Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old April 2nd 10, 10:04 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

Hiroshima by John Hersey

Foreword by Sam Sloan

“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.

However, I am not writing this foreword to recount events that almost
everybody by now knows, but to tell how these events have impacted my
own life.

My wife is from Hiroshima. Her father, born 16 February 1930, is a
Hibakusha, meaning that he is an A-bomb survivor.

Born in Hiroshima, his school teacher asked him to go to a factory
away from the center of the town on that day to help out because there
was a shortage of men. When the bomb was dropped, his teacher, who had
sent him on this errand, and all the other children in his class were
incinerated, except for a few other kids who had played hooky from
school that day.

He is still alive today, apparently perfectly healthy, at 80 years of
ago. The only problem is that he does not like me.

Oh, by the way, who was it who dropped the bomb?

As I am always quick to point out, my uncle had absolutely nothing to
do with dropping the A-bomb on Hiroshima.

My Uncle absolutely did not drop the A-Bomb on my father-in-law.

He only helped to drop the A-bomb on Nagasaki.

My uncle, Alden Dale "Jake" Jacobson (1916-2001), was a B-29 pilot who
flew one of the support aircraft that accompanied the aircraft that
dropped the A-bomb on Nagasaki. What he was doing was called “flying
Super-Dumbo”. This meant that he was to circle around to see if any of
the airplanes did not make it back to base and had to ditch in the
ocean. This was often the case. The pilot who actually did drop the A-
bomb on Nagasaki, Major Charles W. Sweeney, wrote in his book, “War's
End”, that he ran out of fuel on the way back and his aircraft was
flying on empty for the last few miles, but nevertheless he landed
safely at Tinien Island.

My Uncle Alden's job on that mission was that if any aircraft had to
ditch in the ocean, his crew would drop life rafts and survival gear
and circle around to direct the navy where to come to pick them up.

Fortunately, this did not happen on this mission. All of the aircraft
made it back to base safely. At least our guys in the air were a lot
better off than their guys on the ground at Hiroshima.

Here is a picture of my Uncle Alden Jacobson wearing his aviator suit
and cap. I found this picture in an old suitcase of family photos left
by my mother when she died in 2002.

The crew members on these B-29s would give names to their airplanes.
They would paint a picture usually of a scantily clad female and they
might name the aircraft after her.

However, the pilot of the B-29 that dropped the A-Bomb on Hiroshima
did not name his airplane after his imaginary girlfriend. Instead, he
named it after his mother, Enola Gay.

The airplane that dropped the A-Bomb on Nagasaki was named Bock's Car.
This was not the word “boxcar”, a common mistake. It was named Bock's
Car because the man who regularly flew that aircraft was a man named
Bock.

Major Charles W. Sweeney had been specially trained to drop the A-Bomb
on Nagasaki. One reason for this is that after the bomb is dropped,
the pilot must immediately veer off in another direction. If he
continues in the same direction where he had been going, the bomb will
explode directly underneath him and will kill the pilot and his crew.

So, they had to practice and make sure that they would be far enough
away when the bomb exploded so that they would be safe.

I am not sure how far away my uncle was when the A-Bomb exploded, but
he told me that he saw the mushroom cloud go up. He lived to age 85
and never seemed to suffer any ill effects because of the A-Bomb.

My uncle flew 30 bombing runs over Japan. Apparently, 30 was a magic
number. If you flew 30 missions, you got to go home. However, my uncle
never got to go home, because his 30th mission was also the last
mission of the war.

My uncle's airplane was called “Jake's Jalopy”. It was named after
himself, because his nickname was Jake, since his name was Alden
Jacobson. All of my uncles on my mother's side had the same nickname,
Jake. He flew Jake's Jalopy on the mission on which the A-Bomb was
dropped on Nagasaki.

My Uncle Alden played a minor role in another event in the remainder
of the war. When the Japanese announced that they were surrendering
shortly after the bomb on Nagasaki had been dropped, the Americans
were not entirely sure that the Japanese were really surrendering.
They feared that it might be a trap. They feared that the Japanese
were just pretending to surrender so that after the Americans landed
they could just kill us all.

In order to make sure that the Japanese fully understood that they had
no other choice but to surrender, the Americans put on what we called
a “Display of Force”. Four hundred American B-29s were put in the sky
at the same time and they flew around all over Japan, circling all the
great cities. The point was that the Japanese were shown that they
were helpless. They could not shoot us down. We could bomb and kill
them all at will. They had to fully understand that resistance would
be futile.

