. She is happy. Here is her
report:

Kayo Kimura
ENW204
FINAL RESEACH PAPER
July 1st, 2008

The Episcopal Church in New York

In the United States, most people are Christian. They may be
Catholic or Protestant. There are more divergences from that point.
Who is interested in the "Episcopal Church in New York"? Homosexual
and bisexual people are considered taboo in the religious world.
However, the Episcopal Church allows such people to join and to
participate in its religious services. For Americans, they may be
interested in the Episcopal Church because this religion originated in
the United States. More presidents of the United States have been
members of Episcopal Church than any other religion. The biggest
church in building size in New York City is an Episcopal Church.
Members of the Episcopal Church tend to be more affluent than members
of other religions in New York.
As a personal view, I am interested in the Episcopal Church
because my husband grew up in this religion. I have an image that they
are more generous than other religions. For example, they let in
homosexual persons and they allow divorces. Therefore, even though I
am a stranger to this country, I feel that the Episcopal Church will
accept me into their group.
Religion is quite vague in the differences between them. What is
the difference between the Catholic and Episcopal churches? What are
the differences with the Baptist Church? What kind of the people are
going to this church? The reality of the Episcopal Church might be
different from my image. That is why I have to research it.

The difference between the Catholic and Episcopal, according to
McIntyre, Ray (2004, April): He answered directly to this question.
These churches have lots in common in their beliefs and behavior.
However, in the details, there are differences.
The differences are in the details, for the most part. These
differences flow from one central issue: Who is in authority? The
Roman Catholic Church has over the centuries steadily increased the
power and prestige of the Pope, the Bishop of Rome. In our day, the
combination of an extraordinarily gifted pope, John Paul II, with
the mass media and globalization, have raised the office of Pope to
its highest level ever. The peripatetic pontiff has traveled far more
than any of his predecessors. When he visits a country, it is to
speak, not to listen, however. His bishops around the world act more
as his prefects than as overseers of the regional Christian community.
St Augustine's famous saying, Roma locuta causa finita est (Rome has
spoken and that settles the matter) has never been more true than
today.
Furthermore, McIntyre discusses issues about Humanæ Vitæ, the
forbidding of birth control by Pope Paul II. These differences are
that of the Catholic versus the Protestant rather than the Catholic
versus Episcopal Church, as all Protestant Denominations allow birth
control, but the Catholic Church does not.
As for the differences with the Baptist Church, there is a
symbolic style. Baptist Church believers tend to carry the Bible
during their services while Episcopalians do not. Both denominations
are Christian and Protestant.
Episcopalians believe in the Apostile's Creed, whereas the
Baptists do not recite it. The Apostile's Creed is as follows:
I BELIEVE in God the Father Almighty,
Maker of heaven and earth:
And in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord:
Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost,
Born of the Virgin Mary:
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, dead, and buried:
He descended into hell;
The third day he rose again from the dead:
He ascended into heaven,
And sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty:
From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Ghost:
The holy Catholic Church;
The Communion of Saints:
The Forgiveness of sins:
The Resurrection of the body,
And the Life everlasting.
Amen.
As to the type of people in the Episcopal Church, unfortunately I did
not have enough time to research it. My hypothesis is white people,
black people, and other kinds of people all believe in the Episcopal
Church. For example, in my neighborhood is St. Edmund Episcopal Church
on 1905 Morris Ave. There must be more black than any other kind of
people there, and there are several more Episcopal churches in the
Bronx. If I had time, I would like to ask the church people about
their religion, and check the type of people.
The Episcopal Church is a broad theme, and I would become bias in
a short time of research because this is a religious matter. As I was
researching it, I found the names of the Baptist Episcopal Church and
the Methodist Episcopal Church. I do not know what these churches are
and this has made me confused.
I would say that I need time for more one month to research it. I
will visit a couple of churches in Manhattan and in my neighborhood in
Bronx. I need to time to read a book about the Church of England,
which is related to the Episcopal Church in historical background, and
several other books. I do not think it will cost much because of the
churches are free.
To research your own religion is like to research your happiness.
I am on a halfway to decide whether the Episcopal Church is my
religion or not. Also, for my friends from my country, I am giving
information about the Episcopal Church and finding the right religion.
I am not saying that the Episcopal Church is best, but at least I
provide a chance for knowledge about the Episcopal Church.

