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Old July 17th 11, 09:17 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,alt.video.dvd,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
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Default The Grapes of Wrath

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878999

The Grapes of Wrath

Introduction by

Sam Sloan

The Grapes of Wrath is the brilliantly written story depicting the
life of Americans during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s when Oklahoma
farmers were forced off the land they had farmed for generations and
moved to California for the better life they believed they would find
picking peaches and grapes.

The title comes from a line in the song "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic" which goes:

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where
the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
(Chorus)
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.

In elementary school, we sung this song a bit differently. We sung it
like this:

Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Teacher hit me with a rulla
Hit her in the bean with a rotten tangerine
While God is marching on.
The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 by John Steinbeck (1902-1968).
In 1940 it was made into a movie staring Henry Fonda. This was the
first movie for Henry Fonda and it made him a star.

Although the movie follows the book closely, especially in the first
part, the emphasis is somewhat different. The first chapter in the
book is about the Earth. The Earth is dried and cracked. There has
been no rain. The corn does not grow. Even the weeds do not grow. The
crop has failed.

Tom Joad hitches a ride home, even though the driver is under orders
from his boss not to carry passengers. This small detail sets the tone
for the book, as some times the common man should disobey orders from
the big (evil) rich people who rule everything.

Tom Joad has just been released from prison on parole. He was
sentenced to seven years in prison for killing a man in a fight that
was started by the other man. He got out on parole after serving only
four. This important fact goes throughout the whole book. Tom Joad
cannot afford to be arrested even for the most minor offense because,
if he gets arrested, he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remaining three years. His family needs him. They cannot survive
without him. Therefore, every time Tom Joad is faced with a difficult
situation, he cannot stand his ground and fight like a man normally
would. He must hide and run.

This allows the plot to develop, as again and again Tom Joad witnesses
injustice and each time, rather than correct that injustice, he must
run to where he encounters yet another injustice.

The movie ends with Tom Joad resolving that he will not run any more.
From now on, it will be different:

Tom Joad says:
I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere. Wherever you can
look, wherever there's a fight, so hungry people can eat, I'll be
there. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be
in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh
when they're hungry and they know supper's ready, and when the people
are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build,
I'll be there, too.

The author, John Steinbeck, was accused of being a Communist for
writing this book and quite possibly he was. He was clearly on the far
left of the political spectrum. This created a problem for the
producers of this movie, as they were Republicans. They got through it
by toning down the political rhetoric a bit.

The first major scene in the movie comes when Tom Joad while returning
home in Oklahoma meets Jim Casy, the preacher who baptized Tom in an
irrigation ditch, sitting under a tree by the side of the road. Casy
says that he does not preach any more because he has "lost the spirit"
and his faith. It used to be that after he had baptized a bunch of
girls, “I'd take one of them girls out in the grass and I'd lay with
her. Done it every time. Then I'd feel bad and I'd pray.”

Casy says in the book that he could not understand why, when a girl
got filled with that Holy Spirit, the more grace she got in her, the
quicker she wanted to go out in the grass and get laid. Finally he
decided, “There ain't no sin and there ain't no virtue. There's just
stuff people do.

This long discussion about philosophy and religion is in line with a
possible conversion to Communism, because Karl Marx wrote that
religion is the “Opiate for the Masses”.

Tom Joad arrives home to find the family farm deserted. He learns that
his family has left and they now live with Uncle John. He goes to
Uncle John's house and learns that both families are being
dispossessed of their farms. They are sharecroppers. They have worked
the land for generations but have never owned it. They always paid a
share of their crop to the owner. However, now there is no crop. The
corn has not grown. So, the owner has taken back the land and they
must leave.

Almost all of the surrounding farmers are in the same situation. Big
companies with modern tractors are taking over the farms and all the
farmers must leave, even though they were born on the land and have
lived their entire lives there.

Needless to say, Uncle Joe Stalin liked this part of the plot, as the
serfs in Russia had faced the same situation and this had led to the
Communist revolution. However, when Stalin found out that in the next
scene, the Joad Family loads all their possessions on a car converted
into a truck and heads for California, he banned this movie from the
Soviet Union, because it shows that even the poorest Americans could
afford a car.

On this amazing contraption seen on the cover, the Joad Family makes
it to California but only after two family members die along the way.
Grandpa refuses to go but they take him against his will anyway as
they cannot leave him behind, and he dies on the first night. They
have no money to bury him, so they dig a grave along side the road and
leave a note with his body saying that nobody killed him, he just
died, so that there will be no investigation if somebody finds his
body.

