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Old December 12th 11, 05:52 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

Sam Sloan has won the Silver Medal (Second Prize) in the World Memory
Championships.

http://www.worldmemorychampionships....al_Results.pdf

The World Memory Championships were contested in Guangzhou China on
December 7-10, 2011. There are nine categories of memory, including
the ability to remember random numbers, random words, binary digits,
abstract images, names and faces, dates of events and decks of cards.

Winner was a 73-year-old grandmother, Kuang Liqun, who goes by the
name of "Lily". Two of her grandsons won the grandmaster title and one
of them won the World Junior Memory Championship.

There was wide variation among the abilities of the contestants to
perform various memory tasks. For example, 16-year-old Sri Vyshnavi
Yarlagadda of Hydrabad India won the "Names and Faces" contest by a
wide margin by being able to remember 92 names and faces in five
minutes, but she finished near the bottom in the test of speed cards
by being able to remember only five playing cards in five minutes.
Apparently she has not spent much time playing cards.

Girls tended to do better in Names and Faces and dates and historic
events whereas men did better in remembering random numbers.

To win the grandmaster title one needs to be able to memorize a
complete deck of cards in less than 60 seconds and to memorize 200
random numbers in 15 minutes, among other tasks.

The event was organized by Chess Grandmaster Raymond Keene and Tony
Buzon. Jennifer Goddard did all the work especially in calculating the
prize winners.
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Old December 12th 11, 10:06 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

Well done, Sam!
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Old December 12th 11, 01:18 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

Sam is in his mid-sixties. This is impressive.
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Old December 12th 11, 01:35 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

On Dec 12, 12:52*am, samsloan wrote:
Sam Sloan has won the Silver Medal (Second Prize) in the World Memory
Championships.

http://www.worldmemorychampionships..../content/2011_...

The World Memory Championships were contested in Guangzhou China on
December 7-10, 2011. There are nine categories of memory, including
the ability to remember random numbers, random words, binary digits,
abstract images, names and faces, dates of events and decks of cards.

Winner was a 73-year-old grandmother, Kuang Liqun, who goes by the
name of "Lily". Two of her grandsons won the grandmaster title and one
of them won the World Junior Memory Championship.

There was wide variation among the abilities of the contestants to
perform various memory tasks. For example, 16-year-old Sri Vyshnavi
Yarlagadda of Hydrabad India won the "Names and Faces" contest by a
wide margin by being able to remember 92 names and faces in five
minutes, but she finished near the bottom in the test of speed cards
by being able to remember only five playing cards in five minutes.
Apparently she has not spent much time playing cards.

Girls tended to do better in Names and Faces and dates and historic
events whereas men did better in remembering random numbers.

To win the grandmaster title one needs to be able to memorize a
complete deck of cards in less than 60 seconds and to memorize 200
random numbers in 15 minutes, among other tasks.

The event was organized by Chess Grandmaster Raymond Keene and Tony
Buzon. Jennifer Goddard did all the work especially in calculating the
prize winners.


As usual Sam is being modest.

First, he neglected to mention that his cumulative score was the
lowest in the entire competition. Sam scored 306 points to the
winner's 20 thousand. The second lowest score was Simone Rosati of
Italy, who scored 700 points, double the Sloon's. There were many
unqualified entrants, so to have the worst score is quite an
accomplishment.

Second, Sloan neglected to mention that he competed in the prestigious
"Senior" Division. As everyone knows old people have really good
memories, so the competition there must have been as stiff as an 80
year olds erection.

Third, as far as I can tell from the score sheet, there were only two
competitors in the senior division, which is the division Sam managed
his second.

Finally, Sloan neglected to post his scores. Here they are. He managed
to come within one or two spots of dead last in 6 out of 7 areas, with
a top finish of 101st out of 112.

Names: 108th / 111
Hours: 109th /109
Images 109th /110th
Dates 109th/ 111
Words 104th / 104
Numbers 106th / 110
Speed Cards 101st / 112

It seems the world memory championships are like one of those tether
ball games they play at the special Olympics where everyone wins and
gets a prize. The difference between Sloan and a retard is that the
retard has too much self respect to boast his accomplishment.

Congratulations Sam!



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Old December 12th 11, 05:06 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

On Dec 11, 9:52*pm, samsloan wrote:

Sam Sloan has won the Silver Medal (Second Prize) in the World Memory
Championships.


Heck, we here at rgc have known for years how good Sam's memory is,
especially when it comes to remembering things that never happened.


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Old December 12th 11, 05:40 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship



"Taylor Kingston" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
On Dec 11, 9:52 pm, samsloan wrote:

Sam Sloan has won the Silver Medal (Second Prize) in the World Memory
Championships.


Heck, we here at rgc have known for years how good Sam's memory is,
especially when it comes to remembering things that never happened.


But you didn't know that in China you get the Silver Medal for being
last. Moreover, the Chinese are much too polite to tell you what the
inscription on the medal means.

So now Dung Bi Tel is self-anointed World Champion of Chinese Chess

AND

Self-Proclaimed Champion of World Memory.

No more mountains to climb for our Hero!

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Old December 12th 11, 06:31 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

On Dec 12, 2:06*am, Offramp wrote:
Well done, Sam!


http://www.chessgames.com/player/sam_sloan.html
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Old December 12th 11, 09:14 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

On Dec 12, 9:40*am, Jürgen R. wrote:
"Taylor Kingston" schrieb im ...

On Dec 11, 9:52 pm, samsloan wrote:


Sam Sloan has won the Silver Medal (Second Prize) in the World Memory
Championships.


