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Old June 23rd 04, 01:34 AM
Isidor Gunsberg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Eye-Opening Opening play by Ni Hua in FIDE World Championship! 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4

Check out the opening played by Ni Hua (GM from China, rated 2587).
He had the misfortune to get paired against his compatriot, Ye
Jaingchuan in the 2nd Round of the FIDE WC. Thus, the last two reaming
Chinese players had to play each other, and one would be eliminated.
The match between Ni and Ye was tied after the first two "slow" games.
So, they played 2 rapid games. Then 2 blitz games with time bonus.
Finally, they played one final game, the Sudden Death Blitz, where
Black has draw odds.


*
[Event "WCC 2004"]
[Site "0:02.21-0:01.21"]
[Date "2004.06.22"]
[Round "27"]
[White "Ye, Jiangchuan"]
[Black "Ni, Hua"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2681"]
[WhiteCountry "CHN"]
[BlackElo "2587"]
[BlackCountry "CHN"]
[Remark "WCC 2004"]
[PresId "1000270012"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4 4. Qe2 Qe7 5. Qxe4 d6 6. d4 dxe5 7.
dxe5 Nc6 8. Bf4 g5 9. Bd2 f5 10. Qe2 Bg7 11. Nc3 Nd4 12. Qh5+ Qf7 13.
Qxf7+ Kxf7 14. O-O-O f4 15. Bxf4 gxf4 16. Rxd4 Bxe5 17. Bc4+ Be6 18.
Bxe6+ Kxe6 19. Re1 Kf5 20. Rd5 Rhe8 21. g4+ Kf6 22. g5+ Kf5 23. Nb5
Rac8 24. Nd4+ Kxg5 25. Rdxe5+ Rxe5 26. Rxe5+ Kg4 27. f3+ Kh3 28. Rh5+
Kg2 29. b4 c5 30. bxc5 Rd8 31. c3 Kf2 32. Kd2 Rd7 33. Kd3 Re7 34. a4
a6 35. a5 Rf7 36. Ke4 Ke1 37. Rf5 Rc7 38. Kxf4 Kd2 39. c4 Kd3 40. Ne6
Re7 41. Ke5 Kxc4 42. Kd6 Re8 43. Rf7 Kb5 44. Rxb7+ Kxa5 45. c6 1-0


3.2.8.2. A payment of 20% from the above prize fund shall be made to
the FIDE.

3.2.8.3. If a match is decided at the tiebreak play phase, the losing
player shall receive 20% of the differential between his prize and the
prize the winner would receive if he lost in the next round.

3.2.8.4. Where a match is decided by a sudden death game, the loser
shall receive 40% of the differential between his prize and the prize
the winner would receive if he lost in the next round.

It would have been "inconvenient" if Ni had upset Ye, the star
player of the Chinese. Was the outcome of the match truly at stake in
that 7th decisive game, or had the result been decided beforehand?

Because the match was tied after two games, and then ultimately went
to a Sudden Death tie-break game, Ni was entitled to get, according to
regulation 3.2.8.4 "40% of the differential between his prize and the
prize the winner would receive if he lost in the next round." This
amounts to $2,000. Was this part of an arrangement to compensate Ni
for not pressing to win the match?

Or is Ni simply one who is lacking in opening knowledge, to a
rather shocking extent for a GM?

He certainly doesn't know too much about the "Frankenstein-Dracula
Attack", else he would have played 4. Qh5 !? Even 4. Nxe4, allowing
4...d5 and conceding equality is better than 4. Bxf7+ ? The shocking
thing is that Vladimirov didn't win the game after that. Black's King
is safe, he occupies the center with pawns, and the trade of Bishop
for Knight is favorable in these circumstances.