Grandmother dies just as they are reaching the boarder with
California. They keep the fact that she is dead a secret when they
reach the check point at the border with California for fear that if
the California authorities find out that she is dead they will be
turned back.

So, Grandmother does finally make it to California even though she
died doing it.

They came to California thinking they could make good money picking
peaches. When the arrive at the first of a series of work camps, they
discover that the families who got there before them are starving. As
poor as the Joads are, they are still better off than most of the
other families there.

As they move from work camp to work camp, outside agitators try to get
into the camps in order to organize the migrant farm workers into
labor unions. The owners use force to break up the meetings with these
outside agitators.

Jim Casy, the preacher Tom Joad met in one of the early scenes and who
has accompanied the Joad family to California, has thrown in with the
outside agitators. Tom Joad sneaks out of the work camp one night and
finds Jim Casy meeting with those who are trying to organize this into
a labor union. Just then, a group of officers comes to break up the
meeting. Jim Casy is killed in the fight and then Tom Joad kills the
man who has just killed Jim Casy.

Tom Joad knows that he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remainder of his sentence if it is found that he is the one who killed
the officer, so he sneaks back into the camp to inform his family.
They hide him in the bottom of the contraption they have been driving
and drive out of the camp without Tom being found, so he escapes.

All of this deals with the social issue of migrant farm workers in
California. That issue still exists to this day. The only difference
is that nowadays most migrant farm workers in California are illegals
from Mexico and other countries. Their children are born on the
California farms and thus are American citizens. They move from farm
to farm, picking peaches, grapes (hence the title of this book) and
other agricultural products. We eat the food they pick. Their children
work along side their parents, rarely going to school and receiving
little or no educational.

This is a social problem that has never been solved and never will be,
as there is no solution. That is one reason why “The Grapes of Wrath”
has been deemed “The Great American novel”.


Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
July 17, 2011

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878999
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Old July 18th 11, 02:45 AM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,alt.video.dvd,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2010
Posts: 134
Default Anything not Nailed Down

On Jul 17, 4:17*pm, samsloan wrote:
http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996h...SBN=4871878999

The Grapes of Wrath

Introduction by

Sam Sloan

The Grapes of Wrath is the brilliantly written story depicting the
life of Americans during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s when Oklahoma
farmers were forced off the land they had farmed for generations and
moved to California for the better life they believed they would find
picking peaches and grapes.

The title comes from a line in the song "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic" which goes:

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where
* * * * * * * * the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
(Chorus)
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.

In elementary school, we sung this song a bit differently. We sung it
like this:

Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Teacher hit me with a rulla
Hit her in the bean with a rotten tangerine
While God is marching on.
The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 by John Steinbeck (1902-1968).
In 1940 it was made into a movie staring Henry Fonda. This was the
first movie for Henry Fonda and it made him a star.

Although the movie follows the book closely, especially in the first
part, the emphasis is somewhat different. The first chapter in the
book is about the Earth. The Earth is dried and cracked. There has
been no rain. The corn does not grow. Even the weeds do not grow. The
crop has failed.

Tom Joad hitches a ride home, even though the driver is under orders
from his boss not to carry passengers. This small detail sets the tone
for the book, as some times the common man should disobey orders from
the big (evil) rich people who rule everything.

Tom Joad has just been released from prison on parole. He was
sentenced to seven years in prison for killing a man in a fight that
was started by the other man. He got out on parole after serving only
four. This important fact goes throughout the whole book. Tom Joad
cannot afford to be arrested even for the most minor offense because,
if he gets arrested, he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remaining three years. His family needs him. They cannot survive
without him. Therefore, every time Tom Joad is faced with a difficult
situation, he cannot stand his ground and fight like a man normally
would. He must hide and run.

This allows the plot to develop, as again and again Tom Joad witnesses
injustice and each time, rather than correct that injustice, he must
run to where he encounters yet another injustice.

The movie ends with Tom Joad resolving that he will not run any more.
From now on, it will be different:

Tom Joad says:
I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere. Wherever you can
look, wherever there's a fight, so hungry people can eat, I'll be
there. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be
in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh
when they're hungry and they know supper's ready, and when the people
are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build,
I'll be there, too.

The author, John Steinbeck, was accused of being a Communist for
writing this book and quite possibly he was. He was clearly on the far
left of the political spectrum. This created a problem for the
producers of this movie, as they were Republicans. They got through it
by toning down the political rhetoric a bit.

The first major scene in the movie comes when Tom Joad while returning
home in Oklahoma meets Jim Casy, the preacher who baptized Tom in an
irrigation ditch, sitting under a tree by the side of the road. Casy
says that he does not preach any more because he has "lost the spirit"
and his faith. It used to be that after he had baptized a bunch of
girls, “I'd take one of them girls out in the grass and I'd lay with
her. Done it every time. Then I'd feel bad and I'd pray.”