*Heck, we here at rgc have known for years how good Sam's memory is,
especially when it comes to remembering things that never happened.


But you didn't know that in China you get the Silver Medal for being
last.


Ah, so this is like the way Pravda reported a foot-race between
Soviet Premier Nikita Krushchev and US President John F. Kennedy.
Krushchev was said to finish second, while JFK came next to last.

Moreover, the Chinese are much too polite to tell you what the
inscription on the medal means.

So now Dung Bi Tel is self-anointed World Champion of Chinese Chess

AND

Self-Proclaimed Champion of World Memory.

No more mountains to climb for our Hero!


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Old December 13th 11, 03:32 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

To those of you who doubt that I really did win the Silver medal at
the World Memory Championships, here is a picture of me receiving the
medal and holding the giant trophy they gave me.

(The trophy I got was bigger than the trophy they gave the person who
won the event.)

Regarding my low scores in some of the events, let me explain that
these contestants had trained for months or even years to perform
certain memory tasks. For example, I asked Sri Vyshnavi Yarlagadda of
Hydrabad India, the 16-year-old girl who won the names and faces
memory contest, what does she do, what are her hobbies and what does
she study, and she replied she does names and faces, she studies names
and faces and her hobbies are names and faces.

She said that she used to be a chess player but she only got to 1600
so she gave that up and took up names and faces instead.

She got 92 names and faces right in 15 minutes and that was more than
30% more than the second place finisher. Second place in Names and
Faces was James Ponder from England. He only got 66 right. I spoke to
him as he was departing for the airport and he was very disappointed
in his poor performance. He had come all the way from the UK just for
this event.

I suspect that Sri Vyshnavi Yarlagadda got her start on names and
faces so that she could learn to remember her own name.

Here is her picture, wearing her medal.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/4318128...57628355388991

Do not worry. She brought her mother with her from India for her
protection. I doubt she is even 16 as she is not fully grown yet.

By contrast, I was a walk-in. I attended this event essentially by
accident, as I did not know about it and was on my way to Beijing for
the Sports Accord event. I did not know the rules and messed up
several of the events as a result. I tested several of the
grandmasters on simple memory tests and found that my natural memory
ability was just as good and probably better than theirs. This is a
positive point for the event as it proves that even a person with
average memory ability can, with training, perform fantastic feats of
memory, such as remembering one thousand random numbers in 15 minutes.
Actually, the World Champion on this test was given 3000 numbers to
memorize in one hour figuring that this was the maximum but two people
memorized all 3000 numbers without a mistake, so there was a tie so
they had to do it all again, this time with 4000 numbers.

The winner was world champion Liu Su who memorized 3390 numbers,
followed by Wang Feng with 3360 numbers. Third was Yu Binjing, a
female law student with 2278 numbers. Here is a picture of me
congratulating Yu Binjing on her third place result. (It is a good
picture.) http://www.flickr.com/photos/4318128...57628355388991

Sam Sloan
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Old December 13th 11, 03:51 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,soc.culture.china,soc.culture.indian,soc.culture.usa
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Posts: 14,870
Default Sam Sloan wins Silver Medal in World Memory Championship

Sorry, I forgot to include the picture of me being awarded the silver
medal.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/4318128...in/photostream

On Dec 12, 7:32*pm, samsloan wrote:
To those of you who doubt that I really did win the Silver medal at
the World Memory Championships, here is a picture of me receiving the
medal and holding the giant trophy they gave me.

(The trophy I got was bigger than the trophy they gave the person who
won the event.)

Regarding my low scores in some of the events, let me explain that
these contestants had trained for months or even years to perform
certain memory tasks. For example, I asked Sri Vyshnavi Yarlagadda of
Hydrabad India, the 16-year-old girl who won the names and faces
memory contest, what does she do, what are her hobbies and what does
she study, and she replied she does names and faces, she studies names
and faces and her hobbies are names and faces.

She said that she used to be a chess player but she only got to 1600
so she gave that up and took up names and faces instead.

She got 92 names and faces right in 15 minutes and that was more than
30% more than the second place finisher. Second place in Names and
Faces was James Ponder from England. He only got 66 right. I spoke to
him as he was departing for the airport and he was very disappointed
in his poor performance. He had come all the way from the UK just for
this event.

I suspect that Sri Vyshnavi Yarlagadda got her start on names and
faces so that she could learn to remember her own name.

Here is her picture, wearing her medal.http://www.flickr.com/photos/4318128.../set-721576283...

Do not worry. She brought her mother with her from India for her
protection. I doubt she is even 16 as she is not fully grown yet.

By contrast, I was a walk-in. I attended this event essentially by
accident, as I did not know about it and was on my way to Beijing for
the Sports Accord event. I did not know the rules and messed up
several of the events as a result. I tested several of the
grandmasters on simple memory tests and found that my natural memory
ability was just as good and probably better than theirs. This is a
positive point for the event as it proves that even a person with
average memory ability can, with training, perform fantastic feats of
memory, such as remembering one thousand random numbers in 15 minutes.
Actually, the World Champion on this test was given 3000 numbers to
memorize in one hour figuring that this was the maximum but two people
memorized all 3000 numbers without a mistake, so there was a tie so
they had to do it all again, this time with 4000 numbers.

The winner was world champion Liu Su who memorized 3390 numbers,
followed by Wang Feng with 3360 numbers. Third was Yu Binjing, a
female law student with 2278 numbers. Here is a picture of me
congratulating Yu Binjing on her third place result. (It is a good
picture.)http://www.flickr.com/photos/4318128.../set-721576283...

Sam Sloan


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