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Old September 4th 11, 12:13 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.

The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.
These games are won because I knew the opening better than my
opponent. They were busted and down material before the middle game
even started.

[Date "2011.06.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Expert`"]
[Black "NoneB"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B47"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qc7 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. f4
$4 Nxd4 9. e5 Nxe2+ 10. Qxe2 Ng8 11. Ne4 d5 12. exd6 Bxd6 13. Be3 Be7
14. Qg4
g6 15. Bd4 e5 16. Qd1 exd4 17. Qxd4 f6 18. Rf3 Bd7 19. Rc3 Qxf4 20.
Re1 Be6
21. Rf3 Qc7 22. Nxf6+ Nxf6 23. Rxf6 Rd8 24. Qf2 Bc5 25. Rfxe6+ Kd7 26.
Re7+
Bxe7 27. Qf7 Qb6+ 28. Kh1 Qf6 29. Qc4 Rhf8 0-1

Not sure of the idea behind 15. Bd4

[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 d6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O
Nge7 8.
Qe2 Ng6 9. Be3 Be7 10. Rac1 O-O 11. a3 a6 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. f4 b5 14.
Bd3 Bf6 15.
Nf3 Qe7 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. Qf2 Nf8 18. g3 b4 19. axb4 Nxb4 20. Bb1 g6
21. Rd2
Rab8 22. Rcd1 d5 23. Bc5 Qd8 24. exd5 Bxc3 25. bxc3 Nxd5 26. c4 Nc3
27. Bd3
Nxd1 28. Rxd1 Qc8 29. Qd4 Ba4 30. Ra1 Rd8 31. Qe3 Rxd3 0-1

Crushed in his own opening

Have fun Phil. Show us your OTB games.





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Old September 4th 11, 01:55 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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Posts: 1,329
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins


Stan, it's certainly possible to win games through better opening
preparation. Heck, in a barroom skittles game I once had an opponent
fall into the old Petroff trap: 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 Nxe4 4.Qe2
Nf6?? 5.Nc6+ and wins.
And here, in a less extreme example, I correctly predicted what
opening my opponent would play, was able to prepare for it, refuted
his gambit, and used only 6 minutes for my first 19 moves, the first
17 of which were pure book:

[Event "Maine Open"]
[Site "Portland, MN"]
[Date "1998.10.18"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Tracy, Richard"]
[Black "Kingston, Taylor"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]
[WhiteElo "1774"]
[BlackElo "1789"]
[PlyCount "78"]
[EventDate "1998.10.18"]
[EventRounds "5"]
[SourceDate "2011.09.03"]

1. e4 c5 2. d4 cxd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. h3 e6 9. Qe2 Be7 10. Rd1 Bd7 11. Bf4 b5 12. Bb3 Qb8 13. e5 dxe5
14. Nxe5 Nxe5 15. Bxe5 Qb7 16. Bxf6 Bxf6 17. Ne4 Be7 18. Nd6+ Bxd6 19.
Rxd6 O-O 20. Qd3 Bc6 21. Bc2 g6 22. Qg3 Rfd8 23. Rad1 Rxd6 24. Rxd6
Bd5 25. h4 Qc8 26. Bd3 Qc1+ 27. Kh2 Qxb2 28. h5 Qg7 29. hxg6 hxg6 30.
Rd7 Rc8 31. Rc7 Rxc7 32. Qxc7 Qh8+ 33. Kg3 Qd4 34. Bxg6 fxg6 35. Qd8+
Kh7 36. Qe7+ Kh6 37. Qf8+ Qg7 38. Qf4+ g5 39. Qe3 Qf6 0-1

BUT, on the other hand, I have sometimes come out of the opening
smelling like a rose, even a whole bouquet, yet still lost the game
because I couldn't handle the middle game complications or pursued the
wrong strategy. So one should not count on opening theory to be a
golden path to victory. It's just one part of proper chess study.


On Sep 3, 4:13*pm, None wrote:
Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.

The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.
These games are won because I knew the opening better than my
opponent. They were busted and down material before the middle game
even started.

