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Old November 7th 09, 02:14 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 3,026
Default Anand from 84 to 2009 is 7I7 wins and 233 loses & 940 draws

ON TOP OF THE WORLD

Also I saw a pic of him playing Kasparov in the I995 Championship
games. They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof overlooking New York. That is a cool pic and place to play.
-- SAT W-7

THIS CRAZY WORLD OF CHESS by GM Larry Evans

When the World Trade Center went down in 2001, it was a grim reminder
of the Kasparov-Anand match for the PCA World Championship held there
in 1995. An instant book aptly titled "On Top of the Chess World"
omitted such basic information as a round-by-round scoretable.

FIDE got no cut of the prize money and did not recognize the victor as
world champion. The $1.5 million duel, sponsored by Intel, began with
a record string of eight draws as tension mounted in this best-of-20
series.

"We both basically agreed with each other that we didnít have a clue
what was going on," said Anand, who accepted a draw in game six during
a complex battle after only 28 moves. Their games werenít dull, just
abandoned too soon. Fans who made a special trip to New York and
bought tickets felt cheated.

The 1966 Petrosian-Spassky match began with six straight draws. "When
am I ever going to win a game?" moaned challenger Spassky. "Lose one
first," quipped savvy ex-champ Botvinnik, who figured it would either
demoralize Spassky or "stir the passion that whips the blood" (as
Emanuel Lasker put it). Petrosian defended his title in that match but
lost it to Spassky three years later.

Gary Kasparov, then 32, was the first to lose a game (#9) against
challenger Vishy Anand, then 25. Kasparov heeded this wake-up call
with a dazzling victory in game 10 to even the score at 5-5 at the
halfway mark. Since Kasparov would keep his title on a tie, each draw
now nudged him closer to victory.

Game 11 was the turning point that quashed Anandís dreams of glory.
Kasparov surprised him by adopting the Dragon Variation of the
Sicilian Defense for the first time. Anand refused a draw after move
19 nd gained an advantage before going astray. The outcome of the
match never was in doubt after this fiasco. Kasparov surged ahead with
10Ĺ-7Ĺ and the last four games were drawn without much fight. The
average length of all 18 games was fewer than 30 moves!

Ten years later, at 42, Kasparov retired from tournament chess to
enter Russiaís risky political arena. He is arguably the greatest
player in history and itís unlikely that his phenomenal record ever
will be surpassed.






SAT W-7 wrote:
2,356 games .....

Also i saw a pic of him playing Kasporov in the I995 Championship
games . They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof over looking New York.. That is a cool pic and place to
play.....

anyone know Topolovs record ?

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Old November 8th 09, 04:07 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 9,302
Default Anand from 84 to 2009 is 7I7 wins and 233 loses & 940 draws

On Nov 7, 9:14*am, " wrote:

When the World Trade Center went down in 2001, it was a grim reminder
of the Kasparov-Anand match for the PCA World Championship held there
in 1995. An instant book aptly titled "On Top of the Chess World"
omitted such basic information as a round-by-round scoretable.



Rigid, formulaic thinking.


FIDE got no cut of the prize money and did not recognize the victor as
world champion. The $1.5 million duel, sponsored by Intel, began with
a record string of eight draws as tension mounted in this best-of-20
series.



Were GK's dictated conditions more or less un-
fair than say, those given to AK by FIDE in 1978?


"We both basically agreed with each other that we didnít have a clue
what was going on," said Anand, who accepted a draw in game six during
a complex battle after only 28 moves. Their games werenít dull, just
abandoned too soon. Fans who made a special trip to New York and
bought tickets felt cheated.



When I last visited NYC, my three chess-playing
companions each had some pizza, purchased very
near to the Manhattan Chess Club from an all-night
pizza parlor; they each seem to have overlooked
the flies "hanging out" on their food in that strange
city, and one soon had to enter hospital for a good
stomach-pumping. I, of course, spotted the danger
and "avioded" this common mistake (although I did
go hungry for a while).


Gary Kasparov, then 32, was the first to lose a game (#9) against
challenger Vishy Anand, then 25. Kasparov heeded this wake-up call
with a dazzling victory in game 10 to even the score at 5-5 at the
halfway mark. Since Kasparov would keep his title on a tie



Deja vu.


each draw now nudged him closer to victory.



