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Old September 26th 11, 12:20 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in Americaby Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America

by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

Introduction by Sam Sloan

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873145

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC. The South would have won the War, Lincoln would have been captured
or killed and the country would have remained divided. The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.

Instead, Lee lost and decided to retreat back to Virginia. These
events have been hotly debated ever since and will always be debated,
long after all of us are dead.

I was born in Richmond Virginia and I attended JEB Stuart Elementary
School located at 3101 Fendall Avenue in Richmond VA. The school,
which is still there, is named after the famous Civil War General
J.E.B. Stuart, who distinguished himself during and after the Battle
of Gettysburg mainly by twice encircling the Union Troops.

I well remember my 5th grade teacher at JEB Stuart School, Miss Bass,
telling the class that the Confederacy lost the Battle of Gettysburg
because General Longstreet failed to obey Lee's Orders. Lee ordered
Longstreet to attack on July 1, but Longstreet did not do so. Then Lee
ordered Longstreet to attack on July 2, but again Longstreet did not
do so. Finally, Lee ordered Longstreet to attack on July 3. This time
Longstreet finally attacked but the result was Picket's Charge in
which the Confederate Army was repulsed and defeated.

So, according to my teacher, Miss Bass, it was all because of General
Longstreet's refusal to obey orders that the charge was lost, the
battle was lost, the war was lost and our country was lost.

You can read in this book the running debate that is still going on
today about Lee and Longstreet and why this battle was lost and whose
fault it was.

However, I just discovered a side issue which as far as I can tell in
all the reprints and discussions about this famous book has never been
discussed or even come up. That concerns the identity of the author.

The author is listed as “Comte de Paris”. This is a strange name for
the author of a book about the American Civil, or “The War Between the
States” as it is still called in the South.

How many people here know who “Comte de Paris” was? Think about and
then turn the page to find out. See if you can guess it right.

Comte De Paris was actually THE KING OF FRANCE.

Of course, if you were French you probably knew that, but hardly
anybody else does.

During the time that the Comte de Paris was the King of France, the
French kings had the unfortunate tendency to lose their heads to the
guillotine. This indeed had happened to the great-grandfather of Comte
de Paris, who had his head chopped off on November 6, 1793. Therefore,
when Comte de Paris became the legal King of France, he decided that
it would be a really good idea that, rather than assume the crown, he
would take a little trip and go to see America.

The Monarchists back in France give him a title, King Philippe VII,
but he never called himself that title. As you will see in this book,
he signs his name “L. P. d'Orleans, Comte de Paris”.

Nevertheless, he was the King of France, although he never ruled, not
entirely unlike the present Queen Elizabeth of England, who does not
rule either.

France, of course, still has a king. Note the “of course”. The Current
King of France is “Henry, Comte de Paris”. Notice that he still uses
the same title. He was born on June 14, 1933 in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre,
Belgium.

The last king to actually rule France was Louis Phillipe I, who was
born October 6, 1773 and died August 26, 1850. His father died on the
guillotine, but he had escaped to Italy. He spent more than twenty
years on the run, living under assumed names, traveling as a homeless
vagabond and fathering at least two children on the way, even reaching
America, while a throng searched for him, trying to chop off his head
too. One of his illegitimate children was Erik Wolhbom, who was born
in Sweden and is now the patriarch of the Kolstrøm Family. He regained
power on August 9 1830 when the French National Assembly declared him
Louis-Philippe I, King of the French. He ruled from 1830 to 1848, when
he abdicated in favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the
author of this book.

On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe abdicated in favour of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of this
book. He lived out the last two years of his life in England before
dying in 1850.

The eldest son of Louis Phillipe I was Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans,
who was born 3 September 1810 and died on 13 July 1842 in a carriage
accident and thus never got to rule.

Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans had two sons, Louis Philippe d'Orleans,
the author of this book, “The Battle of Gettysburg”, and Robert. Both
Louis and Robert when to America, enlisted in the Union Army and
fought on the Union Side in the American Civil War, along with their
uncle François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, Prince de
Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900), the third son of Louis
Philippe I, King of the French.

