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Old February 19th 10, 10:37 PM posted to soc.culture.filipino,soc.culture.spain,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics,soc.culture.usa
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Default Conqueror of The Seas The Story of Magellan

Conqueror of The Seas
The Story of Magellan
by Stefan Zweig

Ferdinand Magellan was the first man ever to sail around the world.
His voyage was financed 75% by the King of Spain, Charles V, The Holy
Roman Emperor, and 25% by Christopher de Haro, a Dutch businessman
residing in Spain. The purpose of the trip by Magellan was not Gold,
Glory and God, as is commonly believed. Rather, it was for better
food, as the basic spices commonly available today, including pepper,
cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and mace, were not available in Europe and
had to be imported through Arab traders, making them outrageously
expensive.

Although most of the 237 men who embarked on the journey in 1519 died
along the way, including Magellan himself who was killed in the
Philippines, one ship made it back in 1522 with 18 men and a cargo
laden with spices, and the expedition earned a financial profit.

The author, Stefan Zweig (born November 28, 1881, Vienna, Austria –
died February 22, 1942, Petrópolis, Brazil), was an Austrian novelist,
playwright, journalist and biographer was one of the most successful
and popular authors of the 20th Century. Although he wrote in German,
his works were translated into English and several other languages. He
is regarded as one of the most translated authors of all time.

Strangely, at the peak of his popularity and having just completed his
autobiography while still working on four other books, Zweig committed
suicide in Brazil with his new wife by them both taking poison.

Zweig left a suicide note stating that he had done so because of the
Nazi takeover of his country of Austria and because Europe was
destroying itself with World War II that was taking place.

This does not seem like a good reason for suicide and why did he take
his new wife, aged only about 30, with him?

Zweig committed suicide on the day after his book “Amerigo: A comedy
of errors in history” had been published in New York. That book
concerned the fact that, contrary to popular belief, Amerigo Vespucci
neither discovered America nor did he establish that America was a new
continent.

In “Conqueror of the Seas: The Story of Magellan”, Zweig considers the
possibility that Magellan did not really discover the Strait of
Magellan. Magellan had with him on his voyage a secret map that showed
a strait connecting the Atlantic Ocean to the “South Sea” that had
been discovered in 1513 by Balboa. This leads Zweig to wonder whether
some other Portuguese explorer prior to Magellan might have discovered
the route and thus the “Strait of Magellan“ was misnamed.

Magellan did not show his map to the other seamen on his ships for
fear that they would mutiny, as had often happened in other voyages of
exploration. For example, a mutiny had prevented Bartholomeu Dias from
reaching India after he had been the first to round the Cape of Good
Hope.

What Magellan had was a map prepared by a German Geographer, Martin
Behaim (October 6, 1459 – July 29, 1507). That map in turn was based
on a Dutch map “Copia der Newen Zeytung auss Presillg Landt”. However,
the map Magellan had probably showed the mouth of The Rio de la Plata,
which was far larger than any other river the Europeans had
experienced and must have seemed like a route to the South Sea.

It did turn out that the map Magellan had resembled the Strait of
Magellan that Magellan subsequently discovered a thousand miles south
of where he expected it to be, but this has been passed off as a
coincidence. There is no evidence that any European before Magellan
ever reached the Strait of Magellan before Magellan did.

Not only was Magellan the first European ever to traverse the Strait
of Magellan, he was also the last for a long time. Many other ships
that tried to follow his path were dashed on the rocks. After Magellan
completed the first circumnavigation of the globe in 1521, it was 60
years before another man was able to do it. That was Sir Francis Drake
who is famous for (among other things) leading the first English
circumnavigation of the world from 1577 to 1580.

As to the reasons for the historic voyage by Magellan, it was not for
fame and glory. It was for food. Europeans at that time had a bland
diet. The foods Europeans eat today, such as potatoes, corn and
tomatoes, did not exist or were not known at that time. Pepper had to
be imported from the south of India through Arab traders and was
outrageously expensive. Nutmeg and cloves had to come from the Spice
Islands, now part of Indonesia, and was worth more than its weight in
gold.

Magellan had already been to what is now Malaysia as a member of a
crew of 1500 men on 22 ships. He had left behind his friend and
partner Francisco Serrão, who had stayed behind on the Spice Islands,
being lured there by the easy life and the easy women, just as many a
European man has been lured there ever since.

When Francisco Serrão died, found among his papers was a letter from
Magellan, indicating that he might be joining him soon via “another
way”. This seems to indicate that Magellan already had the idea of
reaching the Spice Islands by first crossing the Atlantic.

But Magellan never quite made it. He became the first man to circle
the globe, by reaching the Philippines after crossing first the
Atlantic Ocean, then the Strait of Magellan and then the Pacific Ocean
but then, only a few days after reaching the Philippines, he
ridiculously took sides in a war between two rival chiefs. Almost
single handedly, Magellan tried to attack an army of 1500 Filipino men
and was immediately killed.

The man who killed Magellan, Lapu-Lapu (1491 — 1542), who was the
Tribal Chief of Mactan, an island in the Visayas in the Philippines,
is now regarded as the first Filipino hero, and for good reason. It is
to be recalled that when Columbus discovered America in 1492, the
Native Americans were friendly and helpful, believing that Columbus
and his men had come from the sky. Within less than a century, almost
all of them had been exterminated.

There is now a statue of Lapu-Lapu in his honor on Mactan Island near
Cebu for having killed Magellan, thereby resisting European invasion
and takeover.

After the death of Magellan, his remaining men divided into two
groups. One group decided to go back to Europe the way that they had
come, by crossing the Pacific Ocean. However, they never made it.