The first Display of Force was on August 30, 1945 and the second was
on September 2, 1945, the same day that the Japanese signed the formal
surrender documents on the Battleship Missouri. My uncle only flew on
the first Display of Force. This time my uncle was not flying Jake's
Jalopy. This time he was a co-pilot, but he had the same crew with
him. Several of those crew members are still alive and have been
writing about this on the Internet.

During the Display of Force, two of my uncle's airplane engines caught
on fire. He had to land. He could see the Japanese airbase, Atsugi
Airbase, so he radioed in that he was going to land there. However,
the repy came back: Permission to land at Atsugi Air Base was denied
because General Douglas was going to land there in two hours and
MacArthur wanted to be known as the first American to land in Japan
after the surrender. In order to make sure that the airplane of
General Douglas MacArthur was the very first to land, my uncle was
ordered to ditch in the Ocean.

My uncle basically decided, to Hell with that: He was not going to
risk and possibly lose his life just so that General Douglas MacArthur
would be the first to land in Japan. So he DISOBEYED THE ORDER. He
knew that Atsugi Air Base had been occupied the US Navy three hours
earlier, so he landed there anyway.

It was a difficult landing because the runway at Atsugi Air Base was
smaller and narrower than the runways the Americans had been used to
and, more troublesome, a B-29 was a lot heavier than any airplane the
Japanese had. They feared that the weight of the aircraft might break
through the concrete. They made the landing anyway. It was certainly a
lot better than ditching in the ocean.

When they got on the ground, they immediately heard yelling to get
that airplane out of there because General MacArthur was coming. They
could not take off again as, after all, the engine was still on fire,
so they tried to push the airplane off the runway on to a dirt field.
Predictably, as soon as the nose wheel of the 100,000 pound airplane
hit the dirt, it sank down and could not be gotten out again.

So, my uncle was literally stuck in the mud. He could not leave Japan.

So, he stayed in Japan. His wife was brought over and gave birth to a
child there in 1948, so I have a cousin who was born in Japan. He did
not return to America until 1951, when he was transferred to a job
working in the Pentagon and moved to Falls Church, Virginia. He
retired after 20 years in the military service and was awarded the
Distinguished Flying Cross.

It is often erroneously stated that General Douglas MacArthur was the
first land in Japan, whereas my uncle really was. I looked in the
Autobiography of Douglas MacArthur it see if he would make that claim.

This comes up on page 310 of his autobiography, “Reminiscences”. Here,
MacArthur admits that there were other US aircraft already on the
ground when he arrived. Nevertheless, he exaggerates his own bravery.
He makes it seem like he landed virtually alone, unescorted. He makes
no mention of the fact that there had been 400 US B-29s circling
overhead during the Display of Force just before he landed.

It is ironic that here I am married to a Japanese woman with a half-
Japanese child, whereas my wife would never have been born and thus my
child would not exist had her father been just a little bit closer to
the center of Hiroshima when the A-bomb went off. This book,
“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.

There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.

Sam Sloan
New York NY
USA
April 2, 2010

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=092389165X

http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X

  #2   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 03:30 AM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,073
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:
Hiroshima by John Hersey

Foreword by Sam Sloan

“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)

This book,
“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.

There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923....

http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.
  #3   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 10:02 AM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 319
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 2, 7:30*pm, The Historian wrote:
On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:

Hiroshima by John Hersey


Foreword by Sam Sloan


“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)

*This book,



“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.


There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923....


http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.



Perhaps this time we will be fortunate and someone will squash the
Sloanroach as he deserves.
  #4   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 01:58 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

Thank you very much. I really do appreciate you people telling me how
to run my business.
  #5   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 02:37 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

Can't the victim sue the perp?

My daughter is still suffering from radiation poisoning from events
that occurred 56 years before her birth.


  #6   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 02:56 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,073
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 3, 9:37*am, samsloan wrote:
Can't the victim sue the perp?

My daughter is still suffering from radiation poisoning from events
that occurred 56 years before her birth.


Sue for reparations.
  #7   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 09:47 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2004
Posts: 178
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 2, 10:30*pm, The Historian wrote:
On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:

Hiroshima by John Hersey


Foreword by Sam Sloan


“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)

*This book,



“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.


There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923....


http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.


This is an important literary property,
Let me emphasize the word "property."

David Ames
  #8   Report Post  
Old April 3rd 10, 10:18 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 3, 4:47*pm, David Ames wrote:
On Apr 2, 10:30*pm, The Historian wrote:



On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:


Hiroshima by John Hersey


Foreword by Sam Sloan


“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk..


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)


*This book,


“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived..
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.


There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923...


http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.


This is an important literary property,
Let me emphasize the word "property."

David Ames


But whose property? Remember that this was first published as a
magazine article, not a book.

I am not worried. They would not dare sue us. My daughter's Japanese
passport says that she is a born citizen of Hiroshima Prefecture,
Japan.