References

McIntyre, Ray (2004, April). Catholicism vs. Anglicanism/
Episcopalianism. Retrieved,
from http://en.allexperts.com/q/Episcopal...opalianism.htm
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Old July 11th 08, 04:53 AM posted to alt.religion.christian.episcopal,alt.religion.christian.roman-catholic,soc.culture.japan,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.religion.christian
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Default Kayo's Report on the Episcopal Church

GOD’S NATURE TO SAVE
The Rev. J. Donald Waring
Grace Church in New York
The Fourth Sunday after Pentecost
June 8, 2008
Jesus said, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those
who are sick. Go
and learn what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice.’ For I
came not to call the
righteous, but sinners.” (Matthew 9:12-13)
What follows is a short fable that a variety of cultures – both east
and west – claim as
their own. Nevertheless, the gist of the tale is usually consistent,
and goes something like this:
Two Franciscan friars were kneeling at a creek washing their cloaks
when one spied a scorpion
clinging to a branch that had fallen into the water. Seeing that the
creature was about to drown,
one of the friars stretched forth his hand to rescue it. The instant
he touched the scorpion, the
little beast thanked the friar by curling its tail and administering a
poisonous, painful sting. The
friar winced and withdrew his hand. A second time he tried to save the
drowning scorpion, only
to receive a second sting. Finally, as he reached his now-swollen hand
for a third attempt, the
other friar said to him, “Brother, why do you have mercy on the
scorpion? It’s nature is only to
sting.” The first friar replied through gritted teeth, “You need not
remind me of the scorpion’s
nature to sting. It is my nature to save, and that is why I have
mercy.”
Jesus said, “Go and learn what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not
sacrifice.” In today’s
reading from the Gospel of Matthew, we’ve heard Jesus quote the
prophet Hosea to the Pharisees
in reference to a man named Matthew, who was a tax collector. Even
though Matthew became
one of the twelve disciples, and has traditionally received credit for
writing one of the four
Gospels, we know next-to-nothing about him as a person. The Gospels of
Mark and Luke tell
much the same story we heard this morning, but use the name Levi in
place of Matthew.
Furthermore, Mark lists Alphaeus as Levi’s father. And we read
elsewhere (Matt. 10:3) that
another disciple named James was also the son of Alphaeus. So Matthew,
also called Levi, was
the son of Alphaeus, and may have had a biological brother among the
twelve. Unfortunately,
none of this information will get you anything except a head full of
Bible trivia.
More useful in learning about Matthew is his occupation: a tax
collector. In the time and
place of Jesus, tax collectors represented an especially despised
group of people. A tax
collector’s nature was to sting. They worked ultimately for the Romans
who occupied the land
and needed revenue to keep the peace, build the roads, and feed the
empire. The Jews hated
paying taxes, not only because they believed it idolatrous to give
tribute to Caesar, but also
because the system was entirely corrupt. In pursuit of taxable items,
a man in Matthew’s
profession could at any time rummage through belongings and strip
search anyone he chose.
Tax collectors could then impose any tax they wanted, few of which had
anything to do with the
Roman government.* Much of it went to line their own pockets. So most
tax collectors
thoroughly deserved the disdain of the people.
We can understand, then, the reaction of the Pharisees when Jesus
called Matthew to
follow, and then went to dine at his house with other tax collectors.
Pharisees, as opposed to tax
collectors, were generally good, respectable men who were deeply
committed to the practice of
the Jewish faith. They worked laboriously to interpret and keep the
Laws of Moses. As such
they represented the epitome of Judaism. So we can perhaps even
sympathize with their
grumbling to the disciples of Jesus: “Why does your teacher eat with
tax collectors and
sinners?” Why does your teacher stretch forth his right hand to help
and defend a scorpion?
Why does this person – this thug – who deliberately disgraces
everything the Jews hold dear
receive the attention of Jesus, rather than those who try to honor
God? Matthew deserved
rejection, not respect. He needed scolding, not counseling. Some would
have said he should be
held under the water, not pulled out of it. When Jesus overheard the
Pharisee’s complaint, what
came to his mind was the prophet Hosea, whom he quoted when he
commanded the Pharisees,
“Go and learn what this means, ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice.’ For
I came not to call the
righteous, but sinners.”
Who was Hosea? Hosea was a prophet from the 8th century BC who came to
understand
his own troubled marriage as a parable for God’s relationship with
Israel. The Old Testament
reading we’ve heard today is a fragment of the much larger story
between Hosea and his wife,
Gomer. The Book of Hosea is a challenge to interpret, but the general
consensus seems to be
that Gomer was a woman out on a limb, about to drown in a life of
prostitution. Hosea was a
respectable man who loved her nonetheless, so he reached out his hand
in marriage. After
bearing Hosea’s three children, Gomer stung. True to her nature, she
committed adultery.
Hosea winced and withdrew his hand. Divorce was the result – a
painful, angry, tearful,
impassioned divorce. Gomer lost everything. Nevertheless, Hosea had
mercy. The Hebrew
word we render as “mercy,” or “steadfast love” is Hesed. Hesed is one
of the most difficult
Biblical words to translate, but it entails “the loyalty manifested by
a stronger party toward
someone who is in a weaker position.”** Hosea could not shake his