[Event "WCC 2004"]
[Site "0:00.00-0:00.00"]
[Date "2004.06.20"]
[Round "16"]
[White "Ni, Hua"]
[Black "Vladimirov, Evgeny"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2587"]
[WhiteCountry "CHN"]
[BlackElo "2621"]
[BlackCountry "KAZ"]
[Remark "WCC 2004"]
[PresId "1000160053"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Nxe4 4. Bxf7+ Kxf7 5. Nxe4 d5 6. Ng3 Nc6 7.
d3 Be7 8. Nf3 Rf8 9. O-O Kg8 10. h3 Qd6 11. Re1 Bd7 12. b3 Rae8 13.
Bb2 Bf6 14. Rb1 g6 15. c4 Bg7 16. cxd5 Qxd5 17. Ne4 Nd4 18. Bxd4 exd4
19. Rc1 Bc6 20. Qd2 Qd7 21. Qg5 Rf5 22. Qg3 Re7 23. Rc2 Rf8 24. Rce2
Ree8 25. Nc5 Qd6 26. Rxe8 Rxe8 27. Rxe8+ Bxe8 28. Qxd6 cxd6 29. Nxb7
Bb5 30. Ne1 Bf8 31. Kf1 Kf7 32. a4 Bd7 33. Nf3 Ke6 34. Nxd4+ Kd5 35.
Nc2 Bg7 36. Na5 Bc3 37. Nc4 Kc5 38. Ke2 d5 39. Nd2 a5 40. Nf3 Kd6 41.
Nfd4 Kc5 42. Ke3 Bb2 43. Ne2 Bf6 44. f4 g5 45. g4 gxf4+ 46. Kxf4 h6
47. Kf3 Kd6 48. d4 Be8 49. Ne3 Bg6 50. Nf5+ Kc6 51. Nxh6 Bc2 52. Kf4
Bxb3 53. g5 Bh8 54. Nf7 Bg7 55. Ne5+ Kd6 56. Nc3 Bxe5+ 57. dxe5+ Ke6
58. g6 Bc2 59. Kg5 d4 60. Nb5 d3 61. g7 Kf7 62. Kh6 d2 63. Nc3 Bf5 64.
h4 Kg8 65. h5 Kf7 66. Kg5 Bc2 67. h6 Bxa4 68. e6+ Kg8 69. Ne4 1-0

With openings like these, it's a pity that Ni is gone...
  #2   Report Post  
Old June 23rd 04, 09:23 PM
Larry Tapper
 
Posts: n/a
Default Eye-Opening Opening play by Ni Hua in FIDE World Championship! 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4

(Isidor Gunsberg) wrote in message . com...
Check out the opening played by Ni Hua (GM from China, rated 2587).


Yep, those are mighty unusual openings. There are those who insist
that 3...Nxe4 is not as wretched as its reputation, though. FM Charlie
Hertan used to play this line frequently in Boston tournaments, even
sometimes against opponents who expected it.

LT


He had the misfortune to get paired against his compatriot, Ye
Jaingchuan in the 2nd Round of the FIDE WC. Thus, the last two reaming
Chinese players had to play each other, and one would be eliminated.
The match between Ni and Ye was tied after the first two "slow" games.
So, they played 2 rapid games. Then 2 blitz games with time bonus.
Finally, they played one final game, the Sudden Death Blitz, where
Black has draw odds.


*
[Event "WCC 2004"]
[Site "0:02.21-0:01.21"]
[Date "2004.06.22"]
[Round "27"]
[White "Ye, Jiangchuan"]
[Black "Ni, Hua"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2681"]
[WhiteCountry "CHN"]
[BlackElo "2587"]
[BlackCountry "CHN"]
[Remark "WCC 2004"]
[PresId "1000270012"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 Nxe4 4. Qe2 Qe7 5. Qxe4 d6 6. d4 dxe5 7.
dxe5 Nc6 8. Bf4 g5 9. Bd2 f5 10. Qe2 Bg7 11. Nc3 Nd4 12. Qh5+ Qf7 13.
Qxf7+ Kxf7 14. O-O-O f4 15. Bxf4 gxf4 16. Rxd4 Bxe5 17. Bc4+ Be6 18.
Bxe6+ Kxe6 19. Re1 Kf5 20. Rd5 Rhe8 21. g4+ Kf6 22. g5+ Kf5 23. Nb5
Rac8 24. Nd4+ Kxg5 25. Rdxe5+ Rxe5 26. Rxe5+ Kg4 27. f3+ Kh3 28. Rh5+
Kg2 29. b4 c5 30. bxc5 Rd8 31. c3 Kf2 32. Kd2 Rd7 33. Kd3 Re7 34. a4
a6 35. a5 Rf7 36. Ke4 Ke1 37. Rf5 Rc7 38. Kxf4 Kd2 39. c4 Kd3 40. Ne6
Re7 41. Ke5 Kxc4 42. Kd6 Re8 43. Rf7 Kb5 44. Rxb7+ Kxa5 45. c6 1-0


3.2.8.2. A payment of 20% from the above prize fund shall be made to
the FIDE.

3.2.8.3. If a match is decided at the tiebreak play phase, the losing
player shall receive 20% of the differential between his prize and the
prize the winner would receive if he lost in the next round.