Casy says in the book that he could not understand why, when a girl
got filled with that Holy Spirit, the more grace she got in her, the
quicker she wanted to go out in the grass and get laid. Finally he
decided, “There ain't no sin and there ain't no virtue. There's just
stuff people do.

This long discussion about philosophy and religion is in line with a
possible conversion to Communism, because Karl Marx wrote that
religion is the “Opiate for the Masses”.

Tom Joad arrives home to find the family farm deserted. He learns that
his family has left and they now live with Uncle John. He goes to
Uncle John's house and learns that both families are being
dispossessed of their farms. They are sharecroppers. They have worked
the land for generations but have never owned it. They always paid a
share of their crop to the owner. However, now there is no crop. The
corn has not grown. So, the owner has taken back the land and they
must leave.

Almost all of the surrounding farmers are in the same situation. Big
companies with modern tractors are taking over the farms and all the
farmers must leave, even though they were born on the land and have
lived their entire lives there.

Needless to say, Uncle Joe Stalin liked this part of the plot, as the
serfs in Russia had faced the same situation and this had led to the
Communist revolution. However, when Stalin found out that in the next
scene, the Joad Family loads all their possessions on a car converted
into a truck and heads for California, he banned this movie from the
Soviet Union, because it shows that even the poorest Americans could
afford a car.

On this amazing contraption seen on the cover, the Joad Family makes
it to California but only after two family members die along the way.
Grandpa refuses to go but they take him against his will anyway as
they cannot leave him behind, and he dies on the first night. They
have no money to bury him, so they dig a grave along side the road and
leave a note with his body saying that nobody killed him, he just
died, so that there will be no investigation if somebody finds his
body.

Grandmother dies just as they are reaching the boarder with
California. They keep the fact that she is dead a secret when they
reach the check point at the border with California for fear that if
the California authorities find out that she is dead they will be
turned back.

So, Grandmother does finally make it to California even though she
died doing it.

They came to California thinking they could make good money picking
peaches. When the arrive at the first of a series of work camps, they
discover that the families who got there before them are starving. As
poor as the Joads are, they are still better off than most of the
other families there.

As they move from work camp to work camp, outside agitators try to get
into the camps in order to organize the migrant farm workers into
labor unions. The owners use force to break up the meetings with these
outside agitators.

Jim Casy, the preacher Tom Joad met in one of the early scenes and who
has accompanied the Joad family to California, has thrown in with the
outside agitators. Tom Joad sneaks out of the work camp one night and
finds Jim Casy meeting with those who are trying to organize this into
a labor union. Just then, a group of officers comes to break up the
meeting. Jim Casy is killed in the fight and then Tom Joad kills the
man who has just killed Jim Casy.

Tom Joad knows that he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remainder of his sentence if it is found that he is the one who killed
the officer, so he sneaks back into the camp to inform his family.
They hide him in the bottom of the contraption they have been driving
and drive out of the camp without Tom being found, so he escapes.

All of this deals with the social issue of migrant farm workers in
California. That issue still exists to this day. The only difference
is that nowadays most migrant farm workers in California are illegals
from Mexico and other countries. Their children are born on the
California farms and thus are American citizens. They move from farm
to farm, picking peaches, grapes (hence the title of this book) and
other agricultural products. We eat the food they pick. Their children
work along side their parents, rarely going to school and receiving
little or no educational.

This is a social problem that has never been solved and never will be,
as there is no solution. That is one reason why “The Grapes of Wrath”
has been deemed “The Great American novel”.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * San Rafael California
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * July 17, 2011

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996h...SBN=4871878999


An American judge intervening in a long-simmering feud has ruled that
the rights to John Steinbeck's most famous novels - including The
Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men - should be seized from his
publisher and handed to his descendants.
In a case that could have significant consequences for families of
artists who fought for creative control, New York judge Richard Owen
ruled that Penguin Books must forfeit the copyright of 10 of
Steinbeck's works, even though the novelist had signed the rights away
in 1938.

The court battle pitched the novelist's granddaughter, Blake Smyle,
and his son Thomas Steinbeck against Penguin Books and Paramount
Pictures. Thomas Steinbeck had alleged that he was the victim of "a 30-
year conspiracy to deprive John Steinbeck's blood heirs".

The judge argued that American copyright law acknowledges the reality
that young authors could not know in advance "the high stature they
would attain" and that it was therefore fair to allow them or their
descendants to renegotiate copyright agreements.