hesed, or mercy, or
steadfast love for Gomer, and that love drove him to seek
reconciliation. Hosea reached out his
hand again and restored their home.
Out of the crucible of love and betrayal that was his marriage, Hosea
believed he had
learned something of the intense and agonizing steadfast love that God
must have for his people.
Hosea would write about Israel – down and out, captive in Egypt, backs
to the Red Sea, with
Pharaoh’s chariots and horsemen thundering down on them – as an
unlikely nation to be the
chosen people of God. Yet God stretched forth his right hand to help
and defend them and take
them for his own. God took them in as Hosea himself had taken in
Gomer. God took them in as
the Franciscan reached out for the scorpion. And just as the scorpion
stung the hand that would
save it, just as Gomer had been unfaithful to Hosea, Israel had
strayed again and again from their
covenant relationship with God. Nevertheless, God could not shake his
steadfast love for these
people, and God’s steadfast love would drive him to win them back.
God’s nature is to save,
even while being stung.
It was the same divine steadfast love and mercy that Jesus now focused
squarely on
Matthew the tax collector. When the Pharisees objected, Jesus quoted
Hosea because he wanted
these so-called people of God to remember that they themselves had
been the beneficiaries of the
same divine mercy. It never was their slavish keeping of the law that
made them worthy to stand
before God. It was entirely God’s mercy. They were Gomer. They were
Matthew. Thus, what
utter nonsense it was for them to begrudge the rescue of one like
Matthew. Imagine a
hypothetical scene, if you will: a group of drowning men in a raging
sea are miraculously hauled
aboard a rescue ship. Then when the ship comes upon still others
struggling in the water, those
who have already been saved smugly berate those who are perishing:
“Look at those people:
they don’t know how to swim. They don’t know enough to come out of the
water in a storm.
Why should the captain waste a perfectly good lifeline on the likes of
them?” How quickly they
have forgotten their own rescue, and who accomplished it. Sadly, it
happens all the time – this
amnesia of those already on board. Go and learn what this means, said
Jesus to the Pharisees. I
desire mercy, not sacrifice.
What do you think Jesus hoped the Pharisees would discover when he
commanded them
to go and reacquaint themselves with Hosea? What do you think he hopes
we, today, will
discover? I believe Jesus wanted the Pharisees and wants us to know
the truth of our life and
salvation and very existence. As Paul implies in today’s reading from
Romans (4:13-18), God
has called us into existence out of non-existence. God’s mercy is the
ground of our existence.
But how easily we forget. How easily we conclude that we have somehow
called ourselves into
existence, and made ourselves worthy to stand before God. It just
isn’t true. It’s a delusion.
Jesus wanted the Pharisees and us always to know the truth, because
the truth sets us free. God’s
truth sets us free from the smug superiority of the Pharisees, and it
sets us free to follow Jesus
and begin living now in the kingdom of God.
God’s nature is to save Matthew from his rapacious way, and Gomer from
her life on the
street, and the Pharisees from their inflated spirituality, and you
and me from whatever threatens
to drown us. Go and learn what this means. Many years ago I was
crossing a quiet street, and I
came upon what appeared to be a dead bird lying on the pavement. As I
came closer I saw that it
wasn’t dead, but opening and closing its beak and breathing heavily. I
didn't want to leave it in
the street. But I didn't want to touch it either. It might bite; I
might catch ringworm or mad-cow
disease. Should I risk touching this unclean, common sparrow? Finally
I chose mercy. I bent
over and picked it up and, having never before held a bird, I was
struck by how soft it was. I had
expected it to be prickly, but it was soft and warm. What is more, I
could feel its whole body
throb with every heartbeat. Well, I was hooked, and now I didn't want
just to leave it where
some cat would get it. So while I held the bird in one hand I went to
my car, and with my other
hand I drove home, opened the garage, found a shoe box, and laid the
bird inside. I probably
held the sparrow in my hand for the better part of an hour.
Throughout the remainder of that day the bird’s condition did not seem
to improve. The
next morning I came out to the garage expecting to find a dead bird.
Instead, I looked and saw
that the box was not only empty, but the bird was flying around in the
garage. I opened the doors
but it didn't seem to want to leave. Eventually it just perched on a
window sill and sat there. So
I crept over to it, never expecting it to let me get near. But with
each careful step, I drew closer
and closer until I was within reach. Slowly, I stretched forth my
hand. Then this wild bird, this
ordinary sparrow whose only nature is to protect itself and fly away,
allowed me to take it in my
hand and hold it again. For one miraculous moment it stood in my palm
and we just stared at
each other. I carried it outside, whereupon it flew away.
Did you catch the verse in today’s Psalm (50:11): I know every bird in
the sky, and the
creatures in the fields are in my sight. What doe it mean? It means
that God’s life, God’s love,
and God’s mercy really are the default template of the whole created
order. When Jesus bids us
to come and follow, as he did Matthew, he invites us to step into his
hand that is stretched forth
still, so that we can behold him who saves us, and live in his kingdom
even now.
Jesus said, Go and learn what this means. I desire mercy, not
sacrifice. For I have
come to call not the righteous, but sinners.
+
*Barclay, William. The Master’s Men, 1959
**Anderson, Bernhard W. Understanding the Old Testament, 1986.