[Date "2011.06.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Expert`"]
[Black "NoneB"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B47"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qc7 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. f4
$4 Nxd4 9. e5 Nxe2+ 10. Qxe2 Ng8 11. Ne4 d5 12. exd6 Bxd6 13. Be3 Be7
14. Qg4
g6 15. Bd4 *e5 16. Qd1 exd4 17. Qxd4 f6 18. Rf3 Bd7 19. Rc3 Qxf4 20.
Re1 Be6
21. Rf3 Qc7 22. Nxf6+ Nxf6 23. Rxf6 Rd8 24. Qf2 Bc5 25. Rfxe6+ Kd7 26.
Re7+
Bxe7 27. Qf7 Qb6+ 28. Kh1 Qf6 29. Qc4 Rhf8 0-1

Not sure of the idea behind 15. Bd4

[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 d6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O
Nge7 8.
Qe2 Ng6 9. Be3 Be7 10. Rac1 O-O 11. a3 a6 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. f4 b5 14.
Bd3 Bf6 15.
Nf3 Qe7 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. Qf2 Nf8 18. g3 b4 19. axb4 Nxb4 20. Bb1 g6
21. Rd2
Rab8 22. Rcd1 d5 23. Bc5 Qd8 24. exd5 Bxc3 25. bxc3 Nxd5 26. c4 Nc3
27. Bd3
Nxd1 28. Rxd1 Qc8 29. Qd4 Ba4 30. Ra1 Rd8 31. Qe3 Rxd3 0-1

Crushed in his own opening

Have fun Phil. Show us your OTB games.


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Old September 4th 11, 02:57 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2011
Posts: 1,329
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 3, 4:13*pm, None wrote:

Stan, this game is not very good support for your thesis. White
played the opening halfway decently here, and the first major mistakes
were yours:

[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 d6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O
Nge7 8. Qe2 Ng6 9. Be3 Be7 10. Rac1 O-O 11. a3 a6 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. f4
b5 14. Bd3 Bf6 15. Nf3 Qe7 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. Qf2 Nf8?? 18. g3?!

You needed to play something like 17...Rec8 here. White missed
18.e5! dxe5 19.Be4! Rac8 (if 19... exf4 20. Bc5 Qd8 21. Bxc6 etc.) 20.
Bxc6 Bxc6 21. fxe5 and the Bf6 is lost.

18... b4 19. axb4 Nxb4?? 20. 20. Bb1?!


He still doesn't see it. 20.e5! still wins.

20...g6?? 21. Rd2


He /*still*/ doesn't see it! 21.e5! Bg7 (or 21... dxe5 22. fxe5 Bg7
23. Bc5) 22. exd6 Qd8 23. Bb6 Qc8 24. Na2 Nc6 (24... Nxa2?? 25. Rxc8)
25. Be4 and wins.

21...Rab8 22. Rcd1


Good grief! 22.e5 still wins at least a pawn.

22... d5 23. Bc5 Qd8 24. exd5?!


Missing probably the last chance for advantage with 24.Ne5.

24...Bxc3 25. bxc3 Nxd5 26. c4? (better 26.bd4) 26... Nc3 27. Bd3 Nxd1
28. Rxd1 Qc8 29. Qd4??

Better 29.Bd6.

29...Ba4 30. Ra1 Rd8 31. Qe3 Rxd3 0-1

Crushed in his own opening


Missing four winners and then blundering will do that to you.
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Old September 4th 11, 02:58 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 88
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 3, 6:13 pm, None wrote:
Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.

The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.
These games are won because I knew the opening better than my
opponent. They were busted and down material before the middle game
even started.

[Date "2011.06.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Expert`"]
[Black "NoneB"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B47"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qc7 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. f4
$4 Nxd4 9. e5 Nxe2+ 10. Qxe2 Ng8 11. Ne4 d5 12. exd6 Bxd6 13. Be3 Be7
14. Qg4
g6 15. Bd4 e5 16. Qd1 exd4 17. Qxd4 f6 18. Rf3 Bd7 19. Rc3 Qxf4 20.
Re1 Be6
21. Rf3 Qc7 22. Nxf6+ Nxf6 23. Rxf6 Rd8 24. Qf2 Bc5 25. Rfxe6+ Kd7 26.
Re7+
Bxe7 27. Qf7 Qb6+ 28. Kh1 Qf6 29. Qc4 Rhf8 0-1

Not sure of the idea behind 15. Bd4


8.f4 is a tactical blunder any Class 'C' player should be able to see.
Having a bare king on the g1-a7 diagonal is a recipe for disaster. 8.
Be3 or even 8.Kh1 would have prevented it. One of the things that Dan
Heisman teaches is to quickly scan the board for any checks and
captures which might be dangerous before finally making a move. Yes,
it's the partial fault of a lack of opening knowledge.

[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 d6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O
Nge7 8.
Qe2 Ng6 9. Be3 Be7 10. Rac1 O-O 11. a3 a6 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. f4 b5 14.
Bd3 Bf6 15.
Nf3 Qe7 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. Qf2 Nf8 18. g3 b4 19. axb4 Nxb4 20. Bb1 g6
21. Rd2
Rab8 22. Rcd1 d5 23. Bc5 Qd8 24. exd5 Bxc3 25. bxc3 Nxd5 26. c4 Nc3
27. Bd3
Nxd1 28. Rxd1 Qc8 29. Qd4 Ba4 30. Ra1 Rd8 31. Qe3 Rxd3 0-1

Crushed in his own opening

Have fun Phil. Show us your OTB games.


