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Old April 13th 12, 02:50 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

Greegor wrote:
On Apr 11, 6:01 am, samsloan wrote:
This reminds me of a subject about which I have been
thinking. Perhaps the most memorable words ever
uttered in the history of the movies was, "I'll
get you my pretty and your little dog too! "


There have been quite a few, "Memorable words" to come out of Hollywood".
How about, "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn." Or, "Badges? We don't got
to have any stinking badges...We're banditos!" Or, (my favorite) "It is not
the right, but the responsibiliity for good men to break bad laws." Or,
"Here's looking at you, sweetheart." Or, "Truth? You couldn't handle the
truth!"

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Old April 13th 12, 07:10 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

On Apr 12, 6:50*pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:
Greegor wrote:
On Apr 11, 6:01 am, samsloan wrote:
This reminds me of a subject about which I have been
thinking. Perhaps the most memorable words ever
uttered in the history of the movies was, "I'll
get you my pretty and your little dog too! "


There have been quite a few, "Memorable words" to come out of Hollywood".
How about ... "Badges? We don't got
to have any stinking badges...We're banditos!"


Close, but not quite right. Here's the clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaxURLFn6jU

*Or,
"Here's looking at you, sweetheart."


The last word is "kid," not "sweetheart."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bv8MGYnP820

My own favorites from Margaret Hamilton in "Wizard of Oz" are "These
things must be done delicately," and "Wanna play ball, Scarecrow?"

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Old April 13th 12, 11:55 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinking_badges

Stinking badges From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to:
navigation, search "Badges? We don't need no stinkin' badges!" is a
well-known and widely (mis)quoted line from cinematic history.[1] In
2005, it was chosen as #36 on the American Film Institute list, AFI's
100 Years...100 Movie Quotes.[2] It comes from a line of dialog from a
1927 novel, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, and first appeared in
film 21 years later in a movie of the same name; the line was parodied
in the Mel Brooks film Blazing Saddles in 1974 and was cited in many
movies after that.

Contents [hide]
1 History
1.1 First occurrences
1.2 Later citations
2 References

[edit] History[edit] First occurrencesThe original version of the line
appeared in B. Traven's 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Mad

"All right," Curtin shouted back. "If you are the police, where are
your badges? Let's see them."
"Badges, to god-damned hell with badges! We have no badges. In fact,
we don't need badges. I don't have to show you any stinking badges,
you god-damned cabrón and chinga tu madre! Come out from that ****-
hole of yours. I have to speak to you."
The line was popularized by the 1948 film adaptation of the novel.[3]
In one scene, a Mexican bandit leader named "Gold Hat"[4] (portrayed
by Alfonso Bedoya) tries to convince Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart)
[2] that he and his company are Federales:

Dobbs: "If you're the police where are your badges?"
Gold Hat: "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I
don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!"
[edit] Later citationsIn the TV show The Monkees episode 33 "A Nice
Place To Visit" (1967), Micky Dolenz copied the line as "Badges? We
don't need no stinking badges".

In Mel Brooks' 1974 Western Blazing Saddles, the line was delivered as
"Badges? We don't need no stinking badges". This condensed version has
become one of the most popular variations of the quotation.[citation
needed]

The 1985 film Gotcha! likewise features the line as comic dialogue
during a Mexican standoff between two CIA officers and a Mexican-
American college student (Nick Corri), who is immediately backed up by
a group of armed Mexican-American gang members.

In the 1985 Robert Altman movie O.C. and Stiggs, the line is said by a
Mexican souvenir salesman, upon the arrival of the titular characters
in Mexico, after improbably floating downstream from Phoenix, Arizona,
on car tires stolen from a rich and much hated local insurance
salesmen (Schwab), en route to seeing King Sunny Ade - a musician one
of the characters (Stiggs) holds in very high regard.