3.2.8.4. Where a match is decided by a sudden death game, the loser
shall receive 40% of the differential between his prize and the prize
the winner would receive if he lost in the next round.

It would have been "inconvenient" if Ni had upset Ye, the star
player of the Chinese. Was the outcome of the match truly at stake in
that 7th decisive game, or had the result been decided beforehand?

Because the match was tied after two games, and then ultimately went
to a Sudden Death tie-break game, Ni was entitled to get, according to
regulation 3.2.8.4 "40% of the differential between his prize and the
prize the winner would receive if he lost in the next round." This
amounts to $2,000. Was this part of an arrangement to compensate Ni
for not pressing to win the match?

Or is Ni simply one who is lacking in opening knowledge, to a
rather shocking extent for a GM?

He certainly doesn't know too much about the "Frankenstein-Dracula
Attack", else he would have played 4. Qh5 !? Even 4. Nxe4, allowing
4...d5 and conceding equality is better than 4. Bxf7+ ? The shocking
thing is that Vladimirov didn't win the game after that. Black's King
is safe, he occupies the center with pawns, and the trade of Bishop
for Knight is favorable in these circumstances.

[Event "WCC 2004"]
[Site "0:00.00-0:00.00"]
[Date "2004.06.20"]
[Round "16"]
[White "Ni, Hua"]
[Black "Vladimirov, Evgeny"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2587"]
[WhiteCountry "CHN"]
[BlackElo "2621"]
[BlackCountry "KAZ"]
[Remark "WCC 2004"]
[PresId "1000160053"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Bc4 Nxe4 4. Bxf7+ Kxf7 5. Nxe4 d5 6. Ng3 Nc6 7.
d3 Be7 8. Nf3 Rf8 9. O-O Kg8 10. h3 Qd6 11. Re1 Bd7 12. b3 Rae8 13.
Bb2 Bf6 14. Rb1 g6 15. c4 Bg7 16. cxd5 Qxd5 17. Ne4 Nd4 18. Bxd4 exd4
19. Rc1 Bc6 20. Qd2 Qd7 21. Qg5 Rf5 22. Qg3 Re7 23. Rc2 Rf8 24. Rce2
Ree8 25. Nc5 Qd6 26. Rxe8 Rxe8 27. Rxe8+ Bxe8 28. Qxd6 cxd6 29. Nxb7
Bb5 30. Ne1 Bf8 31. Kf1 Kf7 32. a4 Bd7 33. Nf3 Ke6 34. Nxd4+ Kd5 35.
Nc2 Bg7 36. Na5 Bc3 37. Nc4 Kc5 38. Ke2 d5 39. Nd2 a5 40. Nf3 Kd6 41.
Nfd4 Kc5 42. Ke3 Bb2 43. Ne2 Bf6 44. f4 g5 45. g4 gxf4+ 46. Kxf4 h6
47. Kf3 Kd6 48. d4 Be8 49. Ne3 Bg6 50. Nf5+ Kc6 51. Nxh6 Bc2 52. Kf4
Bxb3 53. g5 Bh8 54. Nf7 Bg7 55. Ne5+ Kd6 56. Nc3 Bxe5+ 57. dxe5+ Ke6
58. g6 Bc2 59. Kg5 d4 60. Nb5 d3 61. g7 Kf7 62. Kh6 d2 63. Nc3 Bf5 64.
h4 Kg8 65. h5 Kf7 66. Kg5 Bc2 67. h6 Bxa4 68. e6+ Kg8 69. Ne4 1-0

With openings like these, it's a pity that Ni is gone...

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