Perhaps then, draws should not count.


Game 11 was the turning point that quashed Anandís dreams of glory.
Kasparov surprised him by adopting the Dragon Variation of the
Sicilian Defense for the first time.



Ten years later, at 42, Kasparov retired from tournament chess to
enter Russiaís risky political arena. He is arguably the greatest
player in history



Funny, isn't it, how some people flip and flop
about on the matter of who was the greatest
player in history-- not unlike a fish out of water.


and itís unlikely that his phenomenal record ever
will be surpassed.



You failed to specify which "record" you are
blathering about here. I always was impressed
most by GK's record-setting ego-- and by his
unmatched hubris; but he also was the first to
break the 2800 barrier, so to speak, and the
last to decimate a powerful chess computer in
a serious chess match, in brilliant style.

I believe Mr. Kasparov may go down in history
as the man who failed in his attempts to set up
some new power-center in chess-- and thereby
take down the FIDE, once and for all. It is very
likely that his successes in other realms -- say,
cheating, lying, hating, and becoming a mem-
ber of the communist party -- will soon be all but
forgotten.

And of course Mr. SAT W-7 will without a doubt
go down in history as the one person who didn't
know about the fate of the WTC towers in NYC;
his chess play will likely be forgotten-- even his
wins over the GetClub engine. Such is life.


-- help bot


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Old November 8th 09, 06:46 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,977
Default Anand from 84 to 2009 is 7I7 wins and 233 loses & 940 draws

On Nov 7, 8:07*pm, help bot wrote:

*And of course Mr. SAT W-7 will without a doubt
go down in history as the one person who didn't
know about the fate of the WTC towers in NYC;


But what a Great American Jingoist he is!

Wlod
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Old November 8th 09, 02:16 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 3,026
Default Anand from 84 to 2009 is 7I7 wins and 233 loses & 940 draws

WORST TITLE MATCH?

In my opinion this was the worst-EVER match for the world
championship. Anand won one game, game 9, but was annihilated over the
next 5 games and totally gave up in the most lily-livered way. A
disaster for Anand, who rook a long time to recover. A disaster for
Kasparov - the PCA was his idea and he wanted the match to be more
entertaining than FID… matches. A disaster for chess, as the first 8
games were drawn and provoked the usual Letterman-style jokes about
chess being boring. -- Offramp

In my opinion the Kramnik-Kasparov match at London in 1990 was even
worse than the Anand-Kasparov match in 1995. Kasparov was
unrecognizable and failed to post a single win out of 15 games. Even
worse, when behind and needing desperately to catch up, he agreed to
quick draws with white.



wrote:
ON TOP OF THE WORLD

Also I saw a pic of him playing Kasparov in the I995 Championship
games. They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof overlooking New York. That is a cool pic and place to play.
-- SAT W-7

THIS CRAZY WORLD OF CHESS by GM Larry Evans

When the World Trade Center went down in 2001, it was a grim reminder
of the Kasparov-Anand match for the PCA World Championship held there
in 1995. An instant book aptly titled "On Top of the Chess World"
omitted such basic information as a round-by-round scoretable.

FIDE got no cut of the prize money and did not recognize the victor as
world champion. The $1.5 million duel, sponsored by Intel, began with
a record string of eight draws as tension mounted in this best-of-20
series.

"We both basically agreed with each other that we didnít have a clue
what was going on," said Anand, who accepted a draw in game six during
a complex battle after only 28 moves. Their games werenít dull, just
abandoned too soon. Fans who made a special trip to New York and
bought tickets felt cheated.

The 1966 Petrosian-Spassky match began with six straight draws. "When
am I ever going to win a game?" moaned challenger Spassky. "Lose one
first," quipped savvy ex-champ Botvinnik, who figured it would either
demoralize Spassky or "stir the passion that whips the blood" (as
Emanuel Lasker put it). Petrosian defended his title in that match but
lost it to Spassky three years later.

Gary Kasparov, then 32, was the first to lose a game (#9) against
challenger Vishy Anand, then 25. Kasparov heeded this wake-up call
with a dazzling victory in game 10 to even the score at 5-5 at the
halfway mark. Since Kasparov would keep his title on a tie, each draw
now nudged him closer to victory.