I can just imagine the conversation now: Louis and Robert are hunkered
down behind a wall, bayonets drawn and waiting for Picket's charge,
while a bunch of other bedraggled Union soldiers are waiting behind
the wall with them.

Louis says to his comrades, “By the way, I am the King of France”.

A Union soldier says, “Yea. And I am Napoleon Bonaparte”.

Robert, heir apparent to the throne, says, “I knew Napoleon Bonaparte
well and you are no Napoleon Bonaparte”, (taking a line from Ronald
Reagan).

The Union soldier says, “Yea, you're right. I'm his girlfriend
Josephine. Hee Hee”.

The Union soldier says to the others, “Hey guys. We have a bunch of
crazy Frenchmen down here behind this wall with us who says they are
the Kings of France! Let's hump 'em.”

Actually, Louis and Robert did not serve in the Battle of Gettysburg,
but they did serve in other battles leading up to it. Robert fought in
the Battle of Gaines's Mill, sometimes known as the First Battle of
Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy River, which took place on
June 27, 1862 near Richmond, Virginia. This battle resulted in a
Confederate victory with great loss of life on the Union side and it
was fortunate that Robert, Heir Apparent to the King of France, his
brother, survived the battle.

The two brothers had joined the Union Army subject to the condition
that they could quit at any time and go back home. They did that, but
as they were prohibited from returning to France, they went to England
where they both quickly got married and produced children. Louis, the
author of this book, had eight children and Robert had five. Following
in the tradition of members of the Royal Family of Europe marrying
each other, the daughter of Louis, Isabelle, who was born May 7, 1878
and died April 21, 1961, married the son of Robert, Jean, who was born
September 4, 1874 and died August 25, 1940.

Their son was Henri, Comte de Paris, who was born July 5, 1908 and
died June 19, 1999. His son, also named Henri, Comte de Paris, was
born on June 14, 1933 and is now the King of France, according to the
Royalists in France.

There were two branches of the French Royal Family who claimed the
right to rule. This dispute was settled to some extent when one branch
of the family died out. The last surviving member of that branch was
“King” Henry V, Henri, comte de Chambord (Henri Charles Ferdinand
Marie Dieudonné d'Artois, duc de Bordeaux) who was born 29 September
1820 and died 24 August 1883. As he had no children, the other branch,
now represented by the current Henri, Comte de Paris, was born on June
14, 1933, is the only still living branch who claims the right to rule
should the Royal Family ever regain power.

Do not think this is impossible. Not only did the Royal Family of
Spain regain power in Spain long after being deposed, but the King of
Bulgaria was elected the Prime Minister of Bulgaria after the Soviet
dominated rule of Bulgaria collapsed in the 1990s.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873145
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Old September 26th 11, 05:31 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
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On Sep 26, 7:20*am, samsloan wrote:
The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America

by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

Introduction by Sam Sloan

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...SBN=4871873145

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC. The South would have won the War, Lincoln would have been captured
or killed and the country would have remained divided. The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.

Instead, Lee lost and decided to retreat back to Virginia. These
events have been hotly debated ever since and will always be debated,
long after all of us are dead.

I was born in Richmond Virginia and I attended JEB Stuart Elementary
School located at 3101 Fendall Avenue in Richmond VA. The school,
which is still there, is named after the famous Civil War General
J.E.B. Stuart, who distinguished himself during and after the Battle
of Gettysburg mainly by twice encircling the Union Troops.

I well remember my 5th grade teacher at JEB Stuart School, Miss Bass,
telling the class that the Confederacy lost the Battle of Gettysburg
because General Longstreet failed to obey Lee's Orders. Lee ordered
Longstreet to attack on July 1, but Longstreet did not do so. Then Lee
ordered Longstreet to attack on July 2, but again Longstreet did not
do so. Finally, Lee ordered Longstreet to attack on July 3. This time
Longstreet finally attacked but the result was Picket's Charge in
which the Confederate Army was repulsed and defeated.