http://www.gracechurchnyc.org/pdf/DonJne82008.pdf

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Old July 11th 08, 08:22 AM posted to alt.religion.christian.episcopal,alt.religion.christian.roman-catholic,soc.culture.japan,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.religion.christian
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Default Kayo's Report on the Episcopal Church

Lordy Lord! Do they have grade 1-8 at Lehmann Coolege now?
B+ in 6th grade might be ok. For how many years has this
poor woman been a 'student'?

"samsloan" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
My wife, Kayo Kimura, who is from Japan, is a student at Lehman
College. In her English class her assignment was to write a 4-page
report on any subject of her own choosing. We were walking in
Greenwich Village in New York City and she happened to see the
beautiful Grace Church on Broadway and 13th Street. Since this is an
Episcopal Church, she decided to write her report on that.

Even though I was raised in the Episcopal Church, I learned a lot from
her report. I was surprised to learn that there are more than 50
Episcopal Churches in New York City. I was surprised to learn that
more presidents of the United States have been raised in the Episcopal
Church than in any other religion. I was especially surprised to learn
that our current Greatest-of-the-Great President George W. Bush was
raised in the Episcopal Church. This shows you what a great church it
really is.

Kayo just got her grade. She got a B+. She is happy. Here is her
report:

Kayo Kimura
ENW204
FINAL RESEACH PAPER
July 1st, 2008

The Episcopal Church in New York

In the United States, most people are Christian. They may be
Catholic or Protestant. There are more divergences from that point.
Who is interested in the "Episcopal Church in New York"? Homosexual
and bisexual people are considered taboo in the religious world.
However, the Episcopal Church allows such people to join and to
participate in its religious services. For Americans, they may be
interested in the Episcopal Church because this religion originated in
the United States. More presidents of the United States have been
members of Episcopal Church than any other religion. The biggest
church in building size in New York City is an Episcopal Church.
Members of the Episcopal Church tend to be more affluent than members
of other religions in New York.
As a personal view, I am interested in the Episcopal Church
because my husband grew up in this religion. I have an image that they
are more generous than other religions. For example, they let in
homosexual persons and they allow divorces. Therefore, even though I
am a stranger to this country, I feel that the Episcopal Church will
accept me into their group.
Religion is quite vague in the differences between them. What is
the difference between the Catholic and Episcopal churches? What are
the differences with the Baptist Church? What kind of the people are
going to this church? The reality of the Episcopal Church might be
different from my image. That is why I have to research it.