In the 1989 film Troop Beverly Hills, the character Rosa (played by
Shelley Morrison) states, "Patches? We don't need no stinkin'
patches!" when Velda (the villainous character played by Betty Thomas)
revokes their Girl Scout patches.

In the 1989 Weird Al Yankovic film UHF, the line occurs in a spoof of
Raul's Wild Kingdom, during the scene where Raul (Trinidad Silva)
receives his animal delivery. When he is asked to take a consignment
of badgers, he says "Badgers? We don't need no stinking badgers!".

[edit] References1.^ Hal Erickson (2010). "Alfonso Bedoya Movies".
Blockbuster. http://www.blockbuster.com/browse/ca...onDetails/4404.
Retrieved 2010-04-27.
2.^ a b "AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes". USA Today. 2010.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/...e-quotes_x.htm.
Retrieved 2010-04-27.
3.^ "Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The (1948)". www.classicfilmguide.com.
2010. http://www.classicfilmguide.com/indexa620.html. Retrieved
2010-04-21.
4.^ Hal Erickson (2010). "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)".
Blockbuster. http://www.blockbuster.com/browse/ca...eDetails/35991.
Retrieved 2010-04-21.

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Old April 14th 12, 05:45 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2011
Posts: 32
Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

Greegor wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stinking_badges

Stinking badges From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to:
navigation, search "Badges? We don't need no stinkin' badges!" is a
well-known and widely (mis)quoted line from cinematic history.[1] In
2005, it was chosen as #36 on the American Film Institute list, AFI's
100 Years...100 Movie Quotes.[2] It comes from a line of dialog from a
1927 novel, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, and first appeared in
film 21 years later in a movie of the same name; the line was parodied
in the Mel Brooks film Blazing Saddles in 1974 and was cited in many
movies after that.

Contents [hide]
1 History
1.1 First occurrences
1.2 Later citations
2 References

[edit] History[edit] First occurrencesThe original version of the line
appeared in B. Traven's 1927 novel The Treasure of the Sierra Mad

"All right," Curtin shouted back. "If you are the police, where are
your badges? Let's see them."
"Badges, to god-damned hell with badges! We have no badges. In fact,
we don't need badges. I don't have to show you any stinking badges,
you god-damned cabrón and chinga tu madre! Come out from that ****-
hole of yours. I have to speak to you."
The line was popularized by the 1948 film adaptation of the novel.[3]
In one scene, a Mexican bandit leader named "Gold Hat"[4] (portrayed
by Alfonso Bedoya) tries to convince Fred C. Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart)
[2] that he and his company are Federales:

Dobbs: "If you're the police where are your badges?"
Gold Hat: "Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I
don't have to show you any stinkin' badges!"
[edit] Later citationsIn the TV show The Monkees episode 33 "A Nice
Place To Visit" (1967), Micky Dolenz copied the line as "Badges? We
don't need no stinking badges".

In Mel Brooks' 1974 Western Blazing Saddles, the line was delivered as
"Badges? We don't need no stinking badges". This condensed version has
become one of the most popular variations of the quotation.[citation
needed]

The 1985 film Gotcha! likewise features the line as comic dialogue
during a Mexican standoff between two CIA officers and a Mexican-
American college student (Nick Corri), who is immediately backed up by
a group of armed Mexican-American gang members.

In the 1985 Robert Altman movie O.C. and Stiggs, the line is said by a
Mexican souvenir salesman, upon the arrival of the titular characters
in Mexico, after improbably floating downstream from Phoenix, Arizona,
on car tires stolen from a rich and much hated local insurance
salesmen (Schwab), en route to seeing King Sunny Ade - a musician one
of the characters (Stiggs) holds in very high regard.

In the 1989 film Troop Beverly Hills, the character Rosa (played by
Shelley Morrison) states, "Patches? We don't need no stinkin'
patches!" when Velda (the villainous character played by Betty Thomas)
revokes their Girl Scout patches.

