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Old December 19th 09, 12:15 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

samsloan wrote:

False comparison, Sam. I do not write opening manuals. I'd never
even presume to try. My chess writing has consisted mainly of book
reviews, historical articles, and tournament reports.
A weak player writing an opening manual is like a blind man trying
to paint.


I disagree. I think that a majority of all chess opening books are
written by weak players.

Here is an example: In the 1960s the best opening books were written
by Rolf Schwartz. His book on the Sicilian Defense was the Bible of
that opening. Every serious player had to have it.

http://www.amazon.com/HANDBUCH-SCHAC...dp/B002A43FZQ/

However, he was a weak player, at best Class B, or so I was told.

I think that most opening book authors wisely avoid playing in rated
tournamenmts so we do not know their actual strength.

Sam Sloan


It is pointless to correct the nonsense that Slink spews forth,
nevertheless:

1) The Schwarz (not Schwartz) books were published by the dominant German
chess publisher Kurt Rattmann. These books were valuable mainly as
source material: Schwarz was a schoolteacher and a pedant; he
collected opening variations like others collect stamps or beetles
and in his books generally consist of complete games sorted according
to variation. He discusses the ideas of the openings and doesn't
pretend to analyze deeply.

2) Schwarz is an IM at correspondence chess.

3) A curious fact: The best-selling Schwarz volume was on 1. f2-f4.

4) Slink claims most opening books are written by weak players.
This is certainly not true of the opening books that are widely
distributed. Before the Informant and the databases the standard
opening book series was written by Euwe. Euwe's collection was
continued by Ludek Pachman, who had earlier written
a 4-volume book on openings. The other important series
was authored by Suetin, Keres, Boleslavsky, Taimanov.

I don't know if any of these books were translated into
English, nor what was current in the U.S. at the time when
these books were important. If you wanted to follow the
development of opening variations in the 50's and
60's, and probably still in the 80's, you had to learn
enough Russian to read 'Shakhmaty' and enough German
to read Euwe's loose-leaf periodical.

You can find most of this information by googling for
10 minutes, even though Slink can't.


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Old December 19th 09, 01:58 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 16, 1:40*pm, sd wrote:
Why reprint a book when it can be had for free as an e-book:

http://www.chessville.com/downloads/ebooks.htm

A free version of CB on any computer will read the files nicely, and
the text - or most of it - appears to be contained within as well,
unlike many CB e-books.

It would be easier to approve of Sam's copying if he added significant
new material (not just an new Introduction or Foreword, by way of
which he thinks he is getting away with something) or perhaps trying
to reprint all three major Grob books with a concordance. Or updating
it based on the others. Just annofritzing Bloodgood's analysis could
prove interesting, but no, Sam just wants to photocopy someone else's
work and sell it as his own. If his plagiarism was a bit more
creative, it might be tolerable.


I could have pointed it but I think we all went through this before
with another, I Am Photocopying A Book and Selling It episode

The Tactical Grob would actually be more useful if it were updated
into say, short-algebraic - and better diagrams offered. As for the
Sutton Coalfield address, that was the HQ of the British Chess
Federation. I used to have a copy of Grob's book while in England. I
don't know if it has any advantages over Basman's title - I don't
think so.

Phil Innes

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Old December 19th 09, 02:00 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.true-crime
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 12, 6:09*pm, madams wrote:
Taylor Kingston wrote:

.

* A relevant quote from George Saville, Marquis of Halifax
(1633-1695):


* "Men are not hanged for stealing horses, but that horses may not be
stolen."


How about: "Men are not hanged for stealing bread, hanging is so much
more humane than starvation" - Lord Cumalotte...

m.


I think the only crime that is completely safe to release a prisoner
for is suicide.

Phil Innes
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Old December 19th 09, 03:30 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 18, 5:46*pm, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

* A weak player writing an opening manual is like a blind man trying
to paint.


I love Sam Loyd's put down of another problemist as like a 'rook odds
player trying to annotate a game by Steinitz.' Or words to that
effect.

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Old December 19th 09, 03:46 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

ChessFire wrote:
[...] As for the
Sutton Coalfield address, that was the HQ of the British Chess
Federation.


Erm, no. "Chess, Sutton Coldfield, Sufficient Address" was
the address of B. H. Wood's magazine and business. Nothing to do
with the BCF [now ECF], which is now based near Hastings but used
not to have a proper "home" -- I think it was wherever the secretary
lived and kept the filing cabinet.

--
Andy Walker
Nottingham


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Old December 19th 09, 03:50 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 19, 9:46*am, Andy Walker wrote:
ChessFire wrote:
[...] As for the
Sutton Coalfield address, that was the HQ of the British Chess
Federation.


* * * * Erm, no. *"Chess, Sutton Coldfield, Sufficient Address" was
the address of B. H. Wood's magazine and business. *Nothing to do
with the BCF [now ECF], which is now based near Hastings but used
not to have a proper "home" -- I think it was wherever the secretary
lived and kept the filing cabinet.