He based his decision in part on a law passed in 1998 after the death
of the singer and American congressmen Sonny Bono, which gives added
powers to the descendants of original creators.

"My clients' primary concern here is to protect and preserve the
legacy of John Steinbeck," the lawyer for the family, Mark Lee, told
reporters. "They are gratified that the judge recognised the
correctness of their position."

Even assuming the ruling survives any appeal, it would not take
immediate effect. Penguin would not have to give up the rights to Of
Mice and Men until 2012. It could continue publishing The Grapes of
Wrath, Steinbeck's celebrated novel about a family of sharecroppers
which came to define American memories of the Depression, until 2014.

US law would then require the new copyright holders to first negotiate
with Penguin, so the company might well continue to publish the books.

As a result of the ruling, Paramount also loses the rights to the
films of The Red Pony and The Long Valley, based on two Steinbeck
works.

Maureen Donnelly, director of publicity for Penguin USA, said: "The
decision is but the first round in what will be a long and complicated
process. Some of the Steinbeck classics published by Penguin are
affected by this decision [but] the purported terminations will not
take effect, for most, for many years."

Steinbeck died in 1968, but his books consistently continue to sell
around two million copies a year. When Oprah Winfrey picked his novel
East of Eden for her book club in 2003, it jumped to second place on
online book retailer Amazon's bestseller list, beaten only by the
latest Harry Potter.

Under the law at the time they were written, many of Steinbeck's works
would be still in the public domain. But the trend has been towards
extending the period of copyright, leading to several high-profile
conflicts between family members and rights holders.

Last year, a California court ruled that the heirs of AA Milne could
not recapture the rights to Winnie the Pooh and other Milne
characters, which are now a profitable franchise for Walt Disney.

Meanwhile, Stephen Joyce, James Joyce's sole living descendant, fights
constantly with academics over the permissible use of passages from
his grandfather's works, including Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake.
According to this week's New Yorker magazine, he told one scholar:
"You should consider a new career as a garbage collector, because
you'll never quote a Joyce text again."


http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2006...oks.booksnews1
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Old July 18th 11, 04:29 AM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,alt.video.dvd,rec.games.chess.politics
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 5
Default Anything not Nailed Down

On Jul 17, 9:45*pm, Your smrat ® wrote:
On Jul 17, 4:17*pm, samsloan wrote:









http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996h...andnoble.com/b...


The Grapes of Wrath


Introduction by


Sam Sloan


The Grapes of Wrath is the brilliantly written story depicting the
life of Americans during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s when Oklahoma
farmers were forced off the land they had farmed for generations and
moved to California for the better life they believed they would find
picking peaches and grapes.


The title comes from a line in the song "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic" which goes:


Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where
* * * * * * * * the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
(Chorus)
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


In elementary school, we sung this song a bit differently. We sung it
like this:


Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Teacher hit me with a rulla
Hit her in the bean with a rotten tangerine
While God is marching on.
The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 by John Steinbeck (1902-1968).
In 1940 it was made into a movie staring Henry Fonda. This was the
first movie for Henry Fonda and it made him a star.


Although the movie follows the book closely, especially in the first
part, the emphasis is somewhat different. The first chapter in the
book is about the Earth. The Earth is dried and cracked. There has
been no rain. The corn does not grow. Even the weeds do not grow. The
crop has failed.


Tom Joad hitches a ride home, even though the driver is under orders
from his boss not to carry passengers. This small detail sets the tone
for the book, as some times the common man should disobey orders from
the big (evil) rich people who rule everything.


Tom Joad has just been released from prison on parole. He was
sentenced to seven years in prison for killing a man in a fight that
was started by the other man. He got out on parole after serving only
four. This important fact goes throughout the whole book. Tom Joad
cannot afford to be arrested even for the most minor offense because,
if he gets arrested, he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remaining three years. His family needs him. They cannot survive
without him. Therefore, every time Tom Joad is faced with a difficult
situation, he cannot stand his ground and fight like a man normally
would. He must hide and run.


This allows the plot to develop, as again and again Tom Joad witnesses
injustice and each time, rather than correct that injustice, he must
run to where he encounters yet another injustice.


The movie ends with Tom Joad resolving that he will not run any more.
From now on, it will be different:


Tom Joad says:
I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere. Wherever you can
look, wherever there's a fight, so hungry people can eat, I'll be
there. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be
in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh
when they're hungry and they know supper's ready, and when the people
are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build,
I'll be there, too.


The author, John Steinbeck, was accused of being a Communist for
writing this book and quite possibly he was. He was clearly on the far
left of the political spectrum. This created a problem for the
producers of this movie, as they were Republicans. They got through it
by toning down the political rhetoric a bit.