So, according to my teacher, Miss Bass, it was all because of General
Longstreet's refusal to obey orders that the charge was lost, the
battle was lost, the war was lost and our country was lost.

You can read in this book the running debate that is still going on
today about Lee and Longstreet and why this battle was lost and whose
fault it was.

However, I just discovered a side issue which as far as I can tell in
all the reprints and discussions about this famous book has never been
discussed or even come up. That concerns the identity of the author.

The author is listed as “Comte de Paris”. This is a strange name for
the author of a book about the American Civil, or “The War Between the
States” as it is still called in the South.

How many people here know who “Comte de Paris” was? Think about and
then turn the page to find out. See if you can guess it right.

Comte De Paris was actually THE KING OF FRANCE.

Of course, if you were French you probably knew that, but hardly
anybody else does.

During the time that the Comte de Paris was the King of France, the
French kings had the unfortunate tendency to lose their heads to the
guillotine. This indeed had happened to the great-grandfather of Comte
de Paris, who had his head chopped off on November 6, 1793. Therefore,
when Comte de Paris became the legal King of France, he decided that
it would be a really good idea that, rather than assume the crown, he
would take a little trip and go to see America.

The Monarchists back in France give him a title, King Philippe VII,
but he never called himself that title. As you will see in this book,
he signs his name “L. P. d'Orleans, Comte de Paris”.

Nevertheless, he was the King of France, although he never ruled, not
entirely unlike the present Queen Elizabeth of England, who does not
rule either.

France, of course, still has a king. Note the “of course”. The Current
King of France is “Henry, Comte de Paris”. Notice that he still uses
the same title. He was born on June 14, 1933 in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre,
Belgium.

The last king to actually rule France was Louis Phillipe I, who was
born October 6, 1773 and died August 26, 1850. His father died on the
guillotine, but he had escaped to Italy. He spent more than twenty
years on the run, living under assumed names, traveling as a homeless
vagabond and fathering at least two children on the way, even reaching
America, while a throng searched for him, trying to chop off his head
too. One of his illegitimate children was Erik Wolhbom, who was born
in Sweden and is now the patriarch of the Kolstrøm Family. He regained
power on August 9 1830 when the French National Assembly declared him
Louis-Philippe I, King of the French. He ruled from 1830 to 1848, when
he abdicated in favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the
author of this book.

On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe abdicated in favour of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of this
book. He lived out the last two years of his life in England before
dying in 1850.

The eldest son of Louis Phillipe I was Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans,
who was born 3 September 1810 and died on 13 July 1842 in a carriage
accident and thus never got to rule.

Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans had two sons, Louis Philippe d'Orleans,
the author of this book, “The Battle of Gettysburg”, and Robert. Both
Louis and Robert when to America, enlisted in the Union Army and
fought on the Union Side in the American Civil War, along with their
uncle François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, Prince de
Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900), the third son of Louis
Philippe I, King of the French.

I can just imagine the conversation now: Louis and Robert are hunkered
down behind a wall, bayonets drawn and waiting for Picket's charge,
while a bunch of other bedraggled Union soldiers are waiting behind
the wall with them.

Louis says to his comrades, “By the way, I am the King of France”.

A Union soldier says, “Yea. And I am Napoleon Bonaparte”.

Robert, heir apparent to the throne, says, “I knew Napoleon Bonaparte
well and you are no Napoleon Bonaparte”, (taking a line from Ronald
Reagan).

The Union soldier says, “Yea, you're right. I'm his girlfriend
Josephine. Hee Hee”.

The Union soldier says to the others, “Hey guys. We have a bunch of
crazy Frenchmen down here behind this wall with us who says they are
the Kings of France! Let's hump 'em.”

