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Old November 8th 11, 01:52 AM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu
by
André Castelot
Introduction by Sam Sloan
The title of this book translates into English as “Louis-Philippe: The
Ignored”.

This is a suitable and appropriate title, because King Louis-Philippe
I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830 to 1848, has indeed
been ignored by history. Hardly anybody seems even to know that there
was such a king.

Even the biographies of him have been ignored. This book is not even
listed among the works of the famous biographer André Castelot. More
startling, Alexandre Dumas, one of the most famous authors of all
time, who wrote “The Three Muskateers”, “The Count of Monte Cristo”,
and “The Man in the Iron Mask”, also wrote a two-volume biography of
Louis-Philippe entitled “The Last King or the New France” and yet that
book is virtually unknown and unavailable. Ishi Press plans to print
it now.

Why would Ishi Press reprint three books about a man nobody ever heard
of?

The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power at the “King of the
French”.

That part of his life, which lasted 21 years but is hardly mentioned
by biographers André Castelot and Alexander Dumas, reminds me of the
song “Everglades”, made famous by the Kingston Trio, with the words
about how the events of history:

Sent him on the run through the Everglades
Runnin' like the dog through the Everglades
But he better keep movin' and don't stand still
If the skeeters don't get him then the gators will

Everybody has heard of King Louis XIV (1638-1715), King Louis XV
(1710-1774), famous for saying, “After Me, The Deluge”, and King Louis
XVI (1754 – 21 January 1793), who lost his head in the Deluge, as did
his wife, Marie Antoinette, who had her head chopped off on 16 October
1793.

To give an example of the broad reach of the Reign of Terror, the
great scientist, Antoine Lavoisier, who discovered oxygen and hydrogen
and devised the metric system that we use today, had his head chopped
off by the Guillotine on May 8, 1794. The judge who sentenced
Lavoisier to death is reported to have said, “The Revolution has no
need for geniuses.”

Except for those who have studied French history in detail, most
assume that these events plus the Reign of Terror and the rise of
Napoleon Bonaparte ended the French monarchy.

That is not true. The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe
II, Duke of Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called
himself Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6
November 1793 during the Reign of Terror.
Realizing that his life was in danger, Louis Philippe left France in
April, 1793 at age 19. He spent the next 21 years on the run. Louis
Philippe was forced to live in the shadows. He first moved to
Switzerland under an assumed name. His identity was discovered in
Zürich, where the Swiss authorities decreed that to protect Swiss
neutrality, Louis Philippe would have to leave the city. He went to
Zug, where Louis Philippe was discovered by a group of émigrés.

He sold all but one of his horses. Now moving from town to town
throughout Switzerland, he was refused entry to a monastery by monks
who believed him to be a young vagabonds. Another time, he woke up
after spending a night in a barn to find himself at the far end of a
musket, confronted by a man attempting to keep away thieves.
Throughout this period, he never stayed in one place more than 48
hours. Finally, in October 1793, Louis Philippe was appointed as a
teacher of French at a boys' boarding school in Italy. His salary was
1,400 francs and he taught under the name Monsieur Chabos. The
principal of the school must have thought that he spoke French rather
well for a homeless wanderer.
He had been at the school for a month when he heard the news from
Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6 November 1793 after a
trial before the revolutionary Tribunal.
In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl named
Marianne Banzori, a cook at the school. When it was discovered that
Marianne was pregnant, Louis Philippe lost his job as a teacher of
French. Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the child was born in
December 1794 and placed in an orphanage.
After that, Louis Philippe went to Scandinavia in 1795 and then to
Finland, where he knocked up another broad. In a remote village,
living under the name Müller, he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a
housekeeper. She got pregnant too and gave birth to a son, whom she
named Erik.
Louis Philippe visited the United States for four years, staying in
Philadelphia (where his brothers Antoine and Louis Charles were in
exile), New York City (where he most likely stayed at the Somerindyck
family estate on Broadway and 75th Street with other exiled princes),
and in Boston. In Boston, he taught French for a time and lived in
lodgings over what is now the Union Oyster House, Boston's oldest
restaurant. There is now a restaurant named “Lost Louie's” in his
memory.
During his time in the United States, Louis Philippe met with American
politicians, including George Clinton, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton,
and George Washington.
He was last king actually to rule France. He was born October 6, 1773
and died August 26, 1850. His father died on the guillotine, but he
had escaped to Italy. He spent more than twenty years on the run,
living under assumed names, traveling as a homeless vagabond and
fathering at least two children on the way. He even reached America,
all the while a mob searched for him back in France, trying to chop
off his head too.
One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named Marianne
Banzori and was born in Milan, Italy in 1794, given to an orphanage
for adoption and is presumed lost. Another was Erik Wolhbom, who was
born in 1796 in Muonio, Lappi, Suomi, Finland and is now the patriarch
of the Kolstrøm Family of Sweden.
Louis Phillipe I regained power on August 9, 1830, when the French
National Assembly declared him Louis-Philippe I, King of the French.
He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in favor
of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the book
“History of the Civil War in America”. On 24 February 1848, King Louis
Philippe I abdicated in favor of his nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book. He lived out the last
two years of his life in England before dying in 1850.
The eldest son of Louis Phillipe I was Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans,
who was born 3 September 1810 but died on 13 July 1842 in a carriage
accident and thus never got to rule. His son, Philippe d'Orléans,
Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September 1894) was the next king
but wisely thought to keep his head and did not claim the crown.
Instead, he went to America where he joined the Union Army and fought
in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where he wrote the book
“The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in
America”, also published by Ishi Press, ISBN 4871873145 .
Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about during the 21
years when he wandered from place to place, hiding from the mad throng
back in Paris that wanted to chop off his head. Even his baby children
had to be kept secret, as the throng would have killed them too had
they known about them. Thus, a child who might have been the rightful
King of France was given away for adoption as a safeguard.
France, of course, still has a king. Note the “of course”. The Current
King of France is “Henry, Comte de Paris”. Notice that he still uses
the same title. He was born on June 14, 1933 in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre,
Belgium.
However, there are at least two other claimants to be the Real King of
France, namely the descendants of Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid
he knocked up in Milan, and Erik Wolhbom, the son of Beata Caisa
Wahlbom.
The descendants of Erik Wolhbom in Finland have a website in which
they claim the Right to Rule France. It can be found in a search for
the Kolstrøm Family of Sweden.
There are a few problems with this. Two are that women are not allowed
to rule in France. Even the daughters of Princess Grace will not be
allowed to take power. This is in contrast to England, where the
greatest rulers have been women, Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) and
Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901).
Secondly, illegitimate children are not recognized as royalty by the
French, unlike the Scottish who recognize the ******* children of
their kings as Royal. (One branch of my own family claims descent from
an illegitimate child of a King of Scotland.)
The French kings especially had many illegitimate children and had
they been recognized as royalty that would have changed history.
André Castelot was a French writer, born in Belgium, who wrote 65
biographies of famous persons in the History of France. He is perhaps
best known for his biographies of Napoleon, of Josephine, and of
Marie Antoinette, Queen of France.
About Josephine, the Fort Wayne News Sentinel wrote: “From some of her
love letters newly found and or not published before, from intensive
reading of state documents and records and from thorough research in
the archives of many nations, Castelot reveals a brilliant study of
the passionate and elusive Empress. It is a rewarding trip through the
French Revolution and terror, a resume of the Directorate and a
revelation of the reign of the First Napoleon.”