The first major scene in the movie comes when Tom Joad while returning
home in Oklahoma meets Jim Casy, the preacher who baptized Tom in an
irrigation ditch, sitting under a tree by the side of the road. Casy
says that he does not preach any more because he has "lost the spirit"
and his faith. It used to be that after he had baptized a bunch of
girls, “I'd take one of them girls out in the grass and I'd lay with
her. Done it every time. Then I'd feel bad and I'd pray.”


Casy says in the book that he could not understand why, when a girl
got filled with that Holy Spirit, the more grace she got in her, the
quicker she wanted to go out in the grass and get laid. Finally he
decided, “There ain't no sin and there ain't no virtue. There's just
stuff people do.


This long discussion about philosophy and religion is in line with a
possible conversion to Communism, because Karl Marx wrote that
religion is the “Opiate for the Masses”.


Tom Joad arrives home to find the family farm deserted. He learns that
his family has left and they now live with Uncle John. He goes to
Uncle John's house and learns that both families are being
dispossessed of their farms. They are sharecroppers. They have worked
the land for generations but have never owned it. They always paid a
share of their crop to the owner. However, now there is no crop. The
corn has not grown. So, the owner has taken back the land and they
must leave.


Almost all of the surrounding farmers are in the same situation. Big
companies with modern tractors are taking over the farms and all the
farmers must leave, even though they were born on the land and have
lived their entire lives there.


Needless to say, Uncle Joe Stalin liked this part of the plot, as the
serfs in Russia had faced the same situation and this had led to the
Communist revolution. However, when Stalin found out that in the next
scene, the Joad Family loads all their possessions on a car converted
into a truck and heads for California, he banned this movie from the
Soviet Union, because it shows that even the poorest Americans could
afford a car.


On this amazing contraption seen on the cover, the Joad Family makes
it to California but only after two family members die along the way.
Grandpa refuses to go but they take him against his will anyway as
they cannot leave him behind, and he dies on the first night. They
have no money to bury him, so they dig a grave along side the road and
leave a note with his body saying that nobody killed him, he just
died, so that there will be no investigation if somebody finds his
body.


Grandmother dies just as they are reaching the boarder with
California. They keep the fact that she is dead a secret when they
reach the check point at the border with California for fear that if
the California authorities find out that she is dead they will be
turned back.


So, Grandmother does finally make it to California even though she
died doing it.


They came to California thinking they could make good money picking
peaches. When the arrive at the first of a series of work camps, they
discover that the families who got there before them are starving. As
poor as the Joads are, they are still better off than most of the
other families there.


As they move from work camp to work camp, outside agitators try to get
into the camps in order to organize the migrant farm workers into
labor unions. The owners use force to break up the meetings with these
outside agitators.


Jim Casy, the preacher Tom Joad met in one of the early scenes and who
has accompanied the Joad family to California, has thrown in with the
outside agitators. Tom Joad sneaks out of the work camp one night and
finds Jim Casy meeting with those who are trying to organize this into
a labor union. Just then, a group of officers comes to break up the
meeting. Jim Casy is killed in the fight and then Tom Joad kills the
man who has just killed Jim Casy.


Tom Joad knows that he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remainder of his sentence if it is found that he is the one who killed
the officer, so he sneaks back into the camp to inform his family.
They hide him in the bottom of the contraption they have been driving
and drive out of the camp without Tom being found, so he escapes.


All of this deals with the social issue of migrant farm workers in
California. That issue still exists to this day. The only difference
is that nowadays most migrant farm workers in California are illegals
from Mexico and other countries. Their children are born on the
California farms and thus are American citizens. They move from farm
to farm, picking peaches, grapes (hence the title of this book) and
other agricultural products. We eat the food they pick. Their children
work along side their parents, rarely going to school and receiving
little or no educational.


This is a social problem that has never been solved and never will be,
as there is no solution. That is one reason why “The Grapes of Wrath”
has been deemed “The Great American novel”.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * San Rafael California
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * July 17, 2011


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996h...andnoble.com/b...


An American judge intervening in a long-simmering feud has ruled that
the rights to John Steinbeck's most famous novels - including The
Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men - should be seized from his
publisher and handed to his descendants.
In a case that could have significant consequences for families of
artists who fought for creative control, New York judge Richard Owen
ruled that Penguin Books must forfeit the copyright of 10 of
Steinbeck's works, even though the novelist had signed the rights away
in 1938.