--
Andy Walker
Nottingham


Are you impying that ChessFarte was talking out of his ass again?
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Old December 19th 09, 03:53 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 19, 9:46*am, Andy Walker wrote:
ChessFire wrote:
[...] As for the
Sutton Coalfield address, that was the HQ of the British Chess
Federation.


* * * * Erm, no. *"Chess, Sutton Coldfield, Sufficient Address" was
the address of B. H. Wood's magazine and business. *Nothing to do
with the BCF [now ECF], which is now based near Hastings but used
not to have a proper "home" -- I think it was wherever the secretary
lived and kept the filing cabinet.

--
Andy Walker
Nottingham


Ha! Yes, of course you are right. & Probably the BCF's bookshop was
also wherever PH Clarke was. I think that's where my copy of
Bloodgood's title came from, together of course with the MCO edited by
Walter Korn, and my Sokolski title, written by Sokolski.

When I interviewed Michael Adams a few years ago he said 'you know,
I'm studying this really old book written in descriptive notation',
and I didn't say anything since at the time of buying my first chess
books algebraic notation hadn't been invented. At least I never saw it
deployed anywhere.

Does anyone actually know who originated and popularized it?

Phil Innes
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Old December 19th 09, 04:21 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 18, 8:15*pm, samsloan wrote:

I think that a majority of all chess opening books are
written by weak players.


Utter nonsense. Checking the opening manuals on my shelf, I see such
authors as GM Reuben Fine, GM Svetozar Gligoric, GM Mark Taimanov, GM
Alexander Matanovic, GM Tony Miles, GM Lev Alburt, GM Nick DeFirmian,
GM Roman Dzindzichashvili, GM John Nunn, GM Raymond Keene, GM Larry
Evans, GM Andrew Soltis, GM Glenn Flear, GM Eduard Gufeld, GM Bruno
Parma, GM Karsten Müller, GM Joe Gallagher, and ICCF World Champion
Hans Berliner. Not to mention IMs Silman, Donaldson, Pein, Lane,
Bellin, Hartston, Minev, Horowitz, Levy, Mednis, Grefe, Perelshteyn.
Also "Lasker's Manual of Chess" and Steinitz's "Modern Chess
Instructor" devote many pages to openings.
That's just books I own personally. Other authors of opening books:
Kasparov, Karpov, Petrosian, Euwe — you've heard of them, I presume,
Sam?

I think that most opening book authors wisely avoid playing in rated
tournamenmts so we do not know their actual strength.


Riiight. That's how all those World Champions, GM and IMs I named
got their titles, by avoiding rated tournaments.

Seriously, Sam: Do you ever actually think before you write? Or are
you just some sort of random verbiage generator?
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Old December 19th 09, 04:24 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 19, 7:58*am, ChessFire wrote:
On Dec 16, 1:40*pm, sd wrote:



Why reprint a book when it can be had for free as an e-book:


http://www.chessville.com/downloads/ebooks.htm


A free version of CB on any computer will read the files nicely, and
the text - or most of it - appears to be contained within as well,
unlike many CB e-books.


It would be easier to approve of Sam's copying if he added significant
new material (not just an new Introduction or Foreword, by way of
which he thinks he is getting away with something) or perhaps trying
to reprint all three major Grob books with a concordance. Or updating
it based on the others. Just annofritzing Bloodgood's analysis could
prove interesting, but no, Sam just wants to photocopy someone else's
work and sell it as his own. If his plagiarism was a bit more
creative, it might be tolerable.


I could have pointed it but I think we all went through this before
with another, I Am Photocopying A Book and Selling It episode

The Tactical Grob would actually be more useful if it were updated
into say, short-algebraic - and better diagrams offered. As for the
Sutton Coalfield address, that was the HQ of the British Chess
Federation. I used to have a copy of Grob's book while in England. I
don't know if it has any advantages over Basman's title - I don't
think so.

Phil Innes


My books are not photocopies. They are very high resolution 600 dpi
scans. They usually look better than the original, as they are then
cleaned.

It was suggested that I enhance the book by adding my own games with
the Grob plus Fritz analysis. I have rejected that I idea because the
importance to the Bloodgood is that it is by Bloodgood. I will not
pollute it with anybody else's stuff.

I cannot improve on the diagrams in the book because they are very
high quality. What is amazing is that the book was written while
Bloodgood was in prison on Death Row. B. H. Wood must have done
substantial work on it, just re-typing and setting it and creating the
diagrams.

Was the full name of B. H. Wood Baruch H. Wood?

How strong was he as a chess player? By the way, I played him once.

Sam Sloan
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Old December 19th 09, 06:05 PM posted to rec.games.chess.analysis,rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics,alt.chess,rec.games.chess.computer
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Default I am reprinting "The Tactical Grob" by Claude Bloodgood

On Dec 19, 10:21*am, Taylor Kingston
wrote:

Seriously, Sam: Do you ever actually think before you write? Or are
you just some sort of random verbiage generator?--TK

What else would you expect from someone whose chess library is
apparently 20 or 30 books by Eric Schiller?

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