Game 11 was the turning point that quashed Anandís dreams of glory.
Kasparov surprised him by adopting the Dragon Variation of the
Sicilian Defense for the first time. Anand refused a draw after move
19 nd gained an advantage before going astray. The outcome of the
match never was in doubt after this fiasco. Kasparov surged ahead with
10Ĺ-7Ĺ and the last four games were drawn without much fight. The
average length of all 18 games was fewer than 30 moves!

Ten years later, at 42, Kasparov retired from tournament chess to
enter Russiaís risky political arena. He is arguably the greatest
player in history and itís unlikely that his phenomenal record ever
will be surpassed.






SAT W-7 wrote:
2,356 games .....

Also i saw a pic of him playing Kasporov in the I995 Championship
games . They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof over looking New York.. That is a cool pic and place to
play.....

anyone know Topolovs record ?

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Old November 8th 09, 02:18 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 3,026
Default Anand from 84 to 2009 is 7I7 wins and 233 loses & 940 draws

CORRECTION

Of course the Kramnik-Kasparov match was in 2000 (not 1990).


wrote:
WORST TITLE MATCH?

In my opinion this was the worst-EVER match for the world
championship. Anand won one game, game 9, but was annihilated over the
next 5 games and totally gave up in the most lily-livered way. A
disaster for Anand, who rook a long time to recover. A disaster for
Kasparov - the PCA was his idea and he wanted the match to be more
entertaining than FID… matches. A disaster for chess, as the first 8
games were drawn and provoked the usual Letterman-style jokes about
chess being boring. -- Offramp

In my opinion the Kramnik-Kasparov match at London in 1990 was even
worse than the Anand-Kasparov match in 1995. Kasparov was
unrecognizable and failed to post a single win out of 15 games. Even
worse, when behind and needing desperately to catch up, he agreed to
quick draws with white.



wrote:
ON TOP OF THE WORLD

Also I saw a pic of him playing Kasparov in the I995 Championship
games. They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof overlooking New York. That is a cool pic and place to play.
-- SAT W-7

THIS CRAZY WORLD OF CHESS by GM Larry Evans

When the World Trade Center went down in 2001, it was a grim reminder
of the Kasparov-Anand match for the PCA World Championship held there
in 1995. An instant book aptly titled "On Top of the Chess World"
omitted such basic information as a round-by-round scoretable.

FIDE got no cut of the prize money and did not recognize the victor as
world champion. The $1.5 million duel, sponsored by Intel, began with
a record string of eight draws as tension mounted in this best-of-20
series.

"We both basically agreed with each other that we didnít have a clue
what was going on," said Anand, who accepted a draw in game six during
a complex battle after only 28 moves. Their games werenít dull, just
abandoned too soon. Fans who made a special trip to New York and
bought tickets felt cheated.

The 1966 Petrosian-Spassky match began with six straight draws. "When
am I ever going to win a game?" moaned challenger Spassky. "Lose one
first," quipped savvy ex-champ Botvinnik, who figured it would either
demoralize Spassky or "stir the passion that whips the blood" (as
Emanuel Lasker put it). Petrosian defended his title in that match but
lost it to Spassky three years later.

Gary Kasparov, then 32, was the first to lose a game (#9) against
challenger Vishy Anand, then 25. Kasparov heeded this wake-up call
with a dazzling victory in game 10 to even the score at 5-5 at the
halfway mark. Since Kasparov would keep his title on a tie, each draw
now nudged him closer to victory.

Game 11 was the turning point that quashed Anandís dreams of glory.
Kasparov surprised him by adopting the Dragon Variation of the
Sicilian Defense for the first time. Anand refused a draw after move
19 nd gained an advantage before going astray. The outcome of the
match never was in doubt after this fiasco. Kasparov surged ahead with
10Ĺ-7Ĺ and the last four games were drawn without much fight. The
average length of all 18 games was fewer than 30 moves!

Ten years later, at 42, Kasparov retired from tournament chess to
enter Russiaís risky political arena. He is arguably the greatest
player in history and itís unlikely that his phenomenal record ever
will be surpassed.






SAT W-7 wrote:
2,356 games .....

Also i saw a pic of him playing Kasporov in the I995 Championship
games . They played on top of the World Trade Center I07 floors up on
the roof over looking New York.. That is a cool pic and place to
play.....

anyone know Topolovs record ?

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