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Old September 29th 09, 04:40 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Wall Street Journal on K-K speed match

On Sep 28, 9:50*pm, " wrote:
OLD KINGS, NEW GAME

Karpov vs. Kasparov grudge match in Valencia, Spain.

http://tinyurl.com/ydwyxxh


Not a bad article, but creeping in, as often with newspaper articles
by mainstream journalists, is the usual assortment of minor factual
errors:

"In 1920, a more accomplished amateur—Lenin—founded the Soviet Chess
School ..." — I suppose Lenin might have signed off on the idea, but
AFAIK most of the credit belongs to Ilyin-Zhenevsky.

"Mikhail Botvinnik ... to a large extent he established the nature
of the modern game." — This is like saying Willi Messerschmidt
invented the airplane. I'd give much more credit to Alekhine on this
one.

"[By] 1948 ... Gone was the swashbuckling improvisation of the 19th
century, when men like Adolf Anderssen and Paul Morphy took their
opponents apart with dashing tactical flair." — The "swashbuckling"
style was pretty much gone by the late 1800s, let alone by 1948.

"When Mr. Fischer took on Boris Spassky in the 1972 World
Championship ... he became the first non-Soviet challenger in a
quarter of a century." — A "quarter of a century" would take us back
to 1947. Last I checked, there were two non-Soviets at Hague-Moscow
1948, Reshevsky and Euwe.

"Messrs. Spassky and Fischer were reluctant, unlikely Cold
Warriors." — One could say that of Spassky, but of Fischer? He loved
beating "commie cheaters."

"But suddenly [in the WCh 1972 match] Mr. Fischer started playing
things he had never played before, such as Alekhine's Defense." —
Seldom, but not "never." Fischer had played Alekhine's Defense at
least five times before the Spassky match: vs. Ciocaltea at Havana
1965, vs. Browne at Rovinj-Zagreb 1970, and against Minic, Ujtumen and
Suttles in the 1970 Interzonal.
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Old September 29th 09, 08:43 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Wall Street Journal on K-K speed match

On Sep 29, 8:40*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:
On Sep 28, 9:50*pm, " wrote:

OLD KINGS, NEW GAME


Karpov vs. Kasparov grudge match in Valencia, Spain.


http://tinyurl.com/ydwyxxh


* Not a bad article, but creeping in, as often with newspaper articles
by mainstream journalists, is the usual assortment of minor factual
errors:

* "In 1920, a more accomplished amateur—Lenin—founded the Soviet Chess
School ..." — I suppose Lenin might have signed off on the idea, but
AFAIK most of the credit belongs to Ilyin-Zhenevsky.


Oh, no!, while Lenin was perhaps of a master strength,
he was against chess! He considered chess to be a
distraction. He didn't act upon his view in this case
but certainly he did nothing to promote chess.


* "Mikhail Botvinnik ... to a large extent he established the nature
of the modern game." — This is like saying Willi Messerschmidt
invented the airplane. I'd give much more credit to Alekhine on this
one.


This was my thought too. However, the so called
scientific approach was an evolutionary beast.
What about Stenitz, Zukertort, Tarrash, Rubinstein,
Nimzovitz, Reti, ...? And all strong masters were
studying the game and inventing to a degree. So,
it is a question of degree, and I second your view
that it was Alekhine who was the first to intensively
study all aspects of the chess knowledge and
competition (opponents), while for instance Rubinstein
studied mostly chess as such, perhaps disregarding
a long preparation against a specific opponent, one
after another (but I don't know for sure).

Botvinnik was just Alekhine minus vodka.

* "[By] 1948 ... Gone was the swashbuckling improvisation of the 19th
century, when men like Adolf Anderssen and Paul Morphy took their
opponents apart with dashing tactical flair." — The "swashbuckling"
style was pretty much gone by the late 1800s, let alone by 1948.


Actually, Morphy did study the game seriously.

Regards,

Wlod
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Old September 30th 09, 12:24 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Wall Street Journal on K-K speed match

On Sep 29, 11:40*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

http://tinyurl.com/ydwyxxh


* Not a bad article, but creeping in, as often with newspaper articles
by mainstream journalists, is the usual assortment of minor factual
errors:

* "In 1920, a more accomplished amateur—Lenin—founded the Soviet Chess
School ..." — I suppose Lenin might have signed off on the idea, but
AFAIK most of the credit belongs to Ilyin-Zhenevsky.

* "Mikhail Botvinnik ... to a large extent he established the nature
of the modern game." — This is like saying Willi Messerschmidt
invented the airplane. I'd give much more credit to Alekhine on this
one.



If you read the description carefully, it sounds as
though a passage referring to Mr. Steinitz has been
"lifted", with Mr. Botvinnik's name "dropped" in his
place.


* "[By] 1948 ... Gone was the swashbuckling improvisation of the 19th
century, when men like Adolf Anderssen and Paul Morphy took their
opponents apart with dashing tactical flair." — The "swashbuckling"
style was pretty much gone by the late 1800s, let alone by 1948.



Nonsense; Mikhail Tal made all those other guys
look like careful strategic planners; his swash out-
buckled them, his sacrifices outnumbered theirs,
and his dash out-flaired them all. Besides, PM's
play was basically rock-solid, apart from his odds
games.


* "When Mr. Fischer took on Boris Spassky in the 1972 World
Championship ... he became the first non-Soviet challenger in a
quarter of a century." — A "quarter of a century" would take us back
to 1947. Last I checked, there were two non-Soviets at Hague-Moscow
1948, Reshevsky and Euwe.



Sorry-- Edward Winter has already locked-up
the petty pedantry trophy for 2008-2009 C.E.


* "Messrs. Spassky and Fischer were reluctant, unlikely Cold
Warriors." — One could say that of Spassky, but of Fischer? He loved
beating "commie cheaters."



In the "story" of this article, the Cold War was
basically fought in a single match, in 1972. It
was BF who had to be dragged to Iceland, whose
every whim had to be satisfied if the match were
to even take place. So then, where can one find
Mr. Spassky's reluctance? In his reluctance to
claim what was rightfully his -- a forfeit win -- not
once, but twice.


* "But suddenly [in the WCh 1972 match] Mr. Fischer started playing
things he had never played before, such as Alekhine's Defense." —
Seldom, but not "never." Fischer had played Alekhine's Defense at
least five times before the Spassky match: vs. Ciocaltea at Havana
1965, vs. Browne at Rovinj-Zagreb 1970, and against Minic, Ujtumen and
Suttles in the 1970 Interzonal.



Bizarre. It is almost as if BF "knew" he was
going to qualify, and was deliberately avoiding
giving away anything regarding his preparation
for the matches to follow ( I mean the /real/
preparation).

What I've noticed in the outpourings from what
have been called mainstream journalists is not
so much a problem with minor factual errors, as
it is a very shallow "understanding" of the history
of chess-- papered over by the pretension of
having a deep and authorotative understanding.


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