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Old August 16th 03, 11:07 PM
Kevin L. Bachler
 
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Default Was Albert Einstein a hoax?

In article , Sam Sloan says...
SNIP

Articles have been appearing all over the Internet asserting that Albert
Einstein was a hoax. I have always been troubled by the thought that any one
man, regardless of how brilliant or exceptional, could be head and shoulders
above all of the other men of his time.


Like Aristotle? Newton? Galileo?

Naw, can't happen.

Since I have long doubted that Albert Einstein could possibly be the greatest
genius that he is made out to be, I find the theory interesting. I have also
been wondering why Einstein became so famous, whereas other great scientists
remained virtually unknown.

The basic idea is this: Einstein was a poor student, of average
ability.


This statement is false. He did not excel in the German drill and rote
approach. He did well when he transferred to other schools.

He even failed seventh grade math.


Also false. In fact, it is known that Albert showed a talent for math as early
as elementary school, as well as Latin. It is also known that he was befriended
by a medical student, Max Talmey who suggested scientific authors to the young
Einstein, and who helpded teach him mathematics and philosophy as though the
young Einstein were a contemporary.

Albert learned Euclidean geometry at age 12, and even referred to his geometry
text as "holy". It is interesting that geometry plays such a strong role in his
theories.

At the age of 13, he began to study higher math on his own, along with the
writings of Kant. He also spent several years studying the violin. At age 15
he did struggle with Greek -- to such an extent that the teacher once commented
-- in German -- that Albert would never amount to anything. Einstein was high
strung and emotional at 15, and he was so upset about the struggles in Greek
that with the help of his math teacher (who saw a great deal of promise in
Albert) he left Germany to join the rest of his family that had moved to Milan.
There his father Hermann convinced him to enter Zurich Polytechnic, a Swiss
technical college with an international reputation.

Albert was, at 15, 2 years younger than most students taking the entrance exams
for the school.

Albert failed the entrance exam,not passing French, Chemistry, and biology.
However, his scores in mathematics and physics were so high, that Heinrich
Weber, the physics professor, invited Albert to attend his lectures. Albin
Herzog, the principle, noted that since Albert was so young, he would allow him
to enroll the next year, with no exam, so long as he graduated from the high
school of his choice.


There was nothing
exceptional about his ability or accomplishments, until he got a job
as a low level clerk in the patent office in Bern, Switzerland.


Also false. See above.


It was during the period that Albert Einstein worked in the patent
office that he produced the greatest works of genius in the history of
humanity. Does this not strike anybody as strange?

The claim is made that by working in the patent office, Albert
Einstein had access to secret documents submitted by the leading
scientists of his day. Albert Einstein essentially cut and pasted
together these secret documents and published them as his own work.
The scientists could hardly complain, as they had patent applications
pending in his patent office.


Since the theoretical ideas he was dealing with had nothing to do with patents,
that is very unlikely.


Here are a few basic facts:

The Encyclopedia Britannica says of Einstein's early education that he
"showed little scholastic ability." It also says that at the age of
15, "with poor grades in history, geography, and languages, he left
school with no diploma." Einstein himself wrote in a school paper of
his "lack of imagination and practical ability." In 1895, Einstein
failed a simple entrance exam to an engineering school in Zurich. This
exam consisted mainly of mathematical problems, and Einstein showed
himself to be mathematically inept in this exam.


This is known to be false. See above.

Sam publishes so many falsehoods, I can't even continue. A good biography on
Einstein is "Einstein, A Life" by Denis Brian.

Kevin L. Bachler

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Old August 16th 03, 11:57 PM
BEAR
 
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Default Was Albert Einstein a hoax?

Nonsense.

If Einstein couldn't function on this rarefied level in physics, he would have
been exposed long before he was a professor at Princeton. All science builds
upon the work of others.

This is not the first time you've floated this thread, Sam.
What's the point??

_-_-bear

Sam Sloan wrote:

You wrote:

I was in my school's library yesterday and I thought about that story on your website about the possibilty of Einstein being a hoax. I found an aritcle written in German from an Austrian magazine on microfilm from the 1960's talking about the same thing.


My concern is that people talking about an Einstein Hoax are often
anti-Semetic. I am not anti-Semetic at all. However, when I went to
the University of California at Berkeley, I started out as a physics
major. My professor, who was one of the world's leading physicists,
felt that Einstein had not made an important or a significant
contribution to physics. I am influenced by that opinion.


snip




Sam Sloan
http://www.samsloan.com/einstein.htm


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Old August 17th 03, 03:57 AM
NoMoreChess
 
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Default Was Albert Einstein a hoax?