The court battle pitched the novelist's granddaughter, Blake Smyle,
and his son Thomas Steinbeck against Penguin Books and Paramount
Pictures. Thomas Steinbeck had alleged that he was the victim of "a 30-
year ...

read more »


While I don't think that a book should be an ATM in perpetuity for an
author's descendants--I think it enters the public domain 100 years
after an author's death, which should be long enough for the heirs--
anything that prevents this sort of thing:

http://articles.latimes.com/2008/feb...t/et-cheetah13

is preferable to the likes of Disney's vampire empire screwing authors.
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Old July 18th 11, 04:42 AM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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Default The Grapes of Wrath

Thank you very much for posting this very interesting article.

Sam Sloan

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878999

On Jul 17, 6:45*pm, Your smrat ® wrote:
On Jul 17, 4:17*pm, samsloan wrote:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/b...

The Grapes of Wrath


Introduction by


Sam Sloan


The Grapes of Wrath is the brilliantly written story depicting the
life of Americans during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s when Oklahoma
farmers were forced off the land they had farmed for generations and
moved to California for the better life they believed they would find
picking peaches and grapes.


The title comes from a line in the song "The Battle Hymn of the
Republic" which goes:


Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
He is trampling out the vintage where
* * * * * * * * the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
His truth is marching on.
(Chorus)
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


In elementary school, we sung this song a bit differently. We sung it
like this:


Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Teacher hit me with a rulla
Hit her in the bean with a rotten tangerine
While God is marching on.
The Grapes of Wrath was written in 1939 by John Steinbeck (1902-1968).
In 1940 it was made into a movie staring Henry Fonda. This was the
first movie for Henry Fonda and it made him a star.


Although the movie follows the book closely, especially in the first
part, the emphasis is somewhat different. The first chapter in the
book is about the Earth. The Earth is dried and cracked. There has
been no rain. The corn does not grow. Even the weeds do not grow. The
crop has failed.


Tom Joad hitches a ride home, even though the driver is under orders
from his boss not to carry passengers. This small detail sets the tone
for the book, as some times the common man should disobey orders from
the big (evil) rich people who rule everything.


Tom Joad has just been released from prison on parole. He was
sentenced to seven years in prison for killing a man in a fight that
was started by the other man. He got out on parole after serving only
four. This important fact goes throughout the whole book. Tom Joad
cannot afford to be arrested even for the most minor offense because,
if he gets arrested, he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remaining three years. His family needs him. They cannot survive
without him. Therefore, every time Tom Joad is faced with a difficult
situation, he cannot stand his ground and fight like a man normally
would. He must hide and run.


This allows the plot to develop, as again and again Tom Joad witnesses
injustice and each time, rather than correct that injustice, he must
run to where he encounters yet another injustice.


The movie ends with Tom Joad resolving that he will not run any more.
From now on, it will be different:


Tom Joad says:
I'll be all around in the dark. I'll be everywhere. Wherever you can
look, wherever there's a fight, so hungry people can eat, I'll be
there. Wherever there's a cop beatin' up a guy, I'll be there. I'll be
in the way guys yell when they're mad. I'll be in the way kids laugh
when they're hungry and they know supper's ready, and when the people
are eatin' the stuff they raise and livin' in the houses they build,
I'll be there, too.


The author, John Steinbeck, was accused of being a Communist for
writing this book and quite possibly he was. He was clearly on the far
left of the political spectrum. This created a problem for the
producers of this movie, as they were Republicans. They got through it
by toning down the political rhetoric a bit.


The first major scene in the movie comes when Tom Joad while returning
home in Oklahoma meets Jim Casy, the preacher who baptized Tom in an
irrigation ditch, sitting under a tree by the side of the road. Casy
says that he does not preach any more because he has "lost the spirit"
and his faith. It used to be that after he had baptized a bunch of
girls, “I'd take one of them girls out in the grass and I'd lay with
her. Done it every time. Then I'd feel bad and I'd pray.”


Casy says in the book that he could not understand why, when a girl
got filled with that Holy Spirit, the more grace she got in her, the
quicker she wanted to go out in the grass and get laid. Finally he
decided, “There ain't no sin and there ain't no virtue. There's just
stuff people do.


This long discussion about philosophy and religion is in line with a
possible conversion to Communism, because Karl Marx wrote that
religion is the “Opiate for the Masses”.


Tom Joad arrives home to find the family farm deserted. He learns that
his family has left and they now live with Uncle John. He goes to
Uncle John's house and learns that both families are being
dispossessed of their farms. They are sharecroppers. They have worked
the land for generations but have never owned it. They always paid a
share of their crop to the owner. However, now there is no crop. The
corn has not grown. So, the owner has taken back the land and they
must leave.