The difference between the Catholic and Episcopal, according to
McIntyre, Ray (2004, April): He answered directly to this question.
These churches have lots in common in their beliefs and behavior.
However, in the details, there are differences.
The differences are in the details, for the most part. These
differences flow from one central issue: Who is in authority? The
Roman Catholic Church has over the centuries steadily increased the
power and prestige of the Pope, the Bishop of Rome. In our day, the
combination of an extraordinarily gifted pope, John Paul II, with
the mass media and globalization, have raised the office of Pope to
its highest level ever. The peripatetic pontiff has traveled far more
than any of his predecessors. When he visits a country, it is to
speak, not to listen, however. His bishops around the world act more
as his prefects than as overseers of the regional Christian community.
St Augustine's famous saying, Roma locuta causa finita est (Rome has
spoken and that settles the matter) has never been more true than
today.
Furthermore, McIntyre discusses issues about Humanæ Vitæ, the
forbidding of birth control by Pope Paul II. These differences are
that of the Catholic versus the Protestant rather than the Catholic
versus Episcopal Church, as all Protestant Denominations allow birth
control, but the Catholic Church does not.
As for the differences with the Baptist Church, there is a
symbolic style. Baptist Church believers tend to carry the Bible
during their services while Episcopalians do not. Both denominations
are Christian and Protestant.
Episcopalians believe in the Apostile's Creed, whereas the
Baptists do not recite it. The Apostile's Creed is as follows:
I BELIEVE in God the Father Almighty,
Maker of heaven and earth:
And in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord:
Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost,
Born of the Virgin Mary:
Suffered under Pontius Pilate,
Was crucified, dead, and buried:
He descended into hell;
The third day he rose again from the dead:
He ascended into heaven,
And sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty:
From thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Ghost:
The holy Catholic Church;
The Communion of Saints:
The Forgiveness of sins:
The Resurrection of the body,
And the Life everlasting.
Amen.
As to the type of people in the Episcopal Church, unfortunately I did
not have enough time to research it. My hypothesis is white people,
black people, and other kinds of people all believe in the Episcopal
Church. For example, in my neighborhood is St. Edmund Episcopal Church
on 1905 Morris Ave. There must be more black than any other kind of
people there, and there are several more Episcopal churches in the
Bronx. If I had time, I would like to ask the church people about
their religion, and check the type of people.
The Episcopal Church is a broad theme, and I would become bias in
a short time of research because this is a religious matter. As I was
researching it, I found the names of the Baptist Episcopal Church and
the Methodist Episcopal Church. I do not know what these churches are
and this has made me confused.
I would say that I need time for more one month to research it. I
will visit a couple of churches in Manhattan and in my neighborhood in
Bronx. I need to time to read a book about the Church of England,
which is related to the Episcopal Church in historical background, and
several other books. I do not think it will cost much because of the
churches are free.
To research your own religion is like to research your happiness.
I am on a halfway to decide whether the Episcopal Church is my
religion or not. Also, for my friends from my country, I am giving
information about the Episcopal Church and finding the right religion.
I am not saying that the Episcopal Church is best, but at least I
provide a chance for knowledge about the Episcopal Church.

References

McIntyre, Ray (2004, April). Catholicism vs. Anglicanism/
Episcopalianism. Retrieved,
from
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Episcopal...opalianism.htm

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Old July 11th 08, 11:10 AM posted to alt.religion.christian.episcopal,alt.religion.christian.roman-catholic,soc.culture.japan,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.religion.christian
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Default Kayo's Report on the Episcopal Church

On Jul 11, 3:22 am, Jürgen R. wrote:
Lordy Lord! Do they have grade 1-8 at Lehmann Coolege now?
B+ in 6th grade might be ok. For how many years has this
poor woman been a 'student'?


Since this posting went to groups not familiar with Jürgen R., let it
be known that Jürgen R. is an anonymous Internet gadfly in Germany who
thinks it is great fun to attack me and my family all the time.

His attacks are not funny at all. For example, he reported several
times that I was dead.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.g...5?dmode=source

This was widely believed because I was moving at the time and lost my
Internet connection for about two weeks.

Sam Sloan
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Old July 11th 08, 12:59 PM posted to alt.religion.christian.episcopal,alt.religion.christian.roman-catholic,soc.culture.japan,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.religion.christian
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2004
Posts: 668
Default Kayo's Report on the Episcopal Church


"samsloan" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
On Jul 11, 3:22 am, Jürgen R. wrote:
Lordy Lord! Do they have grade 1-8 at Lehmann Coolege now?
B+ in 6th grade might be ok. For how many years has this
poor woman been a 'student'?


Since this posting went to groups not familiar with Jürgen R., let it
be known that Jürgen R. is an anonymous Internet gadfly in Germany who
thinks it is great fun to attack me and my family all the time.


His attacks are not funny at all. For example, he reported several
times that I was dead.


While it isn't generally considered funny when somebody dies,
even if it is Peter Leko, there were many people happy to hear
that Sam Sloan had passed away.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.g...5?dmode=source

This was widely believed because I was moving at the time and lost my
Internet connection for about two weeks.


Sam Sloan


Moving, dead, too broke to pay the phone bill - the effect is the same:
no Sam Sloan, no rgcp.

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