Actually, Louis and Robert did not serve in the Battle of Gettysburg,
but they did serve in other battles leading up to it. Robert fought in
the Battle of Gaines's Mill, sometimes known as the First Battle of
Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy River, which took place on
June 27, 1862 near Richmond, Virginia. This battle resulted in a
Confederate victory with great loss of life on the Union side and it
was fortunate that Robert, Heir Apparent to the King of France, his
brother, survived the battle.

The two brothers had joined the Union Army subject to the condition
that they could quit at any time and go back home. They did that, but
as they were prohibited from returning to France, they went to England
where they both quickly got married and produced children. Louis, the
author of this book, had eight children and Robert had five. Following
in the tradition of members of the Royal Family of Europe marrying
each other, the daughter of Louis, Isabelle, who was born May 7, 1878
and died April 21, 1961, married the son of Robert, Jean, who was born
September 4, 1874 and died August 25, 1940.

Their son was Henri, Comte de Paris, who was born July 5, 1908 and
died June 19, 1999. His son, also named Henri, Comte de Paris, was
born on June 14, 1933 and is now the King of France, according to the
Royalists in France.

There were two branches of the French Royal Family who claimed the
right to rule. This dispute was settled to some extent when one branch
of the family died out. The last surviving member of that branch was
“King” Henry V, Henri, comte de Chambord (Henri Charles Ferdinand
Marie Dieudonné d'Artois, duc de Bordeaux) who was born 29 September
1820 and died 24 August 1883. As he had no children, the other branch,
now represented by the current Henri, Comte de Paris, was born on June
14, 1933, is the only still living branch who claims the right to rule
should the Royal Family ever regain power.

Do not think this is impossible. Not only did the Royal Family of
Spain regain power in Spain long after being deposed, but the King of
Bulgaria was elected the Prime Minister of Bulgaria after the Soviet
dominated rule of Bulgaria collapsed in the 1990s.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...SBN=4871873145


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Old September 26th 11, 05:44 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2011
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

On Sep 26, 4:20*am, samsloan wrote:
The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America

Introduction by Sam Sloan

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC.


Nonsense. That would have required Lee to split his forces in two,
marching one group about 75 miles south to Washington, the other 125
miles east to Philadelphia, fighting through enemy territory every
step of the way. Even if Lee had taken Gettysburg without a single
casualty, such a maneuver would have been next to impossible. To
consider it after losing thousands of men, even in victory, would have
been madness.

The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.


Right. That's why Lincoln called for enlistments and began
conscription, instituted a blockade of southern ports, greatly stepped
up arms production, and began military operations on numerous fronts.
This lack of interest explains why by July 1863 the North had hundreds
of thousands of men in uniform and were laying siege to the
Confederacy from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi.

the famous Civil War General
J.E.B. Stuart, who distinguished himself during and after the Battle
of Gettysburg mainly by twice encircling the Union Troops.


More nonsense. Stuart screwed up royally at Gettysburg, staying out
of contact and failing in his main responsibility, which was to keep
Lee apprised of enemy movements. Lee himself wrote "the absence of the
cavalry rendered it impossible to obtain accurate information. ... By
the route [Stuart] pursued, the Federal Army was interposed between
his command and our main body, preventing any communication with him
until his arrival at Carlisle."

Comte De Paris was actually THE KING OF FRANCE.


Yeah, Mark Twain wrote about him and the duke in "Huckleberry Finn."
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Old September 27th 11, 04:52 AM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Oct 2007
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On Sep 26, 12:31*pm, None wrote:
On Sep 26, 7:20*am, samsloan wrote:



The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America


by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France


Introduction by Sam Sloan


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...andnoble.com/b...


The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC. The South would have won the War, Lincoln would have been captured
or killed and the country would have remained divided. The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.


Instead, Lee lost and decided to retreat back to Virginia. These
events have been hotly debated ever since and will always be debated,
long after all of us are dead.