Almost all of the surrounding farmers are in the same situation. Big
companies with modern tractors are taking over the farms and all the
farmers must leave, even though they were born on the land and have
lived their entire lives there.


Needless to say, Uncle Joe Stalin liked this part of the plot, as the
serfs in Russia had faced the same situation and this had led to the
Communist revolution. However, when Stalin found out that in the next
scene, the Joad Family loads all their possessions on a car converted
into a truck and heads for California, he banned this movie from the
Soviet Union, because it shows that even the poorest Americans could
afford a car.


On this amazing contraption seen on the cover, the Joad Family makes
it to California but only after two family members die along the way.
Grandpa refuses to go but they take him against his will anyway as
they cannot leave him behind, and he dies on the first night. They
have no money to bury him, so they dig a grave along side the road and
leave a note with his body saying that nobody killed him, he just
died, so that there will be no investigation if somebody finds his
body.


Grandmother dies just as they are reaching the boarder with
California. They keep the fact that she is dead a secret when they
reach the check point at the border with California for fear that if
the California authorities find out that she is dead they will be
turned back.


So, Grandmother does finally make it to California even though she
died doing it.


They came to California thinking they could make good money picking
peaches. When the arrive at the first of a series of work camps, they
discover that the families who got there before them are starving. As
poor as the Joads are, they are still better off than most of the
other families there.


As they move from work camp to work camp, outside agitators try to get
into the camps in order to organize the migrant farm workers into
labor unions. The owners use force to break up the meetings with these
outside agitators.


Jim Casy, the preacher Tom Joad met in one of the early scenes and who
has accompanied the Joad family to California, has thrown in with the
outside agitators. Tom Joad sneaks out of the work camp one night and
finds Jim Casy meeting with those who are trying to organize this into
a labor union. Just then, a group of officers comes to break up the
meeting. Jim Casy is killed in the fight and then Tom Joad kills the
man who has just killed Jim Casy.


Tom Joad knows that he will be sent back to prison to serve the
remainder of his sentence if it is found that he is the one who killed
the officer, so he sneaks back into the camp to inform his family.
They hide him in the bottom of the contraption they have been driving
and drive out of the camp without Tom being found, so he escapes.


All of this deals with the social issue of migrant farm workers in
California. That issue still exists to this day. The only difference
is that nowadays most migrant farm workers in California are illegals
from Mexico and other countries. Their children are born on the
California farms and thus are American citizens. They move from farm
to farm, picking peaches, grapes (hence the title of this book) and
other agricultural products. We eat the food they pick. Their children
work along side their parents, rarely going to school and receiving
little or no educational.


This is a social problem that has never been solved and never will be,
as there is no solution. That is one reason why “The Grapes of Wrath”
has been deemed “The Great American novel”.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sam Sloan
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * San Rafael California
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * July 17, 2011


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996h...andnoble.com/b...


An American judge intervening in a long-simmering feud has ruled that
the rights to John Steinbeck's most famous novels - including The
Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men - should be seized from his
publisher and handed to his descendants.
In a case that could have significant consequences for families of
artists who fought for creative control, New York judge Richard Owen
ruled that Penguin Books must forfeit the copyright of 10 of
Steinbeck's works, even though the novelist had signed the rights away
in 1938.

The court battle pitched the novelist's granddaughter, Blake Smyle,
and his son Thomas Steinbeck against Penguin Books and Paramount
Pictures. Thomas Steinbeck had alleged that he was the victim of "a 30-
year conspiracy to deprive John Steinbeck's blood heirs".

The judge argued that American copyright law acknowledges the reality
that young authors could not know in advance "the high stature they
would attain" and that it was therefore fair to allow them or their
descendants to renegotiate copyright agreements.

He based his decision in part on a law passed in 1998 after the death
of the singer and American congressmen Sonny Bono, which gives added
powers to the descendants of original creators.

"My clients' primary concern here is to protect and preserve the
legacy of John Steinbeck," the lawyer for the family, Mark Lee, told
reporters. "They are gratified that the judge recognised the
correctness of their position."

Even assuming the ruling survives any appeal, it would not take
immediate effect. Penguin would not have to give up the rights to Of
Mice and Men until 2012. It could continue publishing The Grapes of
Wrath, Steinbeck's celebrated novel about a family of sharecroppers
which came to define American memories of the Depression, until 2014.

US law would then require the new copyright holders to first negotiate
with Penguin, so the company might well continue to publish the books.

As a result of the ruling, Paramount also loses the rights to the
films of The Red Pony and The Long Valley, based on two Steinbeck
works.

