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Old February 28th 04, 05:54 AM
Martin Wilber
 
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Default Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller

I was browsing the chess book section of the bookstore and read a
comment in one book that when looking for a chess book, find one that
has a high number of words to moves. Coincidentally I found next to it
"Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller".

If anyone is looking for a good book on Fischer's games this book is
definitely worth buying. Schiller starts each game with a lesson to be
learned from the game. His commentary is insightful and the games are
very interesting. There is at least one position diagram on each page
so it is easy to follow the games.

Marty
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Old February 28th 04, 06:57 AM
LeModernCaveman
 
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Default Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller

I was browsing the chess book section of the bookstore and read a
comment in one book that when looking for a chess book, find one that
has a high number of words to moves. Coincidentally I found next to it
"Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller".

If anyone is looking for a good book on Fischer's games this book is
definitely worth buying. Schiller starts each game with a lesson to be
learned from the game. His commentary is insightful and the games are
very interesting. There is at least one position diagram on each page
so it is easy to follow the games.


I always found those "Fischer worship" books to have the same theme.

The main "lesson" is that Fischer kicked the living **** out of everything they
put in his path, because he had great talent and busted his ass all day and
night for most of his life with a determination that mere mortals (i.e., the
readers) could never muster in a million years.


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Old February 28th 04, 01:45 PM
Martin Wilber
 
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Default Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller

I didn't find the same lesson in the book.

The book is over 200 pages long. There are only four pages covering
Fischer's history. Other than that, the game commentary barely even
mentions Fischer other than telling you he was playing white or black.

The focus of the book is what can be learned from his games. The first
lesson illustrated using "The Game of the Century" are the rules to
follow in the opening, the second is "Controlling the center helps when
you attack on the flank... etc. etc".

It's possible to enjoy his games and learn something from them without
falling into hero worship mode.

Marty

In article ,
says...
I was browsing the chess book section of the bookstore and read a
comment in one book that when looking for a chess book, find one that
has a high number of words to moves. Coincidentally I found next to it
"Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller".

If anyone is looking for a good book on Fischer's games this book is
definitely worth buying. Schiller starts each game with a lesson to be
learned from the game. His commentary is insightful and the games are
very interesting. There is at least one position diagram on each page
so it is easy to follow the games.


I always found those "Fischer worship" books to have the same theme.

The main "lesson" is that Fischer kicked the living **** out of everything they
put in his path, because he had great talent and busted his ass all day and
night for most of his life with a determination that mere mortals (i.e., the
readers) could never muster in a million years.



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Old February 28th 04, 07:04 PM
Paul Rubin
 
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Default Learn From Bobby Fischer's Greatest Games by Eric Schiller

Martin Wilber writes:
The book is over 200 pages long. There are only four pages covering
Fischer's history. Other than that, the game commentary barely even
mentions Fischer other than telling you he was playing white or black.

The focus of the book is what can be learned from his games. The first
lesson illustrated using "The Game of the Century" are the rules to
follow in the opening, the second is "Controlling the center helps when
you attack on the flank... etc. etc".

It's possible to enjoy his games and learn something from them without
falling into hero worship mode.


This book sounds like it could have been written about just about any
selection of decent games. There's nothing Ficher-specific about it
at that level. So bringing in Fischer is somewhat gratuitous and is
selling the book by playing on hero worship in a rather pure form.
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