I was born in Richmond Virginia and I attended JEB Stuart Elementary
School located at 3101 Fendall Avenue in Richmond VA. The school,
which is still there, is named after the famous Civil War General
J.E.B. Stuart, who distinguished himself during and after the Battle
of Gettysburg mainly by twice encircling the Union Troops.


I well remember my 5th grade teacher at JEB Stuart School, Miss Bass,
telling the class that the Confederacy lost the Battle of Gettysburg
because General Longstreet failed to obey Lee's Orders. Lee ordered
Longstreet to attack on July 1, but Longstreet did not do so. Then Lee
ordered Longstreet to attack on July 2, but again Longstreet did not
do so. Finally, Lee ordered Longstreet to attack on July 3. This time
Longstreet finally attacked but the result was Picket's Charge in
which the Confederate Army was repulsed and defeated.


So, according to my teacher, Miss Bass, it was all because of General
Longstreet's refusal to obey orders that the charge was lost, the
battle was lost, the war was lost and our country was lost.


You can read in this book the running debate that is still going on
today about Lee and Longstreet and why this battle was lost and whose
fault it was.


However, I just discovered a side issue which as far as I can tell in
all the reprints and discussions about this famous book has never been
discussed or even come up. That concerns the identity of the author.


The author is listed as “Comte de Paris”. This is a strange name for
the author of a book about the American Civil, or “The War Between the
States” as it is still called in the South.


How many people here know who “Comte de Paris” was? Think about and
then turn the page to find out. See if you can guess it right.


Comte De Paris was actually THE KING OF FRANCE.


Of course, if you were French you probably knew that, but hardly
anybody else does.


During the time that the Comte de Paris was the King of France, the
French kings had the unfortunate tendency to lose their heads to the
guillotine. This indeed had happened to the great-grandfather of Comte
de Paris, who had his head chopped off on November 6, 1793. Therefore,
when Comte de Paris became the legal King of France, he decided that
it would be a really good idea that, rather than assume the crown, he
would take a little trip and go to see America.


The Monarchists back in France give him a title, King Philippe VII,
but he never called himself that title. As you will see in this book,
he signs his name “L. P. d'Orleans, Comte de Paris”.


Nevertheless, he was the King of France, although he never ruled, not
entirely unlike the present Queen Elizabeth of England, who does not
rule either.


France, of course, still has a king. Note the “of course”. The Current
King of France is “Henry, Comte de Paris”. Notice that he still uses
the same title. He was born on June 14, 1933 in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre,
Belgium.


The last king to actually rule France was Louis Phillipe I, who was
born October 6, 1773 and died August 26, 1850. His father died on the
guillotine, but he had escaped to Italy. He spent more than twenty
years on the run, living under assumed names, traveling as a homeless
vagabond and fathering at least two children on the way, even reaching
America, while a throng searched for him, trying to chop off his head
too. One of his illegitimate children was Erik Wolhbom, who was born
in Sweden and is now the patriarch of the Kolstrøm Family. He regained
power on August 9 1830 when the French National Assembly declared him
Louis-Philippe I, King of the French. He ruled from 1830 to 1848, when
he abdicated in favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the
author of this book.


On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe abdicated in favour of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of this
book. He lived out the last two years of his life in England before
dying in 1850.


The eldest son of Louis Phillipe I was Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans,
who was born 3 September 1810 and died on 13 July 1842 in a carriage
accident and thus never got to rule.


Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans had two sons, Louis Philippe d'Orleans,
the author of this book, “The Battle of Gettysburg”, and Robert. Both
Louis and Robert when to America, enlisted in the Union Army and
fought on the Union Side in the American Civil War, along with their
uncle François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, Prince de
Joinville (14 August 1818 - 16 June 1900), the third son of Louis
Philippe I, King of the French.


I can just imagine the conversation now: Louis and Robert are hunkered
down behind a wall, bayonets drawn and waiting for Picket's charge,
while a bunch of other bedraggled Union soldiers are waiting behind
the wall with them.


Louis says to his comrades, “By the way, I am the King of France”.