Maureen Donnelly, director of publicity for Penguin USA, said: "The
decision is but the first round in what will be a long and complicated
process. Some of the Steinbeck classics published by Penguin are
affected by this decision [but] the purported terminations will not
take effect, for most, for many years."

Steinbeck died in 1968, but his books consistently continue to sell
around two million copies a year. When Oprah Winfrey picked his novel
East of Eden for her book club in 2003, it jumped to second place on
online book retailer Amazon's bestseller list, beaten only by the
latest Harry Potter.

Under the law at the time they were written, many of Steinbeck's works
would be still in the public domain. But the trend has been towards
extending the period of copyright, leading to several high-profile
conflicts between family members and rights holders.

Last year, a California court ruled that the heirs of AA Milne could
not recapture the rights to Winnie the Pooh and other Milne
characters, which are now a profitable franchise for Walt Disney.

Meanwhile, Stephen Joyce, James Joyce's sole living descendant, fights
constantly with academics over the permissible use of passages from
his grandfather's works, including Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake.
According to this week's New Yorker magazine, he told one scholar:
"You should consider a new career as a garbage collector, because
you'll never quote a Joyce text again."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2006...oks.booksnews1


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Old July 18th 11, 06:23 AM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,alt.video.dvd,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jul 2007
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Default The Grapes of Wrath


"samsloan" wrote in message
...

SNIPPING "REVIEW"

There's so much wrong with this review it isn't funny. First off, it's
written like a third-grade book report. If it IS a third-grade book report,
forgive me.

Not Henry Fonda's first movie, by 5 years and an awful lot of movies.

Neither the book nor the movie ends with Tom promising not to run away.

Actually, instead of recounting the errors and misinterpretations, I invite
the writer to go back and look at the movie again (presuming he actually saw
it in the first place) and take notes this time.

Jim Beaver




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Old July 18th 11, 12:24 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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Default Not Nailed Down

On Jul 17, 11:42*pm, samsloan wrote:

Thank you very much for posting this very interesting article.


It's a very interesting article about how the book you're selling
isn't in the public domain.

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Old July 18th 11, 03:56 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
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Default Not Nailed Down

On Jul 18, 4:24*am, Your smrat ® wrote:
On Jul 17, 11:42*pm, samsloan wrote:

Thank you very much for posting this very interesting article.


It's a very interesting article about how the book you're selling
isn't in the public domain.


Actually, the article does not say that.

East Of Eden is probably protected by copyright because it was first
published in 1952. You can be sure that I will not touch that one.

Sam
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Old July 18th 11, 04:00 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
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Default The Grapes of Wrath

On Jul 18, 4:24*am, Your smrat ® wrote:
On Jul 17, 11:42*pm, samsloan wrote:

Thank you very much for posting this very interesting article.


It's a very interesting article about how the book you're selling
isn't in the public domain.


It is not my job to educate the Great Unwashed Masses about the
copyright laws, but let me give you a hint.

Copyright laws changed in 1978. John Steinbeck died in 1968.

Sam

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878999
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Old July 18th 11, 04:05 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
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Default Not Nailed Down

On Jul 18, 11:00*am, samsloan wrote:

It is not my job to educate the Great Unwashed Masses about the
copyright laws, but let me give you a hint.

Copyright laws changed in 1978. John Steinbeck died in 1968.


And it covered copyrights still in effect at the time the law was
passed.
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Old July 18th 11, 04:23 PM posted to rec.arts.movies.current-films,alt.cult-movies,rec.arts.movies.past-films,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
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Default Not Nailed Down

On Jul 18, 8:05*am, None wrote:
On Jul 18, 11:00*am, samsloan wrote:

It is not my job to educate the Great Unwashed Masses about the
copyright laws, but let me give you a hint.


Copyright laws changed in 1978. John Steinbeck died in 1968.


And it covered copyrights still in effect at the time the law was
passed.


Again, my job is not to educate you. Stick to accounting. Stay away
from chess, as it is clearly not your game.

The article contains the following remarkable quote:

Meanwhile, Stephen Joyce, James Joyce's sole living descendant, fights
constantly with academics over the permissible use of passages from
his grandfather's works, including Ulysses and Finnegan's Wake.
According to this week's New Yorker magazine, he told one scholar:
"You should consider a new career as a garbage collector, because
you'll never quote a Joyce text again."

In reality, Ulysses was written and published before 1920. There is no
copyright on it as copyrights do not go back that far. The only book
by James Joyce that could possibly be protected by copyright is
Finnegan's Wake because it was published in 1939.

Note that the article you cite was published in 2006 yet all these
books are still being published with no changes.

Sam Sloan

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871878996
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871878999
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