Castelot's biography of Napoleon shows how his tumultuous relationship
with Josephine influenced and affected his Napoleonic Code. It was
because of Josephine's fickleness and unfaithfulness to Napoleon that
Napoleon decreed that all women upon leaving their father's houses and
entering into matrimony must understand that henceforth they are to be
under the control of their husbands. Women cannot be trusted to be
free, said Napoleon.

André Castelot was born André Storms on 23 January 1911 in Antwerp,
Belgium. He died on 18 July 2004 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, Paris, France.
He was a French writer and historian. He was the son of the Symbolist
painter Maurice Chabas and Gabrielle Storms-Castelot. It is possible
that his parents never married, as he took his mother's name of
Castelot. Perhaps this helps explain why his works emphasize illicit
and illegitimate relationships. It also makes for good literature.

Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
USA
November 7, 2011
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Old November 8th 11, 07:37 AM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Jun 2011
Posts: 49
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL

Sloan, this is great. It is the greatest introduction
to a book ever written. I admit that I have never
had the patience to read one of Sloan's introductions from
beginning to end, but even the first two paragraphs
suffice to establish that he is a humorist who could
easily have held his own in a tangle in
the alligator-infested swamps of the Mississippi
with Mark Twain.

In honor of this event, the publication by the greatest
publishing house in all of Alameda County, the Fishi Press,
of the greatest biography ever written, of the greatest
King of France in all of history, though totally unknown
in the Colonies, Fishi Press is considering the
republication of the greatest story ever told about
another Frog who is even less well known. I mean, of course,
the celebrated tale by the greatest humorist of his
and any other age,

Mark Twain: The Jumping Frog of Alameda County.

Introduction by Samuel Sloan, aka Dung Bee Tel, and Babelfish.