A Union soldier says, “Yea. And I am Napoleon Bonaparte”.


Robert, heir apparent to the throne, says, “I knew Napoleon Bonaparte
well and you are no Napoleon Bonaparte”, (taking a line from Ronald
Reagan).


The Union soldier says, “Yea, you're right. I'm his girlfriend
Josephine. Hee Hee”.


The Union soldier says to the others, “Hey guys. We have a bunch of
crazy Frenchmen down here behind this wall with us who says they are
the Kings of France! Let's hump 'em.”


Actually, Louis and Robert did not serve in the Battle of Gettysburg,
but they did serve in other battles leading up to it. Robert fought in
the Battle of Gaines's Mill, sometimes known as the First Battle of
Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy River, which took place on
June 27, 1862 near Richmond, Virginia. This battle resulted in a
Confederate victory with great loss of life on the Union side and it
was fortunate that Robert, Heir Apparent to the King of France, his
brother, survived the battle.


The two brothers had joined the Union Army subject to the condition
that they could quit at any time and go back home. They did that, but
as they were prohibited from returning to France, they went to England
where they both quickly got married and produced children. Louis, the
author of this book, had eight children and Robert had five. Following
in the tradition of members of the Royal Family of Europe marrying
each other, the daughter of Louis, Isabelle, who was born May 7, 1878
and died April 21, 1961, married the son of Robert, Jean, who was born
September 4, 1874 and died August 25, 1940.


Their son was Henri, Comte de Paris, who was born July 5, 1908 and
died June 19, 1999. His son, also named Henri, Comte de Paris, was
born on June 14, 1933 and is now the King of France, according to the
Royalists in France.


There were two branches of the French Royal Family who claimed the
right to rule. This dispute was settled to some extent when one branch
of the family died out. The last surviving member of that branch was
“King” Henry V, Henri, comte de Chambord (Henri Charles Ferdinand
Marie Dieudonné d'Artois, duc de Bordeaux) who was born 29 September
1820 and died 24 August 1883. As he had no children, the other branch,
now represented by the current Henri, Comte de Paris, was born on June
14, 1933, is the only still living branch who claims the right to rule
should the Royal Family ever regain power.


Do not think this is impossible. Not only did the Royal Family of
Spain regain power in Spain long after being deposed, but the King of
Bulgaria was elected the Prime Minister of Bulgaria after the Soviet
dominated rule of Bulgaria collapsed in the 1990s.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...oble.com/b...- Hide quoted text -


- Show quoted text -


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Old September 27th 11, 12:32 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Sep 2011
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

On Sep 26, 6:20*am, samsloan wrote:
The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America

by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

Introduction by Sam Sloan

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...SBN=4871873145

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC. The South would have won the War, Lincoln would have been captured
or killed and the country would have remained divided. The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.


IOW, everything I know about the Civil War I learned from Mike
Griffith.

Louis Phillippe Albert d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, was actually a
French nobleman who hung out with the Union Army, and is most notable
for his observations during the Peninsula Campaign. As far as the
rest of this highly amusing pack of lies...FAIL!


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Old September 27th 11, 02:00 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Winning lottery ticket system



On Sep 26, 7:20*am, samsloan wrote:


Spamspamspamspamspamspamspam
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Old September 27th 11, 07:17 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

Lee himself complained that it was in part because of JEB Stuart that
he lost the battle of Gettysburg as Stuart and his cavalry was on the
other side of the Battlefield and thus was out of communication.
However, Stuart is regarded as a hero by Virginians, as witnessed by
the fact that JEB Stuart School, the school I attended, was named and
is still named after him, there is a statue of JEB Stuart on horseback
on Monument Avenue in Richmond Virginia, and the infamous Watergate
Conspirator, Jeb Stuart Magruder is named after him.