Starting with move 18., White missed multiple tactical chances to win
material by 18. e5, a relatively easy move to see and quite thematic
in these types positions. White makes all the correct preparations for
e5 and then lets Black off the hook.

Black's move 29....Ba4 was very good and sealed the win.

Congratulations on these wins.

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Old September 4th 11, 03:04 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 88
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

Way back in 1970ish, I drew IM Julio Kaplan with a prepared variation
in the Sicilian Defense I had seen in Chess Life. I forget what it was
right now, but it certainly was a thrill to get a draw. In our first
tournament game, back in 1967, I think, he crushed me.


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Old September 4th 11, 06:08 AM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,146
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 3, 7:13*pm, None wrote:

Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.



Are you trying to suggest that not studying the openings by rote
somehow led to the early demise of these oft-quoted pundits? Surely,
just being mortal and having been born in an earlier time is no great
crime in itself. Nor can we blame the messengers who merely 'relay'
the proven fact that tactics beat strategy, just as beans always beat
cornbread in a fight.


The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.



Generally, an OTB tournament consists of around four or five rounds,
not only two. May we assume then that in those 'other' games, the
ones you have deliberately omitted here, the outcomes were mainly
decided by tactical errors (or perhaps even a forfeit or a flag-fall)?


These games are won because I knew the opening better than my
opponent. They were busted and down material before the middle game
even started.

[Date "2011.06.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Expert`"]
[Black "NoneB"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B47"]

1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qc7 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. f4



A crude tactical error -- just as we expected. Game over. That
leaves only the next game if you hope to somehow show how 'strategy'
is more important than 'tactics.'



[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3



Here we go again! It is obvious that in order to regain the loss
of a pawn, White must recapture on d4.

These simple *tactical* errors are indeed good evidence of the
dominance of tactics over strategy, which I think must have been your
intended point in view of the course of the games you yourself
selected. You may have been a bit sloppy in your wording above,
apparently reversing two key terms, but the idea --of tactics
dominating strategy-- is clear enough from even a cursory examination
of the games by any player worth his salt.


Crushed in his own opening



Actually, no Class A player alive today can claim to have originated
this opening, for it was already played at least as far back as
Morphy's day. And simply hanging a pawn by forgetting to recapture
on d4 is insufficient to name a blunder for a mere Class A player
(though it might work in the case of a master).


I would like to point out the fact that at a recent tournament in
Indiana, a local Expert (whose rating seems on the upswing) committed
this very same blunder against NM Michael Wiseman. A master
tactician, Wiseman snatched the free pawn and mopped up, just as we
might expect. The lesson here is simply that you cannot play the
chess openings by rote! Instead it is necessary to always remain
alert, guarding against elementary tactical errors and exploiting
those of the opponent. Even the loss of a single pawn can be
decisive.

Glad to see someone posting their games here besides that notorious
patzer Phil Innes, and his pal Sam Sloan.


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Old September 4th 11, 01:55 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2007
Posts: 163
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 4, 6:08*am, The Master wrote:
On Sep 3, 7:13*pm, None wrote:
[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3


* Here we go again! * It is obvious that in order to regain the loss
of a pawn, White must recapture on d4.

* These simple *tactical* errors


Yes, you'd never see a master tactician like Tal playing a move like
that (http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1141196).
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Old September 4th 11, 05:25 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,073
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 4, 1:08*am, The Master wrote:
On Sep 3, 7:13*pm, None wrote:

Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.


* Are you trying to suggest that not studying the openings by rote
somehow led to the early demise of these oft-quoted pundits? *Surely,
just being mortal and having been born in an earlier time is no great
crime in itself. *Nor can we blame the messengers who merely 'relay'
the proven fact that tactics beat strategy, just as beans always beat
cornbread in a fight.

The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.


* Generally, an OTB tournament consists of around four or five rounds,
not only two. *May we assume then that in those 'other' games, the
ones you have deliberately omitted here, the outcomes were mainly
decided by tactical errors (or perhaps even a forfeit or a flag-fall)?

These games are won because I knew the opening better than my
opponent. They were busted and down material before the middle game
even started.


[Date "2011.06.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Expert`"]
[Black "NoneB"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B47"]


1. Nf3 c5 2. e4 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Qc7 5. Nc3 e6 6. Be2 a6 7. O-O
Nf6 8. f4


* A crude tactical error -- just as we expected. *Game over. *That
leaves only the next game if you hope to somehow show how 'strategy'
is more important than 'tactics.'