..
A few comments on these attacks on Sam Sloan's bungled query:


My professor, who was one of the world's leading physicists,
felt that Einstein had not made an important or a significant
contribution to physics. I am influenced by that opinion.



What on Earth is one of the world's leading physicists doing, earning a
paltry few dollars as a teacher, hmmm? Why doesn't he "discover" something,
and write a best-selling book instead?



Since California doesn't hire Physicists or Scientists,



Nonsense. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is in California, and the
astronomers they originally hired kept trying to convert the particle
accelerator into some kind of preposterous telescope, so they had to be let go.



I have always been troubled by the thought that any one man, regardless of
how brilliant or exceptional, could be head and shoulders above all of the
other men of his time.



Sam is, of course, talking about Robert Wadlow (8' 11" tall), who WAS
head-and-shoulders above other men of his time.


Since I have long doubted that Albert Einstein could possibly be the
greatest genius that he is made out to be, I find the theory interesting.




Well, you should doubt that. Since if you ever read any of
*Einstein's* writings, you would know what his opinion was of
mathematicians and their genius theories.



I once read one of his books, and he said nothing in it about genius theories
of mathematicians, just a lot of nonsense about time somehow being "relative."
A real crack-up, this guy! It was all done deadpan, as if he were trying to
make it look like serious, scientific stuff.



I have also been wondering why Einstein became so famous, whereas other

great scientists remained virtually unknown.



You've got to have a good PR-man! It's no good to be a genius, if the PR is
not done properly, for you do all the work, but somebody else gets the credit.




It was during the period that Albert Einstein worked in the patent
office that he produced the greatest works of genius in the history of
humanity. Does this not strike anybody as strange?



Yes.


No. Since if you read any history, you would have noticed
that Einstein was a *Swiss* Patent clerk, not a
German Patent clerk.



So...he could only steal great ideas regarding the making of fine watches?


The Encyclopedia Britannica says



That's "Encyclopaedia."


But the Encyclopedia Britannica says a lot of things --
like the British understand English.



I have seen a webpage devoted to the historical errors of this fine
publication. That page was created by the Encyclopaedia's own people, who
readily admitted their (relatively few) mistakes, and even poke fun at them.
At one time, I owned an encyclopedia CD-ROM of some far lesser, American
brand. It contained so many gross inaccuracies and misrepresentations in the
area of "chess" alone, that I was forced to get rid of it (or turn it into a
coaster on which to set my glass)! It wasn't worth the plastic it was
"printed" on.
Thank god no trees were killed in vain.



No less an authority than Stephen Hawking has said that
none of the works of Einstein wer original.



Wait for the ad hominem attack...


But Hawking only says that, since he's a Time Theorist,
and believes that Time exists, unlike Einstein.



This has nothing to do with whether or not Einstein's works were "original."



Hawking provides a list of names of scientists, all of whom
are unknown to the general public today, but who had the ideas now
associated with Einstein before Einstein had them.



A plagiarist? Well, at least we don't have to worry about that sort of
thing ever happenning in chess. Hahahaha!



After he died, the brain of Albert Einstein was taken out, preserved
and studied. It is still in a glass jar somewhere. Scientists who have
studied the brain say that it appears to be an average brain, no
different from many others.



I have read somewhere that Einstein's brain was actually quite diffferent,
in that there was a much deeper groove dividing the brain in half,
front-to-back.
What was not unordinary, was the overall size of his brain.



Examination of the original hand written papers of
Albert Einstein might provide clues as to whether he wrote them or
merely copied them.



No. What such an examination would show is whether the papers being examined
were the first rough-draft, or some revised and corrected version.
The way to tell if his text was copied from someone else, is to compare it to
the relevant previous writings by others, word for word.


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Old August 18th 03, 05:00 AM
NoMoreChess
 
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Default Was Albert Einstein a hoax?

..
too stupid to have an opinion on the subject that
matters. The real problem is that people like that exist in places
where it matters to things other than science. Take the president, for
example.



I think you might "misunderestimate" him.

Now Clinton -- there was a hoax!






bashing science gives them the aura of mystique among the
astrology/phony intellectual crowd.



"Misunfortunately," the phony-intellectual crowd is much more widespead than
the above would seem to imply ("astrology").





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Old August 19th 03, 10:35 AM
Bob the Younger
 
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Default Was Albert Einstein a hoax?

What's this got to do with Go? Or chess? Or the Roman Catholic Church?

"Sam Sloan" wrote in message
...
You wrote:

I was in my school's library yesterday and I thought about that story on

your website about the possibilty of Einstein being a hoax. I found an
aritcle written in German from an Austrian magazine on microfilm from the
1960's talking about the same thing.


[snip a whole pile of hearsay]


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