The other group, led by Juan Sebastián Elcano, made it back to Spain
with only one ship, but that ship had a cargo laden with valuable
spices that had been acquired in the Spice Islands, with the result
that the entire expedition earned a financial profit, which was the
purpose of the expedition in the first place.

Of 237 men who had left with Magellan on five ships three years
earlier, only 18 were left on the only ship to return. However, not
all of the others had died along the way. Some who had been captured
by the Portuguese or who had been left behind on the Cape Verde
Islands arrived later. A few others had voluntarily stayed behind,
preferring the company of the easy women in the Philippines. At least
two had been marooned on the coast of Brazil following an unsuccessful
attempt at mutiny. There seems to be no record of what happened to
those two. Although most of the original 237 were dead, many of them
still have never been fully accounted for.

Sam Sloan
New York NY
February 19, 2010


ISBN 4-87187-856-2
978-4-87187-856-2

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878562
http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878562
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Old February 20th 10, 04:04 AM posted to soc.culture.filipino,soc.culture.spain,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics,soc.culture.usa
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Default Conqueror of The Seas The Story of Magellan

almost a subplot to the circumnavigation..the Austronesian connection
is inside this book..
..Now came the wonder. The Islanders surrounded Enrique chattering and
shouting, and the Malay slave was dumbfounded,for the understood much
of what they were saying. He understood much of what they saying. He
understood their questions. It was a good many years since he was
snatched from his home, a good many years since he had last heard a
word of his native speech. What amazing moment, one of the remarkable
inthe history of mankind! For the first time since our planet begun to
spin upon its axis and to circle in its orbit, a living man, himself
circling that planet, had got back to his homeland. No matter that he
was underling,a slave, for his significance lies in his fate and not
his personality. Heis known to us by his slave-name Enrique; but we
know, likewise, that hewas torn from his home upon the island of
Sumatra, was brought by Magellan in Malacca, was taken by his master
to India, to Africa, and to Lisbon; traveled hence to Brazil and to
Patagonia; and first of all the population of the world, traversing
the oceans, circling the globe, he returned to the region where men
spoke a familiar tongue. Having made acquaintance on the way with
hundred of people and tribes and races, each of which had different
way of communicating thought, he had got back to his folk, whom he
could understand and could understand him.

Nestor Palugod Enriquez
www.filipinohome.com
www.firstcircumnavigation.tripod.com
Yesterday's history, tomorrow's a mystery.
Today is a gift,and that's why we call it the present.


On Feb 19, 5:37*pm, samsloan wrote:
Conqueror of The Seas
The Story of Magellan
by Stefan Zweig

Ferdinand Magellan was the first man ever to sail around the world.
His voyage was financed 75% by the King of Spain, Charles V, The Holy
Roman Emperor, and 25% by Christopher de Haro, a Dutch businessman
residing in Spain. The purpose of the trip by Magellan was not Gold,
Glory and God, as is commonly believed. Rather, it was for better
food, as the basic spices commonly available today, including pepper,
cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and mace, were not available in Europe and
had to be imported through Arab traders, making them outrageously
expensive.

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Old February 20th 10, 09:58 AM posted to soc.culture.filipino,soc.culture.spain,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics,soc.culture.usa
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Conqueror of The Seas The Story of Magellan

It is an interesting point that I have been thinking about that
although Magellan is credited with being the first person to
circumnavigate the globe, this person Enrique was with him too so he
also circumnavigated the globe at the same time.

"Enrique" is always referred to as a slave but I wonder if he was
really a slave as he obviiously could have escaped easily many times.

It is believed that Enrique was involved in a plot to poison about 30
crew members. After Magellan was killed, the man who supposedly had
just been converted to Christianity only a few days later invited the
surviving crew members to a big dinner. They were poisoned and about
30 of them died. What do the Filipinos think about that? Is this true?
Did you do that?

Sam Sloan

On Feb 19, 11:04*pm, nestor wrote:
almost a subplot to the circumnavigation..the Austronesian connection
is inside this book..
.Now came the wonder. The Islanders surrounded Enrique chattering and
shouting, and the Malay slave was dumbfounded,for the understood much
of what they were saying. He understood much of what they saying. He
understood their questions. It was a good many years since he was
snatched from his home, a good many years since he had last heard a
word of his native speech. What amazing moment, one of the remarkable
inthe history of mankind! For the first time since our planet begun to
spin upon its axis and to circle in its orbit, a living man, himself
circling that planet, had got back to his homeland. No matter that he
was underling,a slave, for his significance lies in his fate and not
his personality. Heis known to us by his slave-name Enrique; but we
know, likewise, that hewas torn from his home upon the island of
Sumatra, was brought by Magellan in Malacca, was taken by his master
to India, to Africa, and to Lisbon; traveled hence to Brazil and to
Patagonia; and first of all the population of the world, traversing
the oceans, circling the globe, he returned to the region where men
spoke a familiar tongue. Having made acquaintance on the way with
hundred of people and tribes and races, each of which had different
way of communicating thought, he had got back to his folk, whom he
could understand *and could understand him.

Nestor Palugod Enriquezwww.filipinohome.comwww.firstcircumnavigat ion.tripod.com
Yesterday's history, tomorrow's a mystery.
Today is a gift,and that's why we call it the present.

On Feb 19, 5:37*pm, samsloan wrote:

Conqueror of The Seas
The Story of Magellan
by Stefan Zweig


Ferdinand Magellan was the first man ever to sail around the world.
His voyage was financed 75% by the King of Spain, Charles V, The Holy
Roman Emperor, and 25% by Christopher de Haro, a Dutch businessman
residing in Spain. The purpose of the trip by Magellan was not Gold,
Glory and God, as is commonly believed. Rather, it was for better
food, as the basic spices commonly available today, including pepper,
cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves and mace, were not available in Europe and
had to be imported through Arab traders, making them outrageously
expensive.


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