In the 1989 Weird Al Yankovic film UHF, the line occurs in a spoof of
Raul's Wild Kingdom, during the scene where Raul (Trinidad Silva)
receives his animal delivery. When he is asked to take a consignment
of badgers, he says "Badgers? We don't need no stinking badgers!".

[edit] References1.^ Hal Erickson (2010). "Alfonso Bedoya Movies".
Blockbuster.
http://www.blockbuster.com/browse/ca...onDetails/4404.
Retrieved 2010-04-27.
2.^ a b "AFI's 100 Years...100 Movie Quotes". USA Today. 2010.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/...e-quotes_x.htm.
Retrieved 2010-04-27.
3.^ "Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The (1948)".
www.classicfilmguide.com. 2010.
http://www.classicfilmguide.com/indexa620.html. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
4.^ Hal Erickson (2010). "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948)".
Blockbuster.
http://www.blockbuster.com/browse/ca...eDetails/35991.
Retrieved 2010-04-21.


I distinctly remember the word, "any" rather than "no". Hispanics aren't
given to using double negatives as are we English speakers.

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Old April 14th 12, 06:42 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

On Apr 13, 9:45*pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:

I distinctly remember the word, "any" rather than "no". Hispanics aren't
given to using double negatives as are we English speakers.


While "any" was used in the movie and book, a double negative is
often used in Spanish, and unlike in English, it is considered
gramatically correct, merely adding emphasis rather than negating the
negative. For example, the sentence "No había nadie en casa" (Nobody
was home) would be fine, even though literally it means "There was not
nobody at home."



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Old April 15th 12, 06:24 PM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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Posts: 57
Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 10:42:57 -0700 (PDT), Taylor Kingston
wrote:

On Apr 13, 9:45*pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:

I distinctly remember the word, "any" rather than "no". Hispanics aren't
given to using double negatives as are we English speakers.


While "any" was used in the movie and book, a double negative is
often used in Spanish, and unlike in English, it is considered
gramatically correct, merely adding emphasis rather than negating the
negative. For example, the sentence "No había nadie en casa" (Nobody
was home) would be fine, even though literally it means "There was not
nobody at home."


Es verdad.

--
"I'm a ten gov a day guy. It's all I know, and it's all
you need to know, gov!"
- Shouting George
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Old April 16th 12, 01:59 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics,rec.games.chess.misc,misc.legal,rec.games.chess.computer,alt.accounting
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First recorded activity by ChessBanter: Mar 2011
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Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

Taylor Kingston wrote:
On Apr 13, 9:45 pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:

I distinctly remember the word, "any" rather than "no". Hispanics
aren't given to using double negatives as are we English speakers.


While "any" was used in the movie and book, a double negative is
often used in Spanish, and unlike in English, it is considered
gramatically correct, merely adding emphasis rather than negating the
negative. For example, the sentence "No había nadie en casa" (Nobody
was home) would be fine, even though literally it means "There was not
nobody at home."


Thank you.... I was not aware of that.

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Old April 16th 12, 03:40 AM posted to rec.games.chess.politics
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Posts: 3,073
Default What Ever Happened to the Missing $1,591,120 in cash and securities?

On Sunday, April 15, 2012 1:24:13 PM UTC-4, Kent Wills wrote:
On Sat, 14 Apr 2012 10:42:57 -0700 (PDT), Taylor Kingston
wrote:

On Apr 13, 9:45*pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:

I distinctly remember the word, "any" rather than "no". Hispanics aren't
given to using double negatives as are we English speakers.


While "any" was used in the movie and book, a double negative is
often used in Spanish, and unlike in English, it is considered
gramatically correct, merely adding emphasis rather than negating the
negative. For example, the sentence "No había nadie en casa" (Nobody
was home) would be fine, even though literally it means "There was not
nobody at home."


Es verdad.

--
"I'm a ten gov a day guy. It's all I know, and it's all
you need to know, gov!"
- Shouting George


Correcto no verdad.
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