There is a convention that if the statue of a horse has both front
legs in the air, the rider died in battle, one front leg up means the
rider was wounded in battle or died of battle wounds and if all four
hooves are on the ground, the rider died outside of battle. The statue
of Robert E. Lee has the horse with all four fee on the ground,
whereas the statues of Stonewall Jackson and JEB Stuart have a horse
with one foot off the ground, indicating that they died of wounds
sustained in battle.

Sam Sloan

On Sep 27, 4:32*am, Martin wrote:
On Sep 26, 6:20*am, samsloan wrote:


The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in America


by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France


Introduction by Sam Sloan


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873145h...andnoble.com/b...


The Battle of Gettysburg, fought on July 1-3, 1863, was the turning
point in the history of the United States of America. Had the Army of
Northern Virginia under General Robert E. Lee prevailed in this
battle, it is likely that the already demoralized Union Army would
have collapsed and Lee would have captured Philadelphia and Washington
DC. The South would have won the War, Lincoln would have been captured
or killed and the country would have remained divided. The North had
never really been that much interested in fighting this war, anyway.


IOW, everything I know about the Civil War I learned from Mike
Griffith.

Louis Phillippe Albert d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, was actually a
French nobleman who hung out with the Union Army, and is most notable
for his observations during the Peninsula Campaign. *As far as the
rest of this highly amusing pack of lies...FAIL!


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Old September 27th 11, 08:23 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

On Sep 27, 11:17*am, samsloan wrote:
Lee himself complained that it was in part because of JEB Stuart that
he lost the battle of Gettysburg as Stuart and his cavalry was on the
other side of the Battlefield and thus was out of communication.
However, Stuart is regarded as a hero by Virginians,


Yes, and Jubilation T. Cornpone was regarded as a hero by the
citizens of Dogpatch:

When we fought the Yankees
And annhihilation was near,
Who was it that led the charge
That took us straight to the rear?

Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone!
Unshaven and shorn-pone!
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Old September 28th 11, 06:26 AM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

On Sep 27, 12:23*pm, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Sep 27, 11:17*am, samsloan wrote:

Lee himself complained that it was in part because of JEB Stuart that
he lost the battle of Gettysburg as Stuart and his cavalry was on the
other side of the Battlefield and thus was out of communication.
However, Stuart is regarded as a hero by Virginians,


* Yes, and Jubilation T. Cornpone was regarded as a hero by the
citizens of Dogpatch:

When we fought the Yankees
And annhilation was near,
Who was it that led the charge
That took us straight to the rear?

Why it was Jubilation T. Cornpone!
Unshaven and shorn-pone!


Actually Jubal Early upon whom " Jubilation T. Cornpone!" is based is
the hero of Lynchburg Virginia because he really did save Lynchburg
from the Yankees in the Battle of Fort Hill making Lynchburg the only
major city in Virginia that was not taken by the Yankees during the
American Civil War.

Sam Sloan
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Old September 28th 11, 01:17 PM posted to soc.culture.usa,alt.war.civil.usa,soc.culture.french,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War inAmerica by Louis Philippe d'Orleans, Comte de Paris, Philippe VII of France

On Sep 28, 2:17*am, samsloan wrote:
Lee himself complained that it was in part because of JEB Stuart that
he lost the battle of Gettysburg as Stuart and his cavalry was on the
other side of the Battlefield and thus was out of communication.


Does Virginia celebrate MLK day now? Do they still show the
Confederate flag in the back window of pickup trucks, along with a gun
rack? They did back in the days when I lived in Leesburg...

I've heard the Lee himself lost Gettysburg as he ordered the fatal
frontal assault of Picket's Charge, which experience in Fredericksburg
when the Union did the same thing about 1.5 years earlier should have
taught Lee that such charges are suicidal for the offense. So Lee
deserves some blame for losing the war for the South. And you are
correct: many in the North were against going to war and from a
'counterfactual history' point of view it's interesting to speculate
what would have happened had the North lost and the USA been divided
into two countries. Possibly they would have gone to war later, or
perhaps coexisted like Germany and Austria.

RL
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