Crude, crude? That was the point of Nc6. Anyway, Christmas came early
this year. Only ever happened OTB once before but as one might guess,
it happens a lot in blitz.

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Old September 4th 11, 05:45 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,073
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 4, 1:08*am, The Master wrote:
On Sep 3, 7:13*pm, None wrote:

Some think tactics are more important than strategy. They coin cliches
about "rote memorization" and quote a bunch of dead guys who
recommended that you study tactics first.


* Are you trying to suggest that not studying the openings by rote
somehow led to the early demise of these oft-quoted pundits? *Surely,
just being mortal and having been born in an earlier time is no great
crime in itself. *Nor can we blame the messengers who merely 'relay'
the proven fact that tactics beat strategy, just as beans always beat
cornbread in a fight.


These guys didn't know openings from a hole in the ground. Look at
guys like Nimzobitch and Rossolimbo. They didn't know that you must
develop knights beforew bishops and you never trade off your bishop
early on. You're opponent will have the two bishops and therefore a
won game.

The following two games from a recent OTB tournament make my point.


* Generally, an OTB tournament consists of around four or five rounds,
not only two. *May we assume then that in those 'other' games, the
ones you have deliberately omitted here, the outcomes were mainly
decided by tactical errors (or perhaps even a forfeit or a flag-fall)?


Well you sure are a pain in the ass. If you really must see more, here
is the third round. I mean they made me play another damn expert. No
tactics here, just a book draw.

[Date "2011.07.07"]
[Round "3"]
[White "None"]
[Black "Expert"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "D78"]

1. d4 d5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. c4 c6 4. g3 g6 5. Bg2 Bg7 6. O-O O-O 7. Qc2 Bf5
8. Qb3
Qb6 9. Qa3 Re8 10. c5 Qa6 11. Re1 Qxa3 12. Nxa3 Nbd7 13. b4 e5 14.
dxe5 Ng4 15.
Bb2 Ngxe5 16. Nd4 a5 17. b5 Nxc5 18. Rac1 Ned3 19. exd3 Nxd3 20. Rxe8+
Rxe8 21.
Nxf5 Bxb2 22. Rd1 Re1+ 23. Rxe1 Nxe1 24. Ne7+ (24. bxc6 bxc6 25. Ne7+)
24...
Kf8 25. Nxc6 {the point of 7. Qc2} bxc6 26. bxc6 Ke7 27. Nb5 Nxg2 28.
Kxg2 g5
29. c7 Kd7 30. c8=Q+ Kxc8 31. Nd6+ Kd7 32. Nxf7 Bf6 33. f4 gxf4 34.
gxf4 Ke6
35. Nh6 Bg7 36. Ng4 d4 37. Kf3 Kf5 38. Nf2 Bf8 39. Nd3 Bd6 40. a4 Bc7
41. h3
Bd6 42. h4 h5 43. Nc1 Bb4 44. Nb3 Bc3 45. Nc5 Be1 46. Nb3 d3 47. Nd4+
Kf6 48.
Ke3 d2 49. Ke2 Bxh4 50. Kxd2 Bf2 51. Nc6 Bb6 52. Ke2 Ke6 53. Kf3 Kd6
54. Nxa5
Bxa5 1/2-1/2

The problem with playing one game a week is that you can't always be
in your best form every week. Life has an annoying habit of creeping
in and leaving you with ten pounds of stress in a five pound bag.

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Old September 4th 11, 05:59 PM posted to rec.games.chess.misc,rec.games.chess.politics
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,073
Default Study openings because that is where the game begins

On Sep 3, 9:57*pm, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Sep 3, 4:13*pm, None wrote:

* Stan, this game is not very good support for your thesis. White
played the opening halfway decently here, and the first major mistakes
were yours:

[Date "2011.06.23"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Class A"]
[Black "None"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B21"]


1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. c3 dxc3 5. Nxc3 d6 6. Bc4 e6 7. O-O
Nge7 8. Qe2 Ng6 9. Be3 Be7 10. Rac1 O-O 11. a3 a6 12. Nd2 Bd7 13. f4
b5 14. Bd3 Bf6 15. Nf3 Qe7 16. Rfd1 Rfe8 17. Qf2 Nf8?? 18. g3?!

* You needed to play something like 17...Rec8 here. White missed
18.e5! dxe5 19.Be4! Rac8 (if 19... exf4 20. Bc5 Qd8 21. Bxc6 etc.) 20.
Bxc6 Bxc6 21. fxe5 and the Bf6 is lost.


Well I think his g3 was a setup for your suggestion. He coulda trapped
my bishop. But he probably forgot his pocket Fritz that night.
As it is, my 17th move means I can't be mated... sometimes.

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