Louis-Philippe: Ignored by Andre Castelot Introduction by Sam Sloan the
title of this book translated into English as “a Louis-Philippe: Been
unaware of”. C' is adapted and the adapted title, because the King
Louis-Philippe I, king of the French, who ordered of 1830 to 1848, indeed
was unaware of by l' history. Hardly whoever even seems to know qu' there
was such a king. Even the biographies of him were ignored. This book n' is
not even enumerated among work of the biographer celebrates André Castelot.
More d' to frighten, dumas d' Alexandre, one of the most famous authors of
all times, which wrote “the three Muskateers”, “the account of Monte Cristo”,
and “l' man in the iron mask”, also wrote to a biography of two-volume of
Louis-Philippe entitled “the last king or new France” but this book is
practically unknown and inalienable. Plans of press d' Ishi for l' to print
now. Why the press d' Would Ishi reprint three books concerning a man nobody
ever heard speak? The answer is in special fascination that j' have with the
21 years Louis Philippe spent before qu' he gained the power with the “king
of the French”. This part of its life, which lasted 21 years but is hardly
mentioned by biographers André Castelot and the dumas d' Alexandre, points
out the song to me “marsh”, made famous for the trio of Kingston, with the
words about the way in which the events of l' history: Envoy him on the race
by the Runnin' marshes; ; as the dog by the marshes But it keeps movin'
better; ; and don' ; T are always held If the skeeters don' ; T l' obtain
whereas the gators Everyone heard of the King Louis XIV (1638-1715), the
King Louis XV (1710-1774), celebrates to say, “after me, the flood”, and the
King Louis XVI (1754 - January 21, 1793), who lost his head in the flood, of
the same qu' made its wife, Marie Antoinette, who had her head cut to far on
October 16, 1793. To give an example of the broad range of the reign of
terror, the large scientist, Antoine Lavoisier, who discovered l' oxygenate
and l' hydrogen and conceived the metric system which we employ aujourd'
today, made cut its head to far by the guillotine on May 8, 1794. The judge
who condemned One reports that Lavoisier with death indicates, “the
revolution n' no need for geniuses has. ” Except those which studied l'
French history in detail, more suppose that these events plus the reign of
terror and l' rise in Napoleon Bonaparte finished French monarchy. This n'
is not true. The father of Louis Philippe j' stays Louis Philippe II, the
duke d' Orleans, which supported the French revolution and s' Philippe
Égalité is called, but nevertheless guillotined over November 6, 1793 during
the reign of
terror. Realizing that its life was in danger, Louis Philippe left France in
April 1793 with l' age 19. It spent the 21 years to come on the race. Louis
Philippe was forced to live in the shades. It d' access moved in Switzerland
under an assumed name. Its identity was discovered Zurich inside, where the
Swiss authorities issued that to protect Switzerland neutrality, Louis
Philippe should leave the city. It went in Zug, where Louis Philippe was
discovered by a d' group; emigrants. It sold all except one of its horses.
Now moving city at the city in l' together from Switzerland, it had entered
refused to a monastery by the monks who l' thought of being young vagrants.
Another hour, it s' after busy one night in a barn is awaked to be with l'
remote end d' a mousquet, confronted with a man trying to keep the left
robbers. Throughout this period, it n' ever remained in a place more than 48
hours. In conclusion, in October 1793, Louis Philippe was named as has
French professor to a boys' ; boarding school in Italy. Its wages were of
1.400 francs and he taught under the name of Mr Chabos. the director of l'
school must have thought qu' he spoke rather well French for a vagrant
without hearth. He had been with l' school for one month when he heard the
news of Paris: his/her father guillotined on November 6, 1793 after has test
before the revolutionary tribunal. At the beginning of 1794, Louis Philippe
has a business with a girl of servant called Marianne Banzori, a cook with
l' school. When one l' that Marianne discovered was pregnant, Louis that
Philippe lost his work as a French professor. Marianne was send to Milan,
Italy where l' child had been born December 1794 and had placed in an
orphanage. After this, Louis Philippe went to Scandinavia in 1795 and then
in Finland, where it struck to the top the other broad ones. In a remote
village, alive under the name of Müller, it met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, which
was a housekeeper. It became pregnant too and gave rise to a son, which it
named Erik. Louis Philippe visited the United States during four years,
remaining Philadelphia inside (where his/her brothers Antoine and Louis
Charles were exile inside), New York City (where it most probably remained
with the field of family of Somerindyck on Broadway and with the
sixty-fifteenth street with d' other exiled princes), and in Boston. In
Boston, he taught French during a certain time and lived inside residences
above what is now the Room d' oyster of the trade unions, Boston' ; the
oldest restaurant of S. There is now a restaurant called “Louie' lost; S” in
its memory. During his time in the United States, Louis Philippe
met the American politicians, including George Clinton, John Jay, Alexandre
Hamilton, and George Washington. He was last king really to order France. He
was on October 6, 1773 born and dead on August 26, 1850. His/her father died
on the guillotine, but him s' was escaped in Italy. He passed more than
twenty years on the race, alive under assumed names, travelling as a vagrant
without hearth and to generate at least two children on the way. He even
reached l' America, all moment when a crowd l' sought behind in France,
trying to cross in addition to its head too. One of his/her illegitimate
children was by an Italian cook called Marianne Banzori and had been born in
Milan, Italy in 1794, had given to an orphanage for l' adoption and is
supposed lost. Another was Erik Wolhbom, which had been born in 1796 in
Muonio, Lappi, Suomi, Finland and is now the patriarch of the family of
Kolstrøm of Sweden. Louis Philippe j' regained the power on August 9, 1830,
when the L' French; National Assembly l' Louis-Philippe I declared, king of
the French. It ordered of 1830 jusqu' at February 24, 1848, when he
abdicated in favour of his son, Louis Philippe D' ; Orleans, l' author of
the book “history of the civil war in America”. On February 24, 1848, King
Louis Philippe ' abdicated in favour of his/her nine years old son, Louis
Philippe, Count De Paris, author of this book. He lived outside the two last
years of his life in England before death in 1850. The oldest son of Louis
Philippe j' stays Ferdinand Philippe d' ; Orleans, which was on September 3,
1810 born but died on July 13, 1842 in an accident of carriage and not ever
thus obtained d' to order. His/her son, Philippe d' ; Orleans, account of
Paris (on August 24, 1838-September 8, 1894) was the next king but wisely
thought to keep its head and n' the crown did not claim. Instead of that, it
went to America where it joined l' armed with the trade unions and fought in
the American civil war on the side of Yankee, where he wrote with the book
“the battle of Gettysburg of l' history of the civil war inside L' America”,
also published by Ishi Close, ISBN 4871873145. Thus, Louis Philippe had two
children whom we know approximately during the 21 years when he wandered d'
a place with l' other, hiding of insane crowd behind in Paris which wanted
to cross to far its head. Even his/her children of baby had to be secret
kept, because crowd would have killed them also they knew about them. Thus,
a child who could have been the legitimate king of France was given far for
l' adoption like safeguard. France, naturally, always has a king. Note
“naturally”. The king running of France east “Henry, Count De Paris”. Note
qu' it always employs the same title. It had been born on June 14, 1933 in
Woluwe-Saint-Pierre, Belgium. However, there are at least two other
applicants to be the true king of France, namely the descendants of Marianne
Banzori, good the d' back-kitchen qu' it struck to the top in Milan, and
Erik Wolhbom, the son of Beata Caisa Wahlbom. The descendants d' Erik
Wolhbom in Finland have a Web site in which they assert the right d' to
order France. It can find in a research of the family of Kolstrøm of Sweden.
There are some problems with this. Two are qu' one does not allow women d'
to order in France. Even the girls of Grace princess will not be let take
the power. This contrast with l' England, where the largest governors were
the women, the Elizabeth Queen


Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu
by
André Castelot
Introduction by Sam Sloan
The title of this book translates into English as “Louis-Philippe: The
Ignored”.

This is a suitable and appropriate title, because King Louis-Philippe
I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830 to 1848, has indeed
been ignored by history. Hardly anybody seems even to know that there
was such a king.

Even the biographies of him have been ignored. This book is not even
listed among the works of the famous biographer André Castelot. More
startling, Alexandre Dumas, one of the most famous authors of all
time, who wrote “The Three Muskateers”, “The Count of Monte Cristo”,
and “The Man in the Iron Mask”, also wrote a two-volume biography of
Louis-Philippe entitled “The Last King or the New France” and yet that
book is virtually unknown and unavailable. Ishi Press plans to print
it now.

Why would Ishi Press reprint three books about a man nobody ever heard
of?

The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power at the “King of the
French”.

That part of his life, which lasted 21 years but is hardly mentioned
by biographers André Castelot and Alexander Dumas, reminds me of the
song “Everglades”, made famous by the Kingston Trio, with the words
about how the events of history:

Sent him on the run through the Everglades
Runnin' like the dog through the Everglades
But he better keep movin' and don't stand still
If the skeeters don't get him then the gators will

Everybody has heard of King Louis XIV (1638-1715), King Louis XV
(1710-1774), famous for saying, “After Me, The Deluge”, and King Louis
XVI (1754 – 21 January 1793), who lost his head in the Deluge, as did
his wife, Marie Antoinette, who had her head chopped off on 16 October
1793.

To give an example of the broad reach of the Reign of Terror, the
great scientist, Antoine Lavoisier, who discovered oxygen and hydrogen
and devised the metric system that we use today, had his head chopped
off by the Guillotine on May 8, 1794. The judge who sentenced
Lavoisier to death is reported to have said, “The Revolution has no
need for geniuses.”

Except for those who have studied French history in detail, most
assume that these events plus the Reign of Terror and the rise of
Napoleon Bonaparte ended the French monarchy.

That is not true. The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe
II, Duke of Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called
himself Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6
November 1793 during the Reign of Terror.
Realizing that his life was in danger, Louis Philippe left France in
April, 1793 at age 19. He spent the next 21 years on the run. Louis
Philippe was forced to live in the shadows. He first moved to
Switzerland under an assumed name. His identity was discovered in
Zürich, where the Swiss authorities decreed that to protect Swiss
neutrality, Louis Philippe would have to leave the city. He went to
Zug, where Louis Philippe was discovered by a group of émigrés.