Aren't perpetrators of war crimes supposed to pay reparations to the
victims, or is it the other way around?

Sam Sloan
  #9   Report Post  
Old April 5th 10, 01:27 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,alt.history,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2004
Posts: 178
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 3, 5:18*pm, samsloan wrote:
On Apr 3, 4:47*pm, David Ames wrote:





On Apr 2, 10:30*pm, The Historian wrote:


On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:


Hiroshima by John Hersey


Foreword by Sam Sloan


“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)


*This book,


“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.


There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923...


http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.


This is an important literary property,
Let me emphasize the word "property."


David Ames


But whose property? Remember that this was first published as a
magazine article, not a book.

I am not worried. They would not dare sue us. My daughter's Japanese
passport says that she is a born citizen of Hiroshima Prefecture,
Japan.

Aren't perpetrators of war crimes supposed to pay reparations to the
victims, or is it the other way around?

Sam Sloan- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Wiley is asserting a right which did not previously exist. A decision
in their favor is being appealed. Wiley claims that for [their] books
printed abroad, they have the right to dictate conditions under which
ownership of the physical item may be transferred, conditions under
which it may be lent to another user, conditions under which it may be
left out for the trash collector.

Join the conversations at Amazon.com to read more about it. If you
can reference the case materials, I would take great pleasure in
reading them.

I am sure you get the picture.

David Ames
  #10   Report Post  
Old April 5th 10, 01:51 PM posted to soc.culture.japan,soc.culture.usa,soc.history,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Hiroshima by John Hersey

On Apr 5, 8:27*am, David Ames wrote:
On Apr 3, 5:18*pm, samsloan wrote:



On Apr 3, 4:47*pm, David Ames wrote:


On Apr 2, 10:30*pm, The Historian wrote:


On Apr 2, 5:04*pm, samsloan wrote:


Hiroshima by John Hersey


Foreword by Sam Sloan


“At, exactly fifteen minutes past eight in the morning on August 6,
1945, Japanese time, at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above
Hiroshima, Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of
the East Asia Tin Works, had just sat down at her place in the plant
office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk.


With these now famous words, this book begins.


(Snip)


*This book,


“Hiroshima”, recounts what happened to *six people who were close to
where the bomb dropped but who survived. They were all about a half
mile from the epicenter of where the bomb exploded, yet they survived.
It was originally published as a magazine article in 1946. It is made
famous by its terse, matter-of-fact, emotionless style.


There have been many revisions and updates since. The author came back
in later years to see what had happened to the six protagonists in the
story. However, in my opinion, these revisions did not make the story
better. They just made the story longer. So, what I am reprinting here
is just the 1946 original, without a single word added or subtracted.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * New York NY
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * USA
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * April 2, 2010


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo....asp?ISBN=0923...


http://www.amazon.com/dp/092389165X


I believe the book is still copyrighted by Hersey's estate. Knopf, a
division of Random House, is the publisher.


This is an important literary property,
Let me emphasize the word "property."


David Ames


But whose property? Remember that this was first published as a
magazine article, not a book.


I am not worried. They would not dare sue us. My daughter's Japanese
passport says that she is a born citizen of Hiroshima Prefecture,
Japan.


Aren't perpetrators of war crimes supposed to pay reparations to the
victims, or is it the other way around?


Sam Sloan- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


Wiley is asserting a right which did not previously exist. *A decision
in their favor is being appealed. *Wiley claims that for [their] books
printed abroad, they have the right to dictate conditions under which
ownership of the physical item may be transferred, conditions under
which it may be lent to another user, conditions under which it may be
left out for the trash collector.

Join the conversations at Amazon.com to read more about it. *If you
can reference the case materials, I would take great pleasure in
reading them.

I am sure you get the picture.

David Ames


Can you give me a link? I cannot find it.

I see there is a pending case, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. et al v. Alin
Treeakarabenjakul et al

Is that the case?

If you are referring to the book, "Hiroshima", it was originally
published as a magazine article in New Yorker Magazine. I cannot see
how John Wiley & Sons has any claim on it.

Sam Sloan
Reply
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
John Sloan's New York Scene samsloan rec.games.chess.politics (Chess Politics) 14 December 11th 09 07:21 AM
John Sloan's New York Scene samsloan rec.games.chess.misc (Chess General) 14 December 11th 09 07:21 AM
Does George John Really Exist? Sam Sloan alt.chess (Alternative Chess Group) 21 July 6th 05 11:15 PM
Does George John Really Exist? Sam Sloan alt.chess (Alternative Chess Group) 7 June 16th 05 03:58 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:13 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 ChessBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Chess"

 

Copyright © 2017