He sold all but one of his horses. Now moving from town to town
throughout Switzerland, he was refused entry to a monastery by monks
who believed him to be a young vagabonds. Another time, he woke up
after spending a night in a barn to find himself at the far end of a
musket, confronted by a man attempting to keep away thieves.
Throughout this period, he never stayed in one place more than 48
hours. Finally, in October 1793, Louis Philippe was appointed as a
teacher of French at a boys' boarding school in Italy. His salary was
1,400 francs and he taught under the name Monsieur Chabos. The
principal of the school must have thought that he spoke French rather
well for a homeless wanderer.
He had been at the school for a month when he heard the news from
Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6 November 1793 after a
trial before the revolutionary Tribunal.
In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl named
Marianne Banzori, a cook at the school. When it was discovered that
Marianne was pregnant, Louis Philippe lost his job as a teacher of
French. Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the child was born in
December 1794 and placed in an orphanage.
After that, Louis Philippe went to Scandinavia in 1795 and then to
Finland, where he knocked up another broad. In a remote village,
living under the name Müller, he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a
housekeeper. She got pregnant too and gave birth to a son, whom she
named Erik.
Louis Philippe visited the United States for four years, staying in
Philadelphia (where his brothers Antoine and Louis Charles were in
exile), New York City (where he most likely stayed at the Somerindyck
family estate on Broadway and 75th Street with other exiled princes),
and in Boston. In Boston, he taught French for a time and lived in
lodgings over what is now the Union Oyster House, Boston's oldest
restaurant. There is now a restaurant named “Lost Louie's” in his
memory.
During his time in the United States, Louis Philippe met with American
politicians, including George Clinton, John Jay, Alexander Hamilton,
and George Washington.
He was last king actually to rule France. He was born October 6, 1773
and died August 26, 1850. His father died on the guillotine, but he
had escaped to Italy. He spent more than twenty years on the run,
living under assumed names, traveling as a homeless vagabond and
fathering at least two children on the way. He even reached America,
all the while a mob searched for him back in France, trying to chop
off his head too.
One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named Marianne
Banzori and was born in Milan, Italy in 1794, given to an orphanage
for adoption and is presumed lost. Another was Erik Wolhbom, who was
born in 1796 in Muonio, Lappi, Suomi, Finland and is now the patriarch
of the Kolstrøm Family of Sweden.
Louis Phillipe I regained power on August 9, 1830, when the French
National Assembly declared him Louis-Philippe I, King of the French.
He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in favor
of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the book
“History of the Civil War in America”. On 24 February 1848, King Louis
Philippe I abdicated in favor of his nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book. He lived out the last
two years of his life in England before dying in 1850.
The eldest son of Louis Phillipe I was Ferdinand Philippe d'Orléans,
who was born 3 September 1810 but died on 13 July 1842 in a carriage
accident and thus never got to rule. His son, Philippe d'Orléans,
Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September 1894) was the next king
but wisely thought to keep his head and did not claim the crown.
Instead, he went to America where he joined the Union Army and fought
in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where he wrote the book
“The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the Civil War in
America”, also published by Ishi Press, ISBN 4871873145 .
Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about during the 21
years when he wandered from place to place, hiding from the mad throng
back in Paris that wanted to chop off his head. Even his baby children
had to be kept secret, as the throng would have killed them too had
they known about them. Thus, a child who might have been the rightful
King of France was given away for adoption as a safeguard.
France, of course, still has a king. Note the “of course”. The Current
King of France is “Henry, Comte de Paris”. Notice that he still uses
the same title. He was born on June 14, 1933 in Woluwe-Saint-Pierre,
Belgium.
However, there are at least two other claimants to be the Real King of
France, namely the descendants of Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid
he knocked up in Milan, and Erik Wolhbom, the son of Beata Caisa
Wahlbom.
The descendants of Erik Wolhbom in Finland have a website in which
they claim the Right to Rule France. It can be found in a search for
the Kolstrøm Family of Sweden.
There are a few problems with this. Two are that women are not allowed
to rule in France. Even the daughters of Princess Grace will not be
allowed to take power. This is in contrast to England, where the
greatest rulers have been women, Queen Elizabeth I (1533 – 1603) and
Queen Victoria (1819 – 1901).
Secondly, illegitimate children are not recognized as royalty by the
French, unlike the Scottish who recognize the ******* children of
their kings as Royal. (One branch of my own family claims descent from
an illegitimate child of a King of Scotland.)
The French kings especially had many illegitimate children and had
they been recognized as royalty that would have changed history.
André Castelot was a French writer, born in Belgium, who wrote 65
biographies of famous persons in the History of France. He is perhaps
best known for his biographies of Napoleon, of Josephine, and of
Marie Antoinette, Queen of France.
About Josephine, the Fort Wayne News Sentinel wrote: “From some of her
love letters newly found and or not published before, from intensive
reading of state documents and records and from thorough research in
the archives of many nations, Castelot reveals a brilliant study of
the passionate and elusive Empress. It is a rewarding trip through the
French Revolution and terror, a resume of the Directorate and a
revelation of the reign of the First Napoleon.”

Castelot's biography of Napoleon shows how his tumultuous relationship
with Josephine influenced and affected his Napoleonic Code. It was
because of Josephine's fickleness and unfaithfulness to Napoleon that
Napoleon decreed that all women upon leaving their father's houses and
entering into matrimony must understand that henceforth they are to be
under the control of their husbands. Women cannot be trusted to be
free, said Napoleon.

André Castelot was born André Storms on 23 January 1911 in Antwerp,
Belgium. He died on 18 July 2004 in Neuilly-sur-Seine, Paris, France.
He was a French writer and historian. He was the son of the Symbolist
painter Maurice Chabas and Gabrielle Storms-Castelot. It is possible
that his parents never married, as he took his mother's name of
Castelot. Perhaps this helps explain why his works emphasize illicit
and illegitimate relationships. It also makes for good literature.

Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
USA
November 7, 2011


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Old November 8th 11, 05:54 PM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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Posts: 1,329
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot


The condensed version:

Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot
Introduction by Sam Sloan

King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830 to
1848, has indeed been runnin' like a dog through the Everglades.
Everybody has heard of King Louis XIV (1638-1715) who discovered
oxygen and hydrogen and devised the Guillotine.

That is not true.

Realizing that his life was in danger, Louis sold all but one of his
horses. Now throughout Switzerland, he woke up at a boys' boarding
school in Italy. The school must have been at the school for a month
when Paris had been guillotined.

In early 1794, Philippe was placed in an orphanage. After that, he
knocked up another broad named Erik. Antoine and Louis Charles taught
French for a time in Boston's oldest restaurant.

George Washington was the last king actually to rule France. He was
born and died on the guillotine, but escaped to Italy. He spent more
than twenty years trying to chop off his head.

One Italian cook is presumed lost. Finland is now the patriarch of
Sweden. He ruled until 1848, when he abdicated in favor of the Civil
War, author of that book. He lived out the last of his life before
dying.

Ferdinand was born in a carriage accident and thus never joined the
Union Army during the 21 years he wandered from place to place to chop
off his head. Even his baby children have a website. There are a few
problems with this.

This is in contrast to England, where the greatest rulers have been
illegitimate children. One branch of my own family had many
illegitimate children and would have changed history. André Castelot
was a French writer who wrote the Fort Wayne News Sentinel. It is a
trip.

Napoleon decreed that all women must understand the Symbolist painter
Maurice Chabas. It makes for good literature.

Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
USA
November 7, 2011



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Old November 8th 11, 05:59 PM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2011
Posts: 1,329
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot


A condensed version:

Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot
Introduction by Sam Sloan

King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830 to
1848, has indeed been runnin' like a dog through the Everglades.
Everybody has heard of King Louis XIV (1638-1715) who discovered
oxygen and hydrogen and devised the Guillotine.

That is not true.

Realizing that his life was in danger, Louis sold all but one of his
horses. Now throughout Switzerland, he woke up at a boys' boarding
school in Italy. The school must have been at the school for a month
when Paris had been guillotined.

In early 1794, Philippe was placed in an orphanage. After that, he
knocked up another broad named Erik. Antoine and Louis Charles taught
French for a time in Boston's oldest restaurant.

George Washington was the last king actually to rule France. He was
born and died on the guillotine, but escaped to Italy. He spent more
than twenty years trying to chop off his head.

One Italian cook is presumed lost. Finland is now the patriarch of
Sweden. He ruled until 1848, when he abdicated in favor of the Civil
War, author of that book. He lived out the last of his life before
dying.

Ferdinand was born in a carriage accident and thus never joined the
Union Army during the 21 years he wandered from place to place to chop
off his head. Even his baby children have a website. There are a few
problems with this.

This is in contrast to England, where the greatest rulers have been
illegitimate children. One branch of my own family had many
illegitimate children and would have changed history. André Castelot
was a French writer who wrote the Fort Wayne News Sentinel. It is a
trip.

Napoleon decreed that all women must understand the Symbolist painter
Maurice Chabas. It makes for good literature.

Sam Sloan
San Rafael California
USA
November 7, 2011


  #5   Report Post  
Old November 8th 11, 07:00 PM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2011
Posts: 1,329
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

On Nov 7, 11:37*pm, Jürgen R. wrote:
ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL

Sloan, this is great. It is the greatest introduction
to a book ever written. I admit that I have never
had the patience to read one of Sloan's introductions from
beginning to end, but even the first two paragraphs
suffice to establish that he is a humorist who could
easily have held his own in a tangle in
the alligator-infested swamps of the Mississippi
with Mark Twain.


I must agree with Jürgen. This is the best — i.e. actually the worst
— intro by Sloan that I have seen. Besides the usual glut of factual
errors, it is ridiculously rendundant to a ridiculous extent. Examples
of various things stated several times to no purpose:

King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830
to 1848,
He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in
favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the
book “History of the Civil War in America”.
On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe I abdicated in favor of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book.
Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September
1894) was the next king … he went to America where he joined the Union
Army and fought in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where
he wrote the book “The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the
Civil War in America”,

The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power
That part of his life, which lasted 21 years
He spent the next 21 years on the run.
during the 21 years when he wandered from place to place,

The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe II, Duke of
Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called himself
Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6 November 1793
he heard the news from Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6
November 1793
His father died on the guillotine,

In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl
named Marianne Banzori … Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the
child was born in December 1794
One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named
Marianne Banzori
he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a housekeeper. She got pregnant
too and gave birth to a son, whom she named Erik.
Another was Erik Wolhbom,
Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid he knocked up in Milan, and Erik
Wolhbom, the son of Beata Caisa Wahlbom.
Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about


  #6   Report Post  
Old November 8th 11, 09:10 PM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

Thank you all.

Don't forget to buy and read the book when it comes out in two days.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873552
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873552

You will have to read it in French, though.

Never fear, after two more days I will have translated it into
English. (I am quick at that and I do not even use Babelfish.)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873560
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873560

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873579
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873579

Sam Sloan

Go see the new video: "Hitler complains that there are spelling

On Nov 8, 11:00*am, Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Nov 7, 11:37*pm, Jürgen R. wrote:

ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL


Sloan, this is great. It is the greatest introduction
to a book ever written. I admit that I have never
had the patience to read one of Sloan's introductions from
beginning to end, but even the first two paragraphs
suffice to establish that he is a humorist who could
easily have held his own in a tangle in
the alligator-infested swamps of the Mississippi
with Mark Twain.


* I must agree with Jürgen. This is the best — i.e. actually the worst
— intro by Sloan that I have seen. Besides the usual glut of factual
errors, it is ridiculously rendundant to a ridiculous extent. Examples
of various things stated several times to no purpose:

* King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830
to 1848,
* He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in
favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the
book “History of the Civil War in America”.
* On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe I abdicated in favor of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book.
* Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September
1894) was the next king … he went to America where he joined the Union
Army and fought *in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where
he wrote the book “The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the
Civil War in America”,

* The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power
* That part of his life, which lasted 21 years
* He spent the next 21 years on the run.
* during the 21 years when he wandered from place to place,

* The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe II, Duke of
Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called himself
Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6 November 1793
* he heard the news from Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6
November 1793
* His father died on the guillotine,

* In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl
named Marianne Banzori … Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the
child was born in December 1794
* One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named
Marianne Banzori
* he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a housekeeper. She got pregnant
too and gave birth to a son, whom she named Erik.
* Another was Erik Walhbom,
* Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid he knocked up in Milan, and Erik
Walhbom, the son of Beata Caisa Wahlbom.
* Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about


I need to add that after knocking up two broads Louis Philippe got
legally married to Maria Amalia of Naples and Sicily in 1809. Always
an active man, they had ten children together, who are the ancestors
to most of the Royal Families of Europe today.

Of course, all that will be overthrown if we can ever find the child
of Marianne Banzori who was given away for adoption and who, if found
through DNA testing, would be the rightful King of France and
everywhere else in Europe today.

Sam Sloan
  #7   Report Post  
Old November 9th 11, 12:59 AM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

On Nov 8, 1:10*pm, samsloan wrote:
Thank you all.

Don't forget to buy and read the book when it comes out in two days.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873552h...SBN=4871873552

You will have to read it in French, though.

Never fear, after two more days I will have translated it into
English. (I am quick at that and I do not even use Babelfish.)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873560h...SBN=4871873560

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873579h...SBN=4871873579

Sam Sloan

Go see the new video: "Hitler complains that there are spelling

On Nov 8, 11:00*am, Taylor Kingston wrote:









On Nov 7, 11:37*pm, Jürgen R. wrote:


ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL


Sloan, this is great. It is the greatest introduction
to a book ever written. I admit that I have never
had the patience to read one of Sloan's introductions from
beginning to end, but even the first two paragraphs
suffice to establish that he is a humorist who could
easily have held his own in a tangle in
the alligator-infested swamps of the Mississippi
with Mark Twain.


* I must agree with Jürgen. This is the best — i.e. actually the worst
— intro by Sloan that I have seen. Besides the usual glut of factual
errors, it is ridiculously rendundant to a ridiculous extent. Examples
of various things stated several times to no purpose:


* King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830
to 1848,
* He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in
favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the
book “History of the Civil War in America”.
* On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe I abdicated in favor of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book.
* Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September
1894) was the next king … he went to America where he joined the Union
Army and fought *in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where
he wrote the book “The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the
Civil War in America”,


* The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power
* That part of his life, which lasted 21 years
* He spent the next 21 years on the run.
* during the 21 years when he wandered from place to place,


* The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe II, Duke of
Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called himself
Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6 November 1793
* he heard the news from Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6
November 1793
* His father died on the guillotine,


* In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl
named Marianne Banzori … Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the
child was born in December 1794
* One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named
Marianne Banzori
* he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a housekeeper. She got pregnant
too and gave birth to a son, whom she named Erik.
* Another was Erik Walhbom,
* Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid he knocked up in Milan, and Erik
Walhbom, the son of Beata Caisa Wahlbom.
* Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about


I need to add that after knocking up two broads Louis Philippe got
legally married to Maria Amalia of Naples and Sicily in 1809. Always
an active man, they had ten children together, who are the ancestors
to most of the Royal Families of Europe today.

Of course, all that will be overthrown if we can ever find the child
of *Marianne Banzori who was given away for adoption and who, if found
through DNA testing, would be the rightful King of France and
everywhere else in Europe today.

Sam Sloan

Why does Stan Booz a/k/a None keep doing this? Does not he know that
this just gives me an excuse to post again?

http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873552

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873552

Sam Sloan
  #8   Report Post  
Old November 9th 11, 01:40 AM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2011
Posts: 1,329
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

On Nov 8, 4:59*pm, samsloan wrote:

Thank you all.


Don't forget to buy and read the book when it comes out in two days.



Why would Ishi Press reprint three books about nobody?

The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the metric
system. The judge who sentenced Lavoisier was forced to live in the
shadows. He was discovered by a group of émigrés. He was refused entry
to a monastery by young vagabonds. Another time, he woke up at the far
end of a boys' boarding school.

After that, a remote village visited the United States for four
years, staying with other exiled princes. Alexander Hamilton died on
the guillotine, but he spent more than twenty years on the run, living
under at least two children. He even reached an Italian cook named
Marianne and is now the patriarch of England.

The eldest son wisely wanted to chop off his head. Thus, a child who
might have been the rightful scullery maid can be found in a branch of
my own family. Napoleon of the Fort Wayne News Sentinel wrote love
letters because of fickleness.

Women cannot be trusted in Antwerp.
  #9   Report Post  
Old November 9th 11, 03:41 AM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2010
Posts: 134
Default Serial Copyright Violations, by Sam Sloan

On Nov 8, 7:59*pm, samsloan wrote:

Does not he know that
this just gives me an excuse to post again?


Yeah like you need an excuse. You'd post youir bowel movements if your
could render them in uuencode.
  #10   Report Post  
Old November 11th 11, 01:01 PM posted to soc.culture.french,soc.culture.italian,soc.culture.usa,rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by ChessBanter: May 2006
Posts: 14,870
Default Louis-Philippe: Le méconnu by André Castelot

On Nov 8, 4:59*pm, samsloan wrote:
On Nov 8, 1:10*pm, samsloan wrote:







Thank you all.


Don't forget to buy and read the book when it comes out in two days.


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873552h...andnoble.com/b...


You will have to read it in French, though.


Never fear, after two more days I will have translated it into
English. (I am quick at that and I do not even use Babelfish.)


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873560h...andnoble.com/b...


http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873579h...andnoble.com/b...


Sam Sloan


Go see the new video: "Hitler complains that there are spelling


On Nov 8, 11:00*am, Taylor Kingston wrote:


On Nov 7, 11:37*pm, Jürgen R. wrote:


ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL ROFL


Sloan, this is great. It is the greatest introduction
to a book ever written. I admit that I have never
had the patience to read one of Sloan's introductions from
beginning to end, but even the first two paragraphs
suffice to establish that he is a humorist who could
easily have held his own in a tangle in
the alligator-infested swamps of the Mississippi
with Mark Twain.


* I must agree with Jürgen. This is the best — i.e. actually the worst
— intro by Sloan that I have seen. Besides the usual glut of factual
errors, it is ridiculously rendundant to a ridiculous extent. Examples
of various things stated several times to no purpose:


* King Louis-Philippe I, King of the French, who ruled from from 1830
to 1848,
* He ruled from 1830 until February 24, 1848, when he abdicated in
favor of his grandson, Louis Philippe D'Orleans, the author of the
book “History of the Civil War in America”.
* On 24 February 1848, King Louis Philippe I abdicated in favor of his
nine-year-old grandson, Louis
Philippe, Comte de Paris, author of that book.
* Philippe d'Orléans, Count of Paris (24 August 1838 – 8 September
1894) was the next king … he went to America where he joined the Union
Army and fought *in the American Civil War on the Yankee side, where
he wrote the book “The Battle of Gettysburg from the History of the
Civil War in America”,


* The answer lies in the special fascination I have with the 21 years
Louis Philippe spent before he gained power
* That part of his life, which lasted 21 years
* He spent the next 21 years on the run.
* during the 21 years when he wandered from place to place,


* The father of Louis Philippe I was Louis Philippe II, Duke of
Orléans, who supported the French Revolution and called himself
Philippe Égalité, but nonetheless was guillotined on 6 November 1793
* he heard the news from Paris: his father had been guillotined on 6
November 1793
* His father died on the guillotine,


* In early 1794, Louis Philippe has an affair with a servant girl
named Marianne Banzori … Marianne was send to Milan, Italy where the
child was born in December 1794
* One of his illegitimate children was by an Italian cook named
Marianne Banzori
* he met Beata Caisa Wahlbom, who was a housekeeper. She got pregnant
too and gave birth to a son, whom she named Erik.
* Another was Erik Walhbom,
* Marianne Banzori, the scullery maid he knocked up in Milan, and Erik
Walhbom, the son of Beata Caisa Wahlbom.
* Thus, Louis Philippe had two children that we know about


I need to add that after knocking up two broads Louis Philippe got
legally married to Maria Amalia of Naples and Sicily in 1809. Always
an active man, they had ten children together, who are the ancestors
to most of the Royal Families of Europe today.


Of course, all that will be overthrown if we can ever find the child
of *Marianne Banzori who was given away for adoption and who, if found
through DNA testing, would be the rightful King of France and
everywhere else in Europe today.


Sam Sloan


Why does Stan Booz a/k/a None keep doing this? Does not he know that
this just gives me an excuse to post again?

*http://www.amazon.com/dp/4871873552

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...SBN=4871873552

Sam Sloan


I am not violating anybody's copyright. Every book I reprint I have
the permission of the author or, if the author is no longer alive from
his wife or children, if living